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LAFS Game Mechanics - Social Mechanics

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Level 5 of the Los Angeles Film School's Game Mechanics class.

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LAFS Game Mechanics - Social Mechanics

  1. 1. Level 5 David Mullich Game Mechanics The Los Angeles Film School
  2. 2. Resources  Resources  Production  Consumption  Investments  Diminishing Returns  Resource Management
  3. 3. Construction  Construction  Extended Actions  Interruptible Actions  Ownership  Transfer of Control  Constructive Play
  4. 4. Octalysis
  5. 5. Games Are Social In Nature Even single-player ones.
  6. 6. Conflict One or more parties, often players or players against the game system, have goals that cannot be satisfied together.
  7. 7. Sources of Conflict  Combat  Overcome  Combat  Seize Control/Ownership  Combat  Capture/Evade  Combat  Construct/Destroy  Combat  Player Elimination  And don’t forget… Combat
  8. 8. Non-Combat Gaming Extra Credits: How to make social mechanics fun
  9. 9. What Was The Main Message Of This Video?
  10. 10. Simulating Social Mechanics  Time Pressure on Dialog Choices  Moves and Counter-Moves  Skill Check Against Stats  Persuasion Bar  Persuading Voters
  11. 11. Let’s Leave That To Narrative Mechanic Lecture
  12. 12. Social Interaction When two or more players have two-way communication between each other.
  13. 13. Why Designers Use Social Interaction  Emotional Immersion  Freedom of Choice  Illusion of Influence
  14. 14. Social Interaction Design Considerations  Reasons for Communicating  Get Something  Performing Collaborative Actions  Cooperation  Communication Channels  Natural  Stimulated  Pacing  Turn-Based  Real-Time
  15. 15. Competition The struggle between players or against the game system to achieve a goal where the performance of the players can be measured at least relatively.
  16. 16. Forms Of Competition  Enemies  Incompatible Goals  Preventing Goals  Rewards
  17. 17. Direct vs. Indirect Competition Direct  Overcome  King of the Hill Indirect  Races without Interference  Last Man Standing
  18. 18. Why Designers Use Competition Encourages:  Conflict  Tension  Social Status Discourages:  Cooperation  Alliances  Experimenting
  19. 19. Competition Design Considerations  Direct or Indirect?  Symmetric, Asymmetric, or Unknown ?  Outcome?
  20. 20. Player Killing When players can intentionally or unintentionally remove players from the game for at least a period of time.
  21. 21. Why Designers Use Player Killing Main Uses:  Player Elimination (but with Respawning)  Team Elimination  Score Keeping Encourages:  Risk/Reward Decisions  Social Status Affects:  Ownership  Team Balance  Team Play
  22. 22. Player Killing Design Considerations  Penalties (for being killed)  Respawning  Friendly Fire  Rewards (for killing)
  23. 23. Betrayal One or several players that have an agreement with other players intentionally fail to do as agreed or otherwise hinder the fulfillment of the agreement.
  24. 24. Betrayal Elements  Cooperation Between Players  Commitment To A Goal  Incentive For Breaking Commitment
  25. 25. Where Betrayal Can Occur  Mutual Goals  Collaborative Actions  Player-Decided Rewards
  26. 26. Why Designers Use Betrayal Promotes:  Emotional Immersion  Role-Reversal  Leap Of Faith Balances:  Negotiation  Trading  Alliances
  27. 27. Betrayal Design Considerations  What collaborative actions have a delayed effect?  What are players’ perceived chance of individual rewards for betraying another player?  Do players have asymmetric information about other player’s actions?  Can bluffing be used to conceal betrayal?
  28. 28. Cooperation Player cooperate; i.e., coordinate their actions and share resources, in order to reach goals or subgoals of the game.
  29. 29. Ways To Achieve Cooperation  Team Play  Mutual Goals With Shared Results  Shared Rewards  Collaborative Actions
  30. 30. Why Designers Use Collaboration Encourages:  Social Interaction  Alliances  Betrayal  Constructive Play Reduces:  Competition  Tension
  31. 31. Collaboration Design Considerations  Shared Resources  Mutual Goals  Shared Rewards
  32. 32. Player-Decided Results Players are responsible for deciding at least some of the results of player actions, and their decisions are not necessarily based on the rules of the game.
  33. 33. Alliances A group of players who have agreed to obey particular and specific rules of conduct toward each other and who, usually, have a shared agenda.
  34. 34. Why Designers Use Alliances Encourages:  Team Play  Social Organizations Discourages:  Competition
  35. 35. Alliances Design Considerations  What are players’ mutual goals or common enemies?  What are the rules of conduct that players can agree to?
  36. 36. Team Play Players in a group or team coordinate their actions, abilities and roles in order to reach a common goal.
  37. 37. Ways To Use Team Play  Avatars In Multiplayer Games  Units in Single Player Games
  38. 38. Why Designers Use Team Play Encourages:  Social Interaction  Cooperation  Collaborative Actions  Constructive Play Discourages:  Betrayal
  39. 39. Team Play Design Considerations  What is the mutual goal and its rewards?  What are the shared resources?  Do teams form at the beginning of the play session, or dynamically during gameplay?  Does team play occur between players or is it simulated through units?  How does each team member feel important and significant?
  40. 40. Trading Players exchange a resource, whether it is information, actions, or game elements, between each other or the game system.
  41. 41. Why Designers Use Trading Encourages:  Social Interaction  Cooperation  Alternate Strategies For Progression  Avoiding Strategies For Blocking Player Progression Balances:  Resources
  42. 42. Trading Design Considerations  Resources to be Traded  Incentive  Initiation (Offer)  Bargaining (Optional)  Resolution (Exchange) Special Cases:  Ransom  Gifts
  43. 43. Bidding Players invest resources, usually some kind of currency, for an uncertain outcome in order to get a reward of some kind.
  44. 44. Why Designers Use Bidding Encourages:  Competition For Resources  Player-Defined Goals  Transfer Of Control Of Resources  Conversion Of Resources  Trade-Offs  Alternate Strategy To Combat
  45. 45. Bidding Design Considerations  Are player bids known to other players?  What order do players bid in?  Can players negotiate during bidding?  Can players be eliminated during bidding?  How does bidding end?  How is outcome determined? Special Cases:  Auctions  Voting
  46. 46. Bluffing Players have a possibility to convey false information to other players in order to benefit from their situation.
  47. 47. Why Designers Use Bluffing Encourages:  Betrayal  Makes Trading, Betting, Bidding More Complex  Social Skills To Random Situations
  48. 48. Bluffing Design Considerations  What asymmetric information can be the basis for bluffing?  How is false information indirectly communicated from one player to another?  What are the rewards and penalties for bluffing?
  49. 49. Eliminate Remove a game element from its location in the game space.
  50. 50. Examples Of Elimination  Remove An Element That Hinders Player Actions  Remove A Threat To The Player’s Goals  Removal Is A Goal Itself
  51. 51. Why Designers Use Elimination Goals  Turn Player Into a Consumer of Game Elements  Prevent Opponent’s Survive or Evade Goals  Speed Up and Simplify End Game Encourages:  Conflict  Tension  High-Level Closures
  52. 52. Eliminate Design Considerations  What game element is eliminated?  How is the elimination achieved?  Is the elimination permanent?
  53. 53. Rescue The goal of freeing someone or something that is guarded.
  54. 54. Why Designers Use Rescue Goals  Prevents Guard Goals  Narrative Structure Encourages:  Conflict
  55. 55. Rescue Design Considerations  What/who must be rescued?  What obstacles must be overcome?  Does the hostage need to be moved to a safe area?  Do the players have other goals besides rescuing?
  56. 56. Choose one of the following games to play:  Boomtown (3-5p, 30m)  *Cartagena the Escape (2-5p, 30m)  Colossal Arena (2-5p, 40-60m)  For Sale (3-6p, 20-30m)  Forbidden Island (2-4p, 30m)  Money (3-5p, 20-30m)  *Pandemic (2-4p, 45m)  *Quo Vadis (3-5p, 45m)  Space Alert (1-5p, 30m)  The Downfall of Pompeii (2-4p, 45)
  57. 57. Group Quest Design an analog game prototype using mechanics supporting one of the following goals:  Eliminate  Rescue
  58. 58. Negotiation A situation where the players confer with each other in order to reach an agreement or settlement.
  59. 59. Examples of Negotiations  Collaborate Actions  Players Exchanging Resources  Deciding When To Use Asymmetric Abilities  Deciding When To Use Shared Resources  Player-Decided Results  Deciding On Handicaps For Balancing
  60. 60. Why Designers Use Negotiations Encourages:  Social Interaction  Transfer of Control  Alliances  Game Mastery  Engagement During Downtime Balances:  Players
  61. 61. Negotiation Design Considerations  How are negotiations initiated?  How does bargaining occur?  How are agreements reached?  Can third parties interrupt the negotiation?  How are agreement breaches handled?
  62. 62. Player Negotiation Scenarios
  63. 63. Social Dilemma Players tend to compete against each other even though cooperation would be best for all involved.
  64. 64. Why Designers Use Social Dilemmas Encourages:  Betrayal  Tension  Risk/Reward Decisions Balances:  Alliances
  65. 65. Social Dilemma Design Considerations  What are the shared penalties for cooperating?  What are the individual rewards for betrayal?
  66. 66. Research and use the LMS to report on games using group activities discussed in class.

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