How to take killer notes  Jennie Osborn Croydon, 3 rd  July 2010
Why are we here . . . ?
Killer app <ul><li>“ A  killer application  (commonly shortened to  killer app ), in the jargon of technologists, has been...
Killer notes <ul><li>“ killer notes”  in the jargon of Jennie Osborn, has been used to refer to any study skill that is so...
Aims of the Session <ul><li>To increase your understanding of reading and note-taking. </li></ul><ul><li>To develop your a...
The perfect cuppa  . . .  <ul><li>this one?  </li></ul><ul><li>this one? </li></ul>
The perfect cuppa  <ul><li>Use a good quality loose leaf or bagged tea </li></ul><ul><li>This must be stored in an air-tig...
Thinking about  your  notes <ul><li>Making notes </li></ul><ul><li>When do you make notes? </li></ul><ul><li>Why do you ma...
What happens next? <ul><li>What do you do with your notes? </li></ul><ul><li>When do you use your notes? </li></ul><ul><li...
Some methods <ul><li>Linear  </li></ul><ul><li>Highlighting </li></ul><ul><li>Underlining </li></ul><ul><li>Concept tree/m...
Pirate notes <ul><li>Question:  </li></ul><ul><li>Why are these notes so useful? </li></ul>Because they RRRRRRS
Cornell Note-taking System <ul><li>Record </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce </li></ul><ul><li>Recite </li></ul><ul><li>Reflect </li...
Cornell notes page
Record <ul><li>Record as many facts and ideas as you can </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t write every word </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t ...
Reduce or Question <ul><li>Reduce important facts to key words or phrases: memory cues. </li></ul><ul><li>Formulate questi...
Recite <ul><li>State  out loud  and  in your own words  the facts and ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Hearing your thoughts will s...
Reflect <ul><li>Enhance reflection by asking yourself questions:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How do these facts fit into what I...
Recapitulate <ul><li>Summarise your notes at the bottom of the note page. </li></ul><ul><li>Write in your own words </li><...
Cornell notes page
The system 4. & 5. reflect and review Review your notes periodically by reciting think about what you have learned. 6. Rec...
When in Rome . . .  <ul><li>Barthes, Roland (1980), “The Romans in Films”,  Mythologies , London: Granada Publishing. </li...
Feedback
Jennie Osborn Email: drjennieosborn@aol.com
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How to take killer notes

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How to take killer notes

  1. 1. How to take killer notes Jennie Osborn Croydon, 3 rd July 2010
  2. 2. Why are we here . . . ?
  3. 3. Killer app <ul><li>“ A killer application (commonly shortened to killer app ), in the jargon of technologists, has been used to refer to any computer program that is so necessary or desirable that it proves the core value of some larger technology, such as computer hardware , gaming console , software , or an operating system . </li></ul><ul><li>A killer app can substantially increase sales of the platform on which it runs.” </li></ul><ul><li>Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Killer_app , (accessed 2/07/10) </li></ul>
  4. 4. Killer notes <ul><li>“ killer notes” in the jargon of Jennie Osborn, has been used to refer to any study skill that is so necessary or desirable that it proves the core value of some larger academic purpose, such as critical thinking, essay writing, referencing, or time management. </li></ul><ul><li>Killer notes can substantially increase grades of the student on which it runs. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Aims of the Session <ul><li>To increase your understanding of reading and note-taking. </li></ul><ul><li>To develop your ability to make effective notes using different methods. </li></ul><ul><li>To improve your critical reading skills. </li></ul>
  6. 6. The perfect cuppa . . . <ul><li>this one? </li></ul><ul><li>this one? </li></ul>
  7. 7. The perfect cuppa <ul><li>Use a good quality loose leaf or bagged tea </li></ul><ul><li>This must be stored in an air-tight container at room temperature </li></ul><ul><li>Always use freshly drawn boiling water </li></ul><ul><li>In order to draw the best flavour out of the tea the water must contain oxygen, this is reduced if the water is boiled more than once. </li></ul><ul><li>Measure the tea carefully </li></ul><ul><li>Use 1 tea bag or 1 rounded teaspoon of loose tea for each cup to be served </li></ul><ul><li>Allow the tea to brew for the recommended time before pouring </li></ul><ul><li>Brewing tea from a bag in a mug? Milk in last is best </li></ul>
  8. 8. Thinking about your notes <ul><li>Making notes </li></ul><ul><li>When do you make notes? </li></ul><ul><li>Why do you make notes? </li></ul><ul><li>How do you make notes? </li></ul><ul><li>Why do you make notes like this? </li></ul><ul><li>Have you always made notes like this? </li></ul>
  9. 9. What happens next? <ul><li>What do you do with your notes? </li></ul><ul><li>When do you use your notes? </li></ul><ul><li>Why do you use your notes? </li></ul><ul><li>How do you use your notes? </li></ul><ul><li>Do your notes do what you want them to do? </li></ul><ul><li>How do you know when they are working? </li></ul><ul><li>How do you know when they aren’t working so well? </li></ul>
  10. 10. Some methods <ul><li>Linear </li></ul><ul><li>Highlighting </li></ul><ul><li>Underlining </li></ul><ul><li>Concept tree/mind map/spider diagram </li></ul><ul><li>Index cards </li></ul>
  11. 11. Pirate notes <ul><li>Question: </li></ul><ul><li>Why are these notes so useful? </li></ul>Because they RRRRRRS
  12. 12. Cornell Note-taking System <ul><li>Record </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce </li></ul><ul><li>Recite </li></ul><ul><li>Reflect </li></ul><ul><li>Review </li></ul><ul><li>Recapitulate </li></ul><ul><li>Sample </li></ul>
  13. 13. Cornell notes page
  14. 14. Record <ul><li>Record as many facts and ideas as you can </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t write every word </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t worry about grammatical correctness </li></ul><ul><li>Use key words – streamline </li></ul>
  15. 15. Reduce or Question <ul><li>Reduce important facts to key words or phrases: memory cues. </li></ul><ul><li>Formulate questions based on the facts and ideas: clarify meanings. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Recite <ul><li>State out loud and in your own words the facts and ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Hearing your thoughts will sharpen your thinking </li></ul><ul><li>Cover your notes while you are doing this. </li></ul><ul><li>Leave your cue words and questions uncovered. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Reflect <ul><li>Enhance reflection by asking yourself questions: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How do these facts fit into what I already know? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How can I apply them? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How is knowing this important? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What is their significance? </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. Recapitulate <ul><li>Summarise your notes at the bottom of the note page. </li></ul><ul><li>Write in your own words </li></ul><ul><li>Reflect the main points you want to remember </li></ul>
  19. 19. Cornell notes page
  20. 20. The system 4. & 5. reflect and review Review your notes periodically by reciting think about what you have learned. 6. Recapitulate: summarise each main idea Use complete sentences 2. Reduce or Question : write key phrases or question that serve as cues for notes taken in class. Cue phrases and questions should be in your own words. 3. Recite: With classroom notes covered, read each key word or question. Recite the fact or idea brought to mind by key words or questions 1. Record : write down facts and ideas in phrases. 4 & 5 Reflect and Review Review your notes periodically by reciting think about what you have learned.
  21. 21. When in Rome . . . <ul><li>Barthes, Roland (1980), “The Romans in Films”, Mythologies , London: Granada Publishing. </li></ul>
  22. 22. Feedback
  23. 23. Jennie Osborn Email: drjennieosborn@aol.com

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