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LAFS Game Mechanics - Resource Management Mechanics

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Level 4 of the Los Angeles Film School's Game Mechanics class.

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LAFS Game Mechanics - Resource Management Mechanics

  1. 1. Level 4 David Mullich Game Mechanics The Los Angeles Film School
  2. 2. Tactics vs. Strategy
  3. 3. Objects  Units  Enemies  Bosses  Strategic Locations
  4. 4. Actions  Combat  Aim & Shoot  Dexterity-Based Actions
  5. 5. Action Control  Limited Set of Actions  Decreased Abilities  Ability Losses  Asymmetric Abilities
  6. 6. Goals  Overcome  Evade
  7. 7. Boss Battle Time! There will now be a test on Levels 1-3!
  8. 8. What Are Resources?
  9. 9. Resources Objects used by players to enable actions in the game.
  10. 10. Resources Design Considerations  Actions Fueled  Consumption/Conver sion  Resource Production  Player Resource Distribution  Resource Storage  Resource Control Design Analysis: Resources
  11. 11. How Resources Are Produced  Starting Items  Collection  Conversion  Rewards Design Analysis: Resource Production
  12. 12. How Resources Are Consumed  Actions  Construction  Conversion  Destruction Design Analysis: Resource Concumption
  13. 13. Are Houses And Hotels A Resource?
  14. 14. Is Energy In Role-Playing Games A Resource?
  15. 15. Energy Systems Extra Credits: Playtime-limiting systems often found in social games
  16. 16. What Was The Main Message Of This Video?
  17. 17. Bad Uses Of Energy Systems  Habituation  Content Restrictions  Monetization
  18. 18. Better Use Of Resources  Measure Progress  Create Strategic Areas  Support Ownership, Collecting, Area Control, and Exploration (with Hidden Resources) Goals  Balance Players, Units, Construction, Area Control, Game World  Resource Management
  19. 19. Resource Management When the players have to plan, manage and control resources within the game in order to reach the game’s goals.
  20. 20. Resource Management Design Considerations  Resource Limitations  Resource Renewability  Risk/Reward Tradeoffs
  21. 21. Why Designers Use Resource Management  Cognitive Immersion  Strategic Planning  Risk/Rewards  Freedom of Choice  Balances Complexity
  22. 22. Producer-Consumer Determines the lifetime of game objects, usually resources, and thus governs the flow of gameplay.
  23. 23. Producer-Consumer Design Considerations  Object Production  Object Consumption  Player Control of Production and/or Consumption  Producer-Consumer Chains  Container Limits
  24. 24. Why Designers Use Producer- Consumers  Resource Management  Varied Gameplay  Balancing Complexity, Resources, Units Warning! Lengthy could conflict with  Predictable Consequences  Illusion of Influence
  25. 25. Ownership Dictates which and how players have access to resources and other game elements.
  26. 26. Ownership Design Considerations  Attainment  Benefits/Penalties  Player Sharing  Permanent  Beyond Game Ownership Design Analysis: Ownership
  27. 27. Why Designers Use Ownership  Rewards  Balances Resources, Strategic Locations, Units, Resource Management, Conflict  Support Goals of Gain Ownership, Capture, Rescue, Collection, Area Control  Emotional Immersion
  28. 28. Construction Introduction new game objects that are presented as intentional constructions in the game world.
  29. 29. Construction Design Considerations  Objects Produced  How Produced  Resources/Skills Needed  Chance For Success  Design Variations
  30. 30. Why Game Designers Use Construction  Sensory-Motor Immersion  Gain Ownership  Investments  Creative Control
  31. 31. Constructive Play Based on putting game elements together to construct new kinds of game element configurations, which might have different emergent characteristics.
  32. 32. Constructive Play Design Considerations  Construction Complexity  Dynamic Systems Design Analysis: Constructive Play
  33. 33. Why Designers Use Constructive Play  Cognitive Immersion  Player Defined Goals  Experimenting  Player-Constructed Worlds
  34. 34. Transfer of Control When the influence over a game element is passed from one player to another.
  35. 35. Transfer of Control Design Considerations  Objects Transferred  Resources  Tools  Units  Can objects be uncontrolled?  Do players focus on owning few or many?  Is control based on collaboration or conflict?  Is transfer of control total or not? Design Analysis: Transfer of Control
  36. 36. Why Designers Use Transfer of Control  Ownership  Emotional Immersion  Privileged Abilities  Strategic Knowledge  Varied Gameplay  Collaborative Actions  Balance Resources, Tools, Units  Support of Goals Gain Ownership, Collection, Area Control, Capture
  37. 37. Extended Actions Actions that take so long to complete that they require players to miss opportunities to perform other actions in order to complete them.
  38. 38. Examples of Extended Actions Player  Dexterity-Based Actions  Combo Actions Non-Player  Resource Generators  Chargers
  39. 39. Extended Actions Design Considerations  Focus Loci Performing Action  Action Time Length  Is It Interruptible?  Time To Take Full Effect
  40. 40. Why Designers Use Extended Actions  Delayed Actions and Effects  Attention Swapping  Risk/Reward  Balances  Resource Generators  Chargers  Privileged Abilities  Collaborative Actions Warning! Can cause Downtime!
  41. 41. Interruptible Actions Actions that can be interrupted before they affect the game state.
  42. 42. Turn-Based vs. Real-Time Games Turn-Based  Changes to Turn-Taking Sequences Real-Time  Extended Actions with Delayed Effects
  43. 43. Interruptible Actions Design Considerations  What action can be interrupted?  Who can interrupt it?  How is it interrupted?  How delayed is the effect?
  44. 44. Why Designers Use Interrupting Actions  Attention Swapping  Balancing  Irreversible Actions (e.g., Blocking)  Combos
  45. 45. Gain Ownership The goal to gain ownership of a game element.
  46. 46. Ways To Gain Ownership  Game Start  Rewards  Pick Up  Capture  Construction  Trading
  47. 47. Gain Ownership Design Considerations  How is ownership achieved?  What does ownership provide?  Is it destroyed when taken?  Is owner known?  Can ownership be changed or shared?  Is it linked to a movable or non-moveable game object?
  48. 48. Why Designers Use Gain Ownership Goals  Conflict  Transfer of Control  Resources for Resource Management  Progress for Collection Goals  Balances:  Ownership  Enemies
  49. 49. Collection The completion of several goals that together form a coherent unit.
  50. 50. Collectible Design Considerations  What is to be collected?  How varied can collected items be?  Is the collection a subgoal of another collection?
  51. 51. Why Designers Use Collection Goals  Quests  Transfer of Control  End Goal
  52. 52. Choose one of the following games to play:  Dragon’s Gold (3-6p, 30m)  Drive (2-4p, 30m)  For Sale (3-6p, 20-30m)  High Society (3-5p, 30-45m)  Medici (3-6p, 45m)  Priests of Ra (2-5p, 60m)  Qwirkle (2-4p, 30-45m)  San Juan (2-4p, 45-60m)  *Settlers of Catan (3-4p, 60m)  Thief of Baghdad (2-4p, 45m) (Collection)  Ticket to Ride Europe (2-5p, 30-60m)  Zooloretto (2-5p, 45m)
  53. 53. Group Quest Design an analog game prototype using mechanics supporting one of the following goals:  Gain Ownership  Collection
  54. 54. Investment Committing resources for a certain amount of time to something in order to reap the rewards later.
  55. 55. Investment Design Considerations  Resources Invested  Rewards Produced  Maturation TIme  Ratio of Investment-to- Rewards  Reward Randomness Design Analysis: Investments
  56. 56. Why Designers Use Investment  Strategic Planning  Delayed Effects  Balances Resources, Skills
  57. 57. Diminishing Returns The returns for similar investments decrease as the player progresses in the game.
  58. 58. Diminishing Rewards Design Considerations  Diminishment Rate
  59. 59. Why Designers Use Diminishing Returns  Balancing Character Development  Limit Effectiveness of Renewable Resources  Promote Varied Gameplay  Create Tension through Interferable Actions  Prevent Analysis Paralysis (Real-Time Games)
  60. 60. Design an Investment mechanic with diminishing returns on the LMS.

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