Teacher's Guide to International Collaboration

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Teacher's Guide to International Collaboration

  1. 1. Teacher’s Guide to International Collaboration Ray Myers Senior Analyst Office of Educational Technology Department of Education Diane Midness Director of Professional Development iEARN-USA Adrienne Michetti Ed Tech Researcher and Content Designer
  2. 2. Teacher’s Guide to International Collaboration Teacher’s Guide to International Collaboration My students get more motivated in the whole process of learning and are more aware of their roles in the global world! http://www2.ed.gov/teachers/how/tech/international/index.html
  3. 3. Teacher’s Guide to International Collaboration Rationale “. . . [I]n this interconnected world, our country risks being disconnected from the contributions of other countries and cultures. Through education and exchange, we can become better collaborators and competitors in the global economy.” -- Secretary Duncan’s speech to the Council on Foreign Relations, May 26, 2010
  4. 4. 4 Learning Powered by Technology •Ray Myers •Office of Education Technology •U.S. Department of Education 4
  5. 5. 5 21st century expertise How people learn Personalized learning Universal Design for Learning Informal + Formal 5 Learning
  6. 6. 6 All learners will have engaging and empowering learning experiences both in and outside of school that prepare them to be active, creative, knowledgeable, and ethical participants in our globally networked society. Goal 1.0: Learning
  7. 7. 7 Highly “effective” Connected Online Informal + Formal Inspired Teaching
  8. 8. 8 Professional educators will be supported individually and in teams by technology that connects them to data, content, resources, expertise, and learning experiences that can empower and inspire them to provide more effective teaching for all learners. Goal 3.0: Teaching
  9. 9. Teacher’s Guide to International Collaboration Table of Contents 1. Introduction and Background •Why international collaboration? •Why project-based learning? 2. Resources for Cross-cultural Interaction and Project Work •Global Organizations and Networks •International Regional Networks •Content Resources 3. Project Work to Enhance Language Skills 4. Music and Graphic Arts Project Examples I believe it can build tolerance and decrease prejudice toward others by letting students see each other as similar to themselves despite the differences in culture, geography, religion, etc.-Mike Kaechele
  10. 10. Teacher’s Guide to International Collaboration Table of Contents (cont’d) 5. Creative and Language Arts Project Examples 6. Science/Math/Environment Project Examples 7. Social Studies Project Examples 8. Tutorials and Guides •Guides for Getting Started •Web 2.0 Tools for International Collaboration •Professional Development Opportunities 9. Tips and Helpful Suggestions 10. Post-Secondary Opportunities •Post-Secondary Programs working with K-12 schools •Post-Secondary International Collaboration 11. Credits and Acknowledgments
  11. 11. Teacher’s Guide to International Collaboration Project Based Learning Authentic audience; students really begin to understand that their thoughts matter to other people.
  12. 12. Teacher’s Guide to International Collaboration Resources Get kids involved globally because the world is global. In our ever shrinking, technologically connected spaces, it is vital that students have an understanding of the globe, the people and the cultures they can learn from. Our way of looking at things is only one way, there is much to be learned from others.-Clarence Fisher •Global Organizations and Networks •International Regional Networks •Content Resources
  13. 13. Teacher’s Guide to International Collaboration Sample Highlighted Projects Students ask authentic questions that cannot always be answered with simple internet research - for example it’s possible for students to look up temperatures across the globe, but to actually ask students “what are you wearing today” and see the different answers from places as far apart as South Africa, India and Canada shows students how the weather affects aspects of daily life in those countries.-Maggie Hos-McGrane •CIESE Science/Engineering Projects •Rock Our World •Learning Circles •Our Footprints, Our Future (OF)2 •Global Art •Global Dreamers
  14. 14. Teacher’s Guide to International Collaboration Tutorials and Guides As the global project is not just worked out on one’s side, it requires participating teachers’ mutual trust and understanding in the facilitation of the design and implementation of the project. •Guides for getting started •Web 2.0 Tools for International Collaboration •Professional Development Opportunities
  15. 15. Teacher’s Guide to International Collaboration Tips and Helpful Information A project is not inherently valuable because it is global, it is valuable because it is collaborative. Just like everything else, think global act local. Jabiz Raisdana •Top Ten Tips for International Online Collaboration •Frequently Asked Questions •Suggestions and Testimonials from Educators
  16. 16. Teacher’s Guide to International Collaboration Post Secondary Opportunities My students get more motivated in the whole process of learning and are more aware of their roles in the global world! •Post-Secondary Programs working with k-12 schools •Post-Secondary International Collaboration
  17. 17. Teacher’s Guide to International Collaboration Contact Information Adrienne Michetti adrienne.michetti@gmail.com http://twitter.com/amichetti Diane Midness iEARN-USA dmidness@us.iearn.org http://twitter.com/iearn.usa Ray Myers Ed Tech Department http://www.ed.gov/technology http://twitter.com/officeofedtech To be notified when the revised Teacher’s Guide is updated contact Diane Midness dmidness@us.iearn.org
  18. 18. Teacher’s Guide to International Collaboration

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