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Overview

Introduction

Childhood

School and Career

Parenting

Blindness Resources
and Organizations
Introduction (1 of 2)

Born with bilateral microophthalmia

Had some vision in right eye until age 3.

Had many surgeri...
Introduction (2 of 2)

Went to college, got a Master's degree, got married and had a
baby, and now work as a genetic coun...
Parents are SO Important!

Even if you think you don’t know how to solve a
problem or what’s best for your child, you are...
Early Childhood

“You’re talking to me
about college, now?
My baby’s only six
months old!”

Early interventionists
and t...
Early Intervention

Get your child involved in early intervention
services provided by the state.

Enroll your child in ...
The School Years

Enroll your child in pre-school early to expose
him/her to other children as much as possible.

Think ...
Learning Braille

Braille is one of the
things that will
contribute to your
child’s success in
school and as an adult.

...
Advocate for your Child

IEP’s (Individualized Education Plans) will be a large
part of the way your child’s education is...
Self Advocacy

Advocating for your child early on will help them
learn to advocate for themselves later

Being part of a...
There’s More to Life Than School
Encourage your child to get involved in
hobbies.
Some of my hobbies include music, dancin...
Swimming and Diving
Playing the Piano
Skiing
Waterskiing
Independent Living Skills

These are the most important
skills because school does not
teach you how to live
independentl...
Independent Travel skills

Traveling independently is a
lifelong skill.

My parents knew it was important,
but it was no...
Recipe for Success
All these skills that your child will learn will
contribute to their success.
I credit my parents more ...
Blind Parenting
My most recent challenge and
joy has been becoming a
mother. My son Alex was born
in 2011.
Just as with ev...
Blind Mom Friends
Resources
National Federation of the Blind
• Parents of Blind Children division
• Career Divisions
• Student Division
• Me...
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Ican presentation 2013

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Ican presentation 2013

  1. 1. Overview  Introduction  Childhood  School and Career  Parenting  Blindness Resources and Organizations
  2. 2. Introduction (1 of 2)  Born with bilateral microophthalmia  Had some vision in right eye until age 3.  Had many surgeries in those three years including cornea transplant.  Totally blind by age 3 and enrolled in pre- school for blind children.
  3. 3. Introduction (2 of 2)  Went to college, got a Master's degree, got married and had a baby, and now work as a genetic counselor in California.  However, today’s talk will focus on:  My experiences growing up as a blind child and what helped me be successful.  Resources and organizations for parents of blind children
  4. 4. Parents are SO Important!  Even if you think you don’t know how to solve a problem or what’s best for your child, you are the most important person in your child’s life.  You know your child best and until they are older, you will be the only one to fight for them, and it’s true that “they will thank you later.”
  5. 5. Early Childhood  “You’re talking to me about college, now? My baby’s only six months old!”  Early interventionists and teachers make a big impression.  High expectations are the key to success.
  6. 6. Early Intervention  Get your child involved in early intervention services provided by the state.  Enroll your child in pre-school early.  Expose your child to as many experiences as possible.  Parents are even more important than teachers.
  7. 7. The School Years  Enroll your child in pre-school early to expose him/her to other children as much as possible.  Think about how you’d treat a sighted child and treat your blind child similarly.
  8. 8. Learning Braille  Braille is one of the things that will contribute to your child’s success in school and as an adult.  Make sure they are taught braille and use it in their classroom.  Even if large print is an option, it is not as efficient as braille.
  9. 9. Advocate for your Child  IEP’s (Individualized Education Plans) will be a large part of the way your child’s education is planned.  Be an advocate for your child - speak up during IEP’s.  If you think something is inaccurate or you want something changed, say so.  When your child is old enough, include them in their own IEP.  Having high expectations will affect their success and how they see themselves.
  10. 10. Self Advocacy  Advocating for your child early on will help them learn to advocate for themselves later  Being part of an IEP.  Asking for materials in braille when they need them.  Preparing for college where there are less services available sometimes.  Knowing when you need help and knowing how to ask for it.
  11. 11. There’s More to Life Than School Encourage your child to get involved in hobbies. Some of my hobbies include music, dancing, and reading. Expose your child to many things, since not all of them will work out as well. For example: I'm glad I learned to ski, but it's not something I enjoy today.
  12. 12. Swimming and Diving
  13. 13. Playing the Piano
  14. 14. Skiing
  15. 15. Waterskiing
  16. 16. Independent Living Skills  These are the most important skills because school does not teach you how to live independently.  Expect your child to do chores around the house.  Dishes, laundry, setting the table, cooking dinner.  The more you expect them to do, the more normal it will seem to them that they learn to do these things.
  17. 17. Independent Travel skills  Traveling independently is a lifelong skill.  My parents knew it was important, but it was not one of the things I enjoyed learning.  Expect your child to take public transportation at an age-appropriate time.  Advocate for mobility lessons especially early .
  18. 18. Recipe for Success All these skills that your child will learn will contribute to their success. I credit my parents more than anyone in my life for ensuring I had these skills before entering college. I was successful in college and grad school because of my determination, my self advocacy skills and my belief in myself as a capable blind person.
  19. 19. Blind Parenting My most recent challenge and joy has been becoming a mother. My son Alex was born in 2011. Just as with everything else, I do some things differently but am just as capable as a sighted parent. I make the same mistakes, have the same worries and fears and have the same joys.
  20. 20. Blind Mom Friends
  21. 21. Resources National Federation of the Blind • Parents of Blind Children division • Career Divisions • Student Division • Meet successful blind adults Also: • American Council of the Blind, • Lighthouse for the Blind • Other local organizations

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