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LAFS Game Mechanics - Replayability

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Level 10 of the Los Angeles Film School's Game Mechanics class.

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LAFS Game Mechanics - Replayability

  1. 1. Level 10 David Mullich Game Mechanics The Los Angeles Film School
  2. 2. Single-Player Game Balancing  Single-Player Balancing  Difficulty  Complexity  Smooth Learning Curve
  3. 3. Multi-Player Game Balancing  Multi-Player Balancing  Balancing Effects  Symmetry  Rock-Paper-Scissors  Handicaps  Team Balance
  4. 4. Game Mastery  Game Mastery  Smooth Learning Curves  Empowerment
  5. 5. Boss Battle Time! There will now be a test on Levels 7-9!
  6. 6. Replayablity The level to which a game provides new challenges or experiences when played again.
  7. 7. Why Designers Want Replayablity  Promotes Game Mastery Warning! Can conflict with:  Exploration  Memorization  Surprises  Tension  Puzzle Solving  Narrative Structures  Unknown Goals
  8. 8. Replayable Challenges  Variety of Challenges  Asymmetric Goals  Player-Selected Goals
  9. 9. Replayable Solutions  Asymmetric Abilities  Optional Goals  Reversibility  Experimenting
  10. 10. Trans-Game Information  Scores  High Score List  Near Miss Indicators  Strategic Information
  11. 11. Replayablity Design Considerations  Are challenges different between game instances?  Can challenges be solved in different ways?  Can players compare results between games?
  12. 12. Varied Gameplay The game provides variety in gameplay, either within a single play session or between different game sessions.
  13. 13. Why Designers Use Varied Gameplay Encourages:  Replayablity  Freedom of Choice  Competency Areas Balances:  Level of Difficulty  Narrative Structures  Game Mastery Warning! May conflict with:  Sensory-Motoric Immersion  Game Mastery  Quick Games
  14. 14. Varying Actions  Budget Action Points  Converters and Producer-Consumer Chains  Sets of Skills  Transfer of Control of Tools and Controllers  Dynamic Alliances  Ability Losses
  15. 15. Varying Goals  Selectable Goals  Supporting Goals  Games within Games
  16. 16. Varied Gameplay Within Sessions  Can players perform different actions?  Can players choose between different goals?
  17. 17. Varied Gameplay Between Sessions  Does the game world change between instances?  Does the player’s goals change between instances?  Can players choose what type of asymmetric abilities they have?  Can players develop characters?  Can players form teams?
  18. 18. Meta Games A game based on the effects and outcomes of other games.
  19. 19. Meta Games That Are Part Of The Game  Optional Goals  Easter Eggs  Scores and High Score Lists  Scores of Game within Games  Handicap
  20. 20. Meta Games That Are Independent Of Game  Best of 3 in Rock-Paper-Scissors  Guessing the Outcome  Betting  Ownership of Trophies and other Real- World Objects  Team Development
  21. 21. Why Designers Like Meta Games  Provides Extra-Game Consequences  Results in Trans-Game Information  Changes Single-Player into Multiplayer  Minimizes Luck  Modifies Risk-Reward Choices  Allows Spectators to become Players
  22. 22. Meta Games Design Configurations  Is the meta game designed to be an part of the underlying game?  Is the meta game independent of the underlying game?
  23. 23. Student Course Evaluation https://tinyurl.com/lafs-game-dec17
  24. 24. Group Quest Conduct playtesting at Game Fair for the game you balanced in the last class session.
  25. 25. Use the LMS to report on what you learned from Game Fair playtesting.

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