Transitions 2014: 48 tips that just might change your life

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Here's the slide set from my talk at Transitions 2014, Lynn University. Questions? David@DrNowell.com

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  • NeuroanatomyNeurotransmittersPhenomenology of dopamine and serotonin
  • NeuroanatomyNeurotransmittersPhenomenology of dopamine and serotonin
  • NeuroanatomyNeurotransmittersPhenomenology of dopamine and serotonin
  • Emory University neuroscientists James Rilling and Gregory Berns. They found that the act of helping another person triggers activity in the caudate nucleus and anterior cingulate cortex regions of the brain, the parts involved in pleasure and reward.Ss instructed to plan 5 acts of kindness during week. Lyubomirsky, S., Sheldon, K. M., & Schkade, D. (2005). Pursuing happiness: The architecture of sustainable change. Review of General Psychology, 9, 111-131.
  • Generally, humans prefer large to small, immediate to delayed, and guaranteed to uncertain rewards. However, as the delay preceding delivery of a larger reward increases, or the likelihood of receiving a larger reward decreases, the reward’s subjective value decreases. This decline results in a tendency to choose small immediate/certain rewards instead of larger delayed/uncertain rewards. Declines in subjective value attributable to the time of reward delivery are termed delay discounting. Declines that relate to the reward’s uncertainty are termed probability discounting.PersIndivid Dif. 2007 November; 43(7): 1886–1897.doi:  10.1016/j.paid.2007.06.016PMCID: PMC2083651NIHMSID: NIHMS33372Adolescents’ performance on delay and probability discounting tasks: contributions of age, intelligence, executive functioning, and self-reported externalizing behaviorElizabeth A. Olson,* Catalina J. Hooper, Paul Collins, and Monica Luciana
  • Generally, humans prefer large to small, immediate to delayed, and guaranteed to uncertain rewards. However, as the delay preceding delivery of a larger reward increases, or the likelihood of receiving a larger reward decreases, the reward’s subjective value decreases. This decline results in a tendency to choose small immediate/certain rewards instead of larger delayed/uncertain rewards. Declines in subjective value attributable to the time of reward delivery are termed delay discounting. Declines that relate to the reward’s uncertainty are termed probability discounting.PersIndivid Dif. 2007 November; 43(7): 1886–1897.doi:  10.1016/j.paid.2007.06.016PMCID: PMC2083651NIHMSID: NIHMS33372Adolescents’ performance on delay and probability discounting tasks: contributions of age, intelligence, executive functioning, and self-reported externalizing behaviorElizabeth A. Olson,* Catalina J. Hooper, Paul Collins, and Monica Luciana
  • Generally, humans prefer large to small, immediate to delayed, and guaranteed to uncertain rewards. However, as the delay preceding delivery of a larger reward increases, or the likelihood of receiving a larger reward decreases, the reward’s subjective value decreases. This decline results in a tendency to choose small immediate/certain rewards instead of larger delayed/uncertain rewards. Declines in subjective value attributable to the time of reward delivery are termed delay discounting. Declines that relate to the reward’s uncertainty are termed probability discounting.PersIndivid Dif. 2007 November; 43(7): 1886–1897.doi:  10.1016/j.paid.2007.06.016PMCID: PMC2083651NIHMSID: NIHMS33372Adolescents’ performance on delay and probability discounting tasks: contributions of age, intelligence, executive functioning, and self-reported externalizing behaviorElizabeth A. Olson,* Catalina J. Hooper, Paul Collins, and Monica Luciana
  • Modern technology has evolved to exploit our urgency addiction: email, Facebook, Twitter, Quora and more will fight to distract you constantly. Fortunately, this is easily fixed: turn off all your notifications.Choose to check these things when you have time to be distracted – say, during a lunch break – and work through them together, saving time.
  • Getting to the gym – esp after full day’s work – is harder than a 3 / 10.
  • Can’t decide whether it’s important? Watch tvvs study french: make it vivid
  • kaminski
  • CUTTING PLAY DOH WITH SCISSORS
  • 2:00
  • 29 times a month he made curfew. That’s great executive fx !
  • EXPLAIN WKSHOP’S PURPOSE, INCREASE SALIENCE, RELATE TO PRIOR K’LEDGE
  • Kick Start Sunday and Win Wednesday
  • Comorbidities: anxiety, odd, LD, bipolar, and ?memory
  • MYSTERY BOXHAVE ST / VP PUT NAMES OF ATTENDEES IN HATAPPENDIX A p. a2: TO DO
  • Transitions 2014: 48 tips that just might change your life

    1. 1. 48 Tips That Just Might Change Your Life David D. Nowell, Ph.D. www.DrNowell.com DavidNowellSeminars DavidNowell
    2. 2. www.slideshare.net/dnowell
    3. 3. A strategy has no stand-alone value
    4. 4. Look for the exceptions
    5. 5. Two weeks from now, how will you know whether it’s working?
    6. 6. Knock 3 years off his age
    7. 7. Cortico-striatal loop
    8. 8. Get to know what dopamine “feeeeels like” for you
    9. 9. Beware dopamine tricksters!
    10. 10. Determine – in advance – when you’ll check email and Facebook tomorrow
    11. 11. StayOnTask app
    12. 12. If It’s Harder than a “3” Find Some Way to Make It Easier easy hard
    13. 13. Pomodoro technique
    14. 14. Increase the saliency of boring or difficult tasks
    15. 15. Pay attention to your sensory needs and style • What is your body asking for right now? Less of what? And more of….what?
    16. 16. Create a study-playlist
    17. 17. Instant study carrel
    18. 18. Set clear boundaries
    19. 19. Launching pad
    20. 20. Clear (see-through) storage
    21. 21. 60-Second Bathroom Cleaning Routine
    22. 22. Using your phone’s navigator as a time-management tool
    23. 23. Use a “single in-box”
    24. 24. Tickler System
    25. 25. EZ-C Reader
    26. 26. Prepare your budget with your ADD in mind • • • • • • Coaching Counseling Accounting support Personal assistant Local, organic-if-possible, unprocessed food Fiverr.com
    27. 27. The “Big Five” • • • • • Daily focus time Nutrition Movement Sleep Connection
    28. 28. Yoga / read Phone calls Staff meeting Planning session billing
    29. 29. Weekly planning session
    30. 30. Weekly planning session
    31. 31. 10 minute morning check-in
    32. 32. Develop a morning power-routine • • • • • • Affirmations Visualizations Yoga Quiet Reading Journaling • www.MiracleMorning.com • www.theFeelGoodLifestyle.com
    33. 33. 1/29/2014 © 2011 David D. Nowell, Ph.D. All rights reserved. 95
    34. 34. Fall in Love with the Truth • Self-monitor and collect data: – How long does your morning routine take, exactly? – How, exactly, do you follow through on commitments to others and not to yourself? – Which tasks are not getting completed? And how - exactly – are these not getting completed? How do you do that?
    35. 35. The “Big Five” • • • • • Daily focus time / Motivational clarity Nutrition Movement Sleep Connection
    36. 36. Nutrition essentials • • • • • Emphasize protein at every snack and meal Eat fewer processed foods Choose local Choose colorful Pay close attention to patterns between food and focus/mood
    37. 37. Barter practical and social support
    38. 38. The “Big Five” • • • • • Daily focus time / Motivational clarity Nutrition Movement Sleep Connection
    39. 39. Turn 30 minutes into 45 • “Exercise for focus” is different from “exercise for fitness”
    40. 40. “Exercise for focus” is different from "exercise for fitness”
    41. 41. The “Big Five” • • • • • Daily focus time / Motivational clarity Nutrition Movement Sleep Connection
    42. 42. The “Big Five” • • • • • Daily focus time / Motivational clarity Nutrition Movement Sleep Connection
    43. 43. Marry well and get a crackerjack assistant at work
    44. 44. Don’t do something for your ADHD partner which could be performed by a device or an app
    45. 45. Shower coach
    46. 46. Walk me up
    47. 47. Clocky
    48. 48. (f or t he non-AD D par t ner ) Ask f or w hat you w ant
    49. 49. Let your non-ADD roommate tackle the detailed long-term projects while you manage the time-limited projects
    50. 50. Increase salience
    51. 51. Meet with your ADHD employee for regular ongoing feedback
    52. 52. Consider online peer support www.reddit.com/r/ADHD/
    53. 53. Stop trying to explain yourself to people who don’t get it
    54. 54. “Conscious”
    55. 55. “Conscious”
    56. 56. Manage co-occurring conditions
    57. 57. Stuck? Treatment and strategies not working? Consider a formal ADHD evaluation • http://www.blogtalkradio.com/add-adhdcoaching/2013/08/29/diagnosis-andevaluation-of-adult-add-adhd
    58. 58. Let’s stay in touch!  Join my e-newsletter list:  Sign up on my web site or Facebook page  Text to join: text DNSEMINARS to 22828  On the web: www.DrNowell.com @davidnowell David Nowell Seminars

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