Timringrosesept12

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Whats happening with online physician communities? What do doctors value and what are the opportunities for pharma and other healthcare organisations to get involved?

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Timringrosesept12

  1. 1. doctors_net_uk  Online  Physician  Communi;es:   Opportuni;es  for  Pharma   Tim  Ringrose,  CEO  
  2. 2. >3  million  doctors  are  members  of  online  professional  networks  –  Len  Starnes   •  Alliance  of  20  physician  communi>es   •  Over  1.2  million  doctors  are  part  of  the   Networks  in  Health  communi>es   •  600,000  doctors  in  Europe  5    
  3. 3. Doctors  use  a  complex  combina>on  of  devices  for  internet  access   “I  have  an  iPhone  and  I  use  it  more  than   “In  home,  general  use,  throughout   my  laptop  these  days”  [Specialist]   day  mainly  laptop  and  blackberry   iPad  device”  [GP]   “At  home:  laptop,  tablet   “I  use  iPad  for  social  use  mainly  at   and  phone,  At  work:   home,  laptop  mainly  for   phone  and  desktop   professional  at  home  ,  and  iPhone   pc”  [Specialist]   for  both  wherever  I  am  ”  [GP]   “Desktop  and  laptop  at  work,  iPad   (mostly),  laptop  and  iPhone  at  home,   iPhone  on  the  move”  [GP]  3  
  4. 4. Use  of  Internet  by  device  –  UK  GPs     80  %   Laptop,  desktop  or   netbook   70  %   60  %  %  >me  online     50  %   40  %   30  %   20  %   Smartphone   Tablet/iPad)   10  %   Games  Console   e-­‐Reader   TV   Other   0  %   GPs  (1,005)   *July  2012  medeSource   n  –  1,004  GPs   medeSource  
  5. 5. Ac>vi>es  undertaken  via  mobile  vs  desktop  /  laptops  email   Networking   Resolving   News   General   Training   Appraisals   Other   clinical   informa;on   problems   gathering   Mobile   Desktop  /  laptop   Please  select  which,  if  any,  of  the  following  func;ons  you  access  via   mobile  internet  devices  (tablets  and  smartphones)    /  desktops  or   laptops  
  6. 6. UK  Doctors  reasons  for  using  top  3  websites   Reasons  for  using  top  3  websites  %  of  respondents   Physician  Network   Google   PubMed   59  %   General  update  of  my  medical  knowledge   56  %   37  %   56  %   Catch  up  on  news  about  the  healthcare  system  of  UK   31  %   10  %   41  %   To  catch  up  on  local  or  na;onal  policy/guidelines   44  %   3  %   To  take  part  in  an  online  Con;nued  Medical  Educa;on   41  %   19  %   (CME)  module   10  %   Catch  up  on  news  about  new  products/  products  in   38  %   25  %   development   10  %   31  %   To  read  blogs   3  %   31  %   To  receive/read  a  news  update/  email  newsle]er   22  %   7  %   31  %   To  access  a  clinical  paper  of  interest   88  %   80  %  
  7. 7. What  sources  of  informa>on  do  doctors  trust?   Credibility  of  informa>on  source  vs.  Usefulness  of  informa>on  sources   Mean  score     Credibility  of  informa;on  source   Usefulness  of  informa;on  sources   1   4   7   Medical  journals  (online  or  in  a  paper  format)   Independent  medical  websites/  networks  (i.e.  not  funded   by  a  pharmaceu>cal  company  or  the  government)   Product  websites  provided  by  the  manufacturer   General  medical  websites  generated  by/  sponsored  by  a   pharmaceu>cal  company   Electronic/  emailed  sales  presenta>ons  for  products   (which  you  navigate  through)   Medical  blogs  or  tweets  Using  a  ra;ng  scale  where  1  =  not  at  all  credible  and  7  =  extremely  credible,  please  rate  how  credible  you  find  the  following  informa;on  sources  for  providing  medical/  professional  informa;on  for  you?  Using  a  ra;ng  scale  where  1  =  not  at  all  useful  and  7  =  extremely  useful,  please  rate  how  useful  you  find  each  of  the  following  informa;on  sources  for  providing  medical/  professional  informa;on  for  you?    Base:  All  HCV  Physicians  (50)    
  8. 8. Preferred  methods  of  upda>ng  knowledge  –  Primary  Care   65% Local/national study days, courses and conferences 57% 74%Internet resources, e.g. Doctors.net, OnMedica, EMIS Mentor, websites of 61% 79% colleges such as RCGP and RCN 43% 33%Informal discussions with other members of the primary healthcare team 31% 35% 24% Print versions of journals 21% 27% 23% Online journals 24% 23% All respondents 23% Distance learning courses 30% GPs 16% 21% Visits from pharmaceutical reps 12% Nurses 30% 12% Textbooks 15% 9% 10% Attending hospital clinics/shadowing other healthcare professionals 8% 13% 9% Charity websites 4% 14% 8% Contact with a condition-specific charity 3% 14% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% “There  are  many  ways  in  which  healthcare  professionals  keep  up  to  date  with  condi;ons  and  treatments.       Which  of  the  following  are  your  preferred  methods,  if  any?    Please  choose  up  to  3.”   Base:  200  GPs  and  200  nurses  working  in  primary  care,  UK   Source:  Primary  Healthcare  Professionals  Monitor,  Sep  10,  nfpSynergy     8  
  9. 9. Only  14%  of  doctors  say  they  visit  the  websites  of  pharmaceu>cal  companies  once-­‐a-­‐month  or  more   Frequency  of  visi>ng  pharmaceu>cal  company  websites   0%   3%   10%   Never   38%   Less  than  once  a  month   More  than  once  a  month   but  less  than  once  a  week   More  than  once  a  week   Daily   48%  How  oien  do  you  visit  websites  of  pharmaceu;cal  companies?       Base:  Sept  2011  =  1025  GPs  
  10. 10. Engage  in  your  audience’s  channel  of  choice  
  11. 11. Blending  digital  ac>vi>es  with  tradi>onal  sales  and  marke>ng  -­‐  beder  reach  and  greater  depth  of  engagement     ‘No  See’  doctors   Doctors  accessible   by  sales-­‐force   Digital  increases   coverage   Digital  increases  depth  &  frequency  of   engagement  for  doctors  accessible  by  rep  force  
  12. 12. Primary  Care  60000   Universe  50000   Reach  40000  30000  20000  10000   0   France   Germany   Italy   Spain   UK  
  13. 13. Secondary  Care  by  Market  350000   Universe  300000   Reach  250000  200000  150000  100000   50000   0   France   Germany   Italy   Spain   UK  
  14. 14. Reasons  for  Accessing  Physician-­‐Only  Social  Networks  in  Major  European  Markets   Share of physicians in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK Percentage  of  physicians   Informa>on  retrieval  ac>vi>es   To  stay  up  to  date  with  medical  informa;on   66%   To  get  informa>on  efficiently   48%   Interac>ve  ac>vi>es   To  ask  a  clinical  ques>on   35%   To  network   32%   To  ask  a  ques;on  or  get  advice  on  how  to  manage  prac>ce   27%   To  access  physicians  or  specialists  that  can’t  be  found  offline   23%   Other   1%   Among physicians who use online communities created for physicians Source: Taking the Pulse® Europe 2011 (countries surveyed: France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK)
  15. 15. “   Why  doctors  use  online  networks   Informa>on   Educa>on   Collabora>on   •  Researching  medical  literature   •  Comple;ng  online  accredited  CME   •  Exchanging  views  and  opinions  in   •  Keeping  up  to  date  with  medical   •  Tracking  and  managing  their   clinical  fora   journals   professional  development   •  Discussing  key  medical  issues   •  Gathering  relevant  clinical   •  Viewing  highlights  from   together   informa;on  from  colleagues   interna;onal  medical  conferences   •  Professional,  portable,  fully   •  Reviewing  the  latest  medical   accessible  email  service   imagery   15   15  
  16. 16. 18  
  17. 17. What  maders  most  to  GPs/PCPs  about  online   learning?  Based  around  real  clinical  scenarios   Concise   The  accredita>on  for  CPD  credits   Simplicity  The  editorial  quality  of  the  material   The  independence  of  the  material   Ability  to  interact  with  material   Use  of  mul>media  The  na>onal  standing  of  the  author  
  18. 18. 20  
  19. 19. Learning  needs  analysis  iden>fies  knowledge  gaps         In  pa>ents  with  type  2  diabetes  and  CKD:   Op>on   Correct   Correct   Incorrect   Correct   answers   answers   answers  %              Hypertension  should  be  treated  with  an  ACE  inhibitor   Correct   725   395   64.73%              The  target  for  blood  pressure  is  140/80  mmHg   Incorrect   937   183   83.66%              Dietary  protein  restric;on  will  slow  the  progression  of  renal  damage   Incorrect   928   192   82.85%              Aspirin  is  a  rou;ne  part  of  management   Correct   273   847   24.37%              The  targets  for  total  and  LDL  cholesterol  are  <4  mmol/L  and  <2  mmol/L                      respec;vely   Correct   623   497   55.62%  
  20. 20. Learning  should  cover  a  wide  range  of  styles…  
  21. 21. Integrate  with  the  sales  funnel   24  
  22. 22. What  are  the  available  op>ons?    Product  promo>on:     Self-­‐directed  eDetail       Factsheet     Mode  of  ac;on    Branded  learning:     Clinical  Summary     Pa;ent  Case  Studies     Guidelines    Independent  educa>on:     Learning  Needs  Analysis     Case-­‐based  learning    Interac;vity  is  key  for  all  these   elements  to  engage  the  doctors  in  a   dialogue    
  23. 23. Tac>cal  implementa>on:  Campaign  pathway  Test  brand  percep;on  with  GPs   Development  of  evidence-­‐based   message  hierarchy   Development  of  addi;onal  digital   hooks   Promo;onal  strategy  implemented   following  A/B  message  tes;ng   Full  in-­‐campaign  op;misa;on   26  
  24. 24. How  digital  can  support  the  sales-­‐cycle   Pre-­‐launch   Launch   Op>misa>on  1 2 3 4   5     Con;nue   Engage  the   Benefits-­‐led   educa;on  &   Measure,   target   engagement  &   promo   gather  insight,  Gather  insight   segment  in   educa;on     messaging,   evaluate  &   disease,   Launch  &   building  on   op;mise   therapy  or   promo   rela;onship   procedure   solu;on   with  target   doctors   Time Increasing value to doctors
  25. 25. What  are  the  most  important  factors  for  engagement?   ▪  Target/segmenta;on   Clinical   ▪  Be]er,  cheaper,  safer?   Usability   relevance   Use  of   mul>media   ▪  Design   Usability   ▪  Accessibility   Clinical  Relevance   ▪  User-­‐centred   ▪  Jus;fiable   Use  of   ▪  Bite-­‐sized   mul>media   ▪  Accessible   Channel  of  choice   ENGAGEMENT  
  26. 26. Engagement  through  a  clinician  community   Evidence-­‐based   programme  design    Content  interac;on    Campaign   op;misa;on    Customer  profile    Inform  future  online   and  offline  tac;cs     promo;on   message  &   repor;ng     ac;ons   content    
  27. 27. How  the  NHS  engages  with  doctors  
  28. 28. Case  Study  Overview:  Online  vs  rep   Sales  vs  expenditure  and  ROI  Objec>ve  1.  Reduce  the  cost  of  promo;on  to  GPs  by   !"#$% )!!!" switching  from  a  CSO  to  an  en;rely   (!!!" 011234"534+5" online  approach   !!!" 67834"59+1:";!!!<"2.  Maintain  sales  growth  as  the  CSO  team   &!!!" had  delivered   %!!!"   $!!!" #!!!" Programme   !" *+,-!(" *+,-!)" *+,-!." *+,-!/" *+,-#!" •  12  month  mul;-­‐wave  campaign   consis;ng  of  educa;onal  and   promo;onal  content   Results   •  Ongoing  message  development  based   •  Audience  reached  at  higher   on  ac;vi;es  and  Doctors.net.uk   frequency  than    50-­‐strong  sales   member  feedback   team   •  Campaign  impact  market  research   •  Over  23%  sales  growth  for  brand  at   assessment  carried  out  by   lower  cost  than  CSO   medeConnect   3
  29. 29. Promo>onal  programme  
  30. 30. PNE  Programme:  Resource  Center  Germany  
  31. 31. What  can  we  measure?    1   Awareness  and  engagement  with  specific  key  messages  and  informa>on   resources  by:   ▪  Unique  doctors  exposed  to  key  messages     ▪  Unique  doctors  visi;ng  content  pages   ▪  Frequency/repeat  visits  –  CUVs  (campaign  user  views)   ▪  Time  spent    2   Change  in  prescribing  inten>on,  percep>ons,  behaviour:   ▪  Research  impact  with  specific  studies,  interactors  vs.  non-­‐interactors   ▪  Large  scale  surveys      3   Educa>onal  programmes  and  content   ▪  Measurement  of  specific  knowledge  gaps     ▪  Measure  specific  change  and  improvement  in  knowledge       3
  32. 32. Interac>on  repor>ng  example   Specialty   Unique   Campaign   Visit   Avg  Time   Avg  Time   Total  Time  Spent       Drs     Visits   Frequency   Per  Dr   Per  Visit   All  Doctors       24,920   51,357   2.1   4m  49s       2m  20s   83d:7h:56m:23s     Oncologists     955   9,822   10.3   29m  11s       2m  50s   19d:8h:25m:26s     Snr  Grade  Oncs   607   6,835   11.3   29m  17s       2m  36s   12d:8h:15m:53s     Haematology     655   3,899   6.0   13m  10s     2m  13s   5d:23h:44m:2s     Snr  Grade  Haems   388   2,649   6.8   15m  44s       2m  18s   4d:5h:48m:43s    General  Prac>ce   8,352   15,794   1.9   6m  54s       3m  39s   40d:1h:39m:1s     76%  of  all  UK  oncologists  have  engaged  with  the  programme  
  33. 33. Message  reten>on:  74%  of  ‘e-­‐detail’  doctors  and  60%  of  ‘rep   visit’  doctors  recalled  4  or  more  of  the  key  messages  when   prompted   Number  of  prompted  messages  recalled  XXXX  rep  visit  drs   4  %2  %     10  %   24  %   24  %   22  %   14  %   Ave  =  3.8  XXXX  e-­‐detail  drs   2  %   14  %   52  %   24  %   8  %   Ave  =  4.2   0   1   2   3   4   5   6   Thinking  about  this  online  product  informa;on  module  for  XXXX,  which  of  the  following   points,  if  any,  were  included?     Thinking  about  this  discussion  of  XXXX  which  of  the  following  points,  if  any,  did  the   pharmaceu;cal  representa;ve  discuss  with  you?     Base:  XXXX‘rep  visit’  drs  n  =  50;  XXXX‘e-­‐detail’  drs  n  =  50  
  34. 34. Campaign  impact  assessment:  Rep  vs  edetail  example   Future  prescribing  of  XXXX   XXXX  rep  visit  drs   38  %   56  %   6  %   XXXX  e-­‐detail  drs   14  %   80  %   6  %   Decrease  significantly   Decrease  a  li]le   No  change   Increase  a  li]le   Increase  significantly   As  a  result  of  the  online  product  informa;on  module  for  xxxx  how,  if  at  all,  do  you  expect  your   prescribing  of  XXXX  to  change?     As  a  result  of  the  discussion  you  had  with  the  pharmaceu;cal  representa;ve,  how  do  you  think  your   prescribing  of  XXXX  will  change  over  the  next  month?   Base:  XXXX  ‘rep  visit’  drs  n  =  50;  XXXX  ‘e-­‐detail’  drs  n  =  50  
  35. 35. Summary  1.  Take  a  longer  term  view  to  engaging  physician  customers  2.  Engage  customers/physicians  in  their  preferred  channels  3.  Think  beyond  promo>on,  share  knowledge  &  educate  4.  Gather  insight  and  integrate  engagement  into  plans    5.  Measure  each  phase  at  different  levels,  to  con>nually   op>mise,  inform  and  feed  the  sales  pipeline      

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