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The Behavior Design Checklist for Employee Wellness Programs

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The Behavior Design Checklist Tool to Identify Strengths and Weaknesses in Physical Activity Employee Wellness Programs.

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The Behavior Design Checklist for Employee Wellness Programs

  1. 1. The Checklist: Behavior Design Tool for Physical Activity Wellness Programs This checklist was influenced by leading behavior change and persuasion frameworks. It was born out of a Stanford Honors Thesis research project to evaluate physical activity wellness programs. The purpose of The Checklist is to guide wellness directors and designers to systematically think through and identify strengths and weaknesses in behavior change programs. Research 1: Fogg Behavioral Model Research 2: Positive Reinforcement Research 3: Cialdini Influence Principles The Fogg Behavioral Model (FBM) serves as a high level glance test in The Checklist. The FBM posits that a behavior will only happen if three things are simultaneously present: 1) A call to action: The trigger 2) Simplicity: easy enough to do 3) Motivation: a desire to do Positive reinforcement research is based on shaping behavior through “rewards” at small doses in random intervals. The timing of the positive reinforcer is key because you want it to happen DURING the target behavior. Also, the reward (positive reinforcer) is most powerful at RANDOM intervals. For example, imagine the common habit of checking emails or text messages: we never know what email or message we will receive, but SOMETIMES we hear from someone worthwhile (the reward). Your program should aim to be this addicting. Dr. Robert Cialdini’s research on the six universal principles of influence targets the most specific aspects of the program. 1) Authority 2) Commitment/Consistency 3) Similarity 4) Scarcity 5) Social Proof bit.ly/foggmodel Resources bit.ly/positivereinforcement http://bit.ly/cialdiniprinciples Tuesday, April 16, 13
  2. 2. The Checklist: Behavior Design Tool for Physical Activity Wellness Programs This checklist is based on the three most influential psychological research on behavior change and persuasion. Packaged in a way that helps wellness directors and innovators alike, this checklist offers a systematic tool that is easy to use for designing effective behavior change. Set 1: Glance Test A. Trigger: Is it clear how this program triggers Bob or Susan to participate in the program? (i.e., email, brochure, weekly in-person meeting) B. Ability: Is it easy for Bob or Susan to actually engage in the target physical activity program? C. Motivation: Have Bob or Susan expressed desire to participate in the program? Set 2: Reinforcement Test (program perspective) A. Do Bob or Susan receive positive reinforcement DURING their participation in the wellness program? B. Are you giving positive reinforcement/rewards at random frequencies throughout the program? Set 3: Influence Test A. Authority: Is the program represented by a respected/admired brand or figure? B. Commitment/Consistency: Has Bob or Susan made a commitment to something small that relates to the goal of the target program? (i.e., employees expressing interest on a form to learn more about dance classes will be more likely to attend dance classes because they want to stay consistent with their commitment). C. Similarity: Are there existing participants similar to Bob or Susan? (i.e., 20-25 year old males will most likely not attend a class that is 95% 40-50 year old mothers because it seems like a class for “Mothers”). D. Scarcity: Is a valuable aspect of the program deliberately hard to obtain? (i.e., Limited enrollment and first come first served makes a program more desirable) E. Social Proof: Do Bob or Susan see this wellness program as popular? Yes/No Total_ _ Yes/No Notes & Things to Consider Tuesday, April 16, 13
  3. 3. The Checklist: Behavior Design Tool for Physical Activity Wellness Programs What now? Wellness directors and designers have found that The Checklist helps them think through the strengths and weaknesses of their programs through different perspectives. Now the next step is to take action with this new data. The Checklist is deliberately designed to be dependent on each previous section. With your results in front of you: 1) First, get all Yes’s for the Glance Test 2) Second, get all Yes’s for the Reinforcement Test 3) Third, get all Yes’s for the Influence Test Set 1: Glance Test Set 2: Reinforcement Test (program perspective) Set 3: Influence Test A. What do you need to focus on? B. What is the smallest, immediate step to move toward this goal? C. What is the metric in which you will know if you’re making progress? DO NOT fill out Set 2 or Set 3 before you receive ALL Yes’s in Set 1 DO NOT fill out Set 3 before you receive ALL Yes’s in Sets 1 & 2 If you can’t actually do part B immediately finishing this section, it is not small and actionable enough. Make it even smaller so you can do it now. If you can’t actually do part B immediately finishing this section, it is not small and actionable enough. Make it even smaller so you can do it now. Tuesday, April 16, 13

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