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LAFS Game Mechanics - Tactical Mechanics

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Level 3 of the Los Angeles Film School's Game Mechanics class.

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LAFS Game Mechanics - Tactical Mechanics

  1. 1. Level 3 David Mullich Game Mechanics The Los Angeles Film School
  2. 2. Mechanics ACTION Actual Action of the Mechanic REWARD Reward for Executing the Action TRIGGER Event that Triggers the Action
  3. 3. Progression The ongoing procedures after the game’s set- up, leading to a desired resolution.
  4. 4. Tracking Progress  Score  Level  Improved/New Abilities (Gain Competence)  Position (Race)  Resources (Collection)
  5. 5. Game Objects  Pick-Up  Tool  Power-Up  Controller  Charger
  6. 6. Making Progression More Meaningful  Add a Strategic Component  Shaping Learning Curve  Reward Most Engaging Way To Play  Enhance Narrative and Character Development  Provide Cohesion and Consistency
  7. 7. What Are Tactics?
  8. 8. Tactics Actions carefully planned to achieve a goal or subgoal.
  9. 9. How Is That Different From Strategy?
  10. 10. Strategy A plan of action to achieve an overall goal.
  11. 11. Theater Of Combat
  12. 12. Units Groups of game elements under the player’s control that let the player perform actions to influence the Game World.
  13. 13. Unit Design Considerations  Actions and Attributes  Initial Number  Production and Consumption  Selection and Tracking  Autonomy  Avatar Companion  Ownership Changes Design Analysis: Units
  14. 14. Why Designers Use Units  Multiple Focus Loci  Attention Swapping  Varied Gameplay and Tactics  Strategic Thinking
  15. 15. Enemies Avatars and units that hinder players trying to complete their goals.
  16. 16. Enemy Design Considerations  Number  Placement  Abilities and Attributes  Tactics to Overcome or Evade Design Analysis: Enemy
  17. 17. Why Designers Use Enemies  Movement and Maneuvering Hazards  Competition and Threat  Balance Difficulty  Overcome and Evade Goals
  18. 18. Goal Hierarchy Involving Enemies 1. Series of Duels 2. Learn Enemy’s Identity or Achilles Heal 3. Find Tools For Defeating 4. Defeat Henchmen 5. ??????
  19. 19. Bosses A more powerful enemy that players must overcome to reach certain goals in the game.
  20. 20. Boss Design Considerations  High-Level Goal or Main Goal?  How Is It Defeated?  Difficulty
  21. 21. Why Designers Use Bosses  Structure Progress  Balances Levels  Antagonists For Narrative
  22. 22. Strategic Locations Areas in the game world that give advantages to the players controlling them.
  23. 23. What Types Of Locations Are Strategic?
  24. 24. Examples of Strategic Locations  Pick-Ups  Power-Ups  Chargers  Controllers  Safe Havens  Resource Generators  Spawn Points  Choke Points
  25. 25. Explicit vs. Implicit Explicit  Strategic objects permanently placed Implicit  Strategic objects nearby  Strategic objects placed randomly
  26. 26. Strategic Location Design Considerations  What Makes Location Strategic?  Explicit or Implicit
  27. 27. Why Designers Use Strategic Locations  Memorization For Strategic Knowledge  Area Control  Balances Player Actions (especially Combat)  Supports Traverse, Gain Information, Gain Ownership, Reconnaissance, Exploration, and Guard Goals
  28. 28. Combat Actions where the intent is to eliminate or otherwise overcome opponents.
  29. 29. Avatars vs. Units Combat Avatars  Fighting Games or RPGs  Tools and Improved/New Abilities  Combo Actions  Health Points, balanced by Lives, Stuns, Forced Retreats, Resistances Units  Strategy Games  Attention Swapping and Privileged Abilities  Collaborative Actions  Damage Points, balanced by Achilles Heels and Strategic Locations
  30. 30. Turn-Based vs. Real-Time Combat Turn-Based  Budgeted Action Points Real-Time  Dexterity-Based Actions and Timing
  31. 31. Combat Design Considerations  Avatars or Units?  Turn-based or Real-time?  Attack Success (Blocking)  Lives or Damage?  Damage Amount (Reduction)  Information about Enemy/Boss  Randomness
  32. 32. Why Designers Use Combat  Conflict  Tension  Supports Eliminate, Overcome, and Capture Goals
  33. 33. Limited Set of Actions Players can only have a few actions to choose from.
  34. 34. Limited Actions Design Considerations  Actions Available  Focus Loci  Play Modes Design Analysis: Limited Ability Considerations
  35. 35. Why Designers Use Limited Set Of Actions  Balance Complexity  Balance Units or Teams (through Privileged Ability losses)  Strategic Planning Dangers:  Limits Freedom of Choice  Analysis Paralysis (especially with high Penalties)
  36. 36. Decreased Abilities Player’s chance of succeeding with, or the effect of, an action is decreased.
  37. 37. Decreased Abilities Design Considerations  Ability Decreased  Cause of Decrease  Type of Descrease  Direct: Ability Attributes  Indirect: Resource Availability  Consequences of Decrease  Chance to Succeed  Effect Design Analysis: Decreased Ability
  38. 38. Why Designers Use Decreased Abilities  Penalty  Balancing Difficulty, Complexity, Players, Characters, Skills, Units Warning! Limits:  Freedom of Choice  Chance to Succeed  Illusion of Influence
  39. 39. Ability Losses The loss of ability to perform an action in a game.
  40. 40. Ability Loss Design Considerations  Ability Lost  Cause of Loss  Effect of Loss  Length of Loss Design Analysis: Ability Loss
  41. 41. Why Designers Use Ability Losses  Penalty  Limiting Actions  Play Modes  Varied Gameplay  Balances Players  Supports Gain Competency Goal  Supports Gain Ownership of Tools Warning:  Restricts Freedom of Choice  Promotes Downtime
  42. 42. Asymmetric Abilities When players or game elements do not have all the same actions available.
  43. 43. Asymmetric Ability Design Considerations  Focus Loci  Explicit  Privileged Abilities  Implicit  Asymmetric Resource Distribution  Asymmetric Information  Game Mastery Design Analysis: Assymmetric Ability
  44. 44. Why Designers Use Asymmetric Abilities  Varied Gameplay  Replayablity  Team Play (Collaboration, Negotiation)  Balances Gain Competence Goals
  45. 45. Asymmetric Play Extra Credits: Can One Game Cater To Many Play Styles?
  46. 46. What Was The Main Message Of This Video?
  47. 47. Weak vs. Strong Asymmetry Weak Asymmetry  Players share some game mechanics  Great for fostering teamwork  Abilities to use together should be obvious  Requires signals for when to use abilities Strong Asymmetry  Few or no shared game mechanics  Requires strong team communication skills  Better for varied gameplay within same boundary
  48. 48. Overcome Defeat an opposing force in a test, or series of tests, involving attributes or performance of low- level actions.
  49. 49. Overcome Tests  Combat  Timing  Rhythm-Based Actions  Dexterity-Based Actions  Memorization  Negotiation  Puzzle-Solving  Luck
  50. 50. Overcome Goal Design Considerations  Who does the player compete against?  Type of Tests  Complexity of Tests  Difficulty of Tests  Are Ties Allowed?
  51. 51. Why Designers Use Overcome Goals  Conflict  Combat  Competition  Prevents Eliminate Goals
  52. 52. Evade Avoid being captured or hit.
  53. 53. Evade Design Considerations  Enemies to be evaded  Penalties for failure to evade  Role-reversal?
  54. 54. Why Designers Use Evade Goals  Conflict  Prevents Capture Goals  Supports Traverse and Delivery Goals
  55. 55. Choose one of the following games to play: OVERCOME  Carcassonne (2-5p, 45m)  China (3-5p, 45m) EVADE  Emerald (2-5p, 45m)  Fearsome Floors (2-7, 45m)
  56. 56. Group Quest Design an analog game prototype using mechanics supporting one of the following goals:  Overcome  Evade
  57. 57. Aim and Shoot The act of taking aim at something and then shooting it.
  58. 58. Aim and Shoot Design Considerations  Turn-based or Real-Time?  Perspective  First-Person: Fairly easy, unless there is movement  Third-Person: Movement of Focus Loci is necessary for view of target  God’s View: Difficult, due to lack of Spatial Immersion  Missile Speed and Range  Moving Target or Shooter  Tools or Resources Required
  59. 59. Why Designers Use Aim and Shoot  Movement  Spatial Immersion  Balances Resources and Tools  Supports Combat with Capture, Evade or Eliminate Goals
  60. 60. Dexterity-Based Actions Actions where success or failure depends on some form of dexterity, usually hand-eye coordination.
  61. 61. Dexterity-Based Action Design Considerations  Action  Response Time
  62. 62. Why Designers Use Dexterity-Based Actions  Spatial Immersion  Sensory-Motoric Immersion  Game Mastery
  63. 63. What Determines Response Time For A Dexterity-Based Aim & Shoot Mechanic?
  64. 64. Boss Battle Ahead! There will be a test on Levels 1-3 the next time we meet!
  65. 65. Design an Aim & Shoot mechanic on the LMS.

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