Проактивное управление проектами в средеMicrosoft® Visual Studio®2010<br />Дмитрий Андреев<br />Twitter: @dmandreev<br />
Development Leads and LeadersPeople who manage teams and individual contributor influentials<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<b...
S2S: Situation to Solution<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />SITUATION<br />Successful software projects manifest themselve...
Счастливые команды создают великий софт<br />Качественные коммуникации<br />Прозрачность<br />Удовлетворенность<br />
Проектное управление<br />В общем это болезненно<br />Не реальные сроки<br />«Ресурсы» а не люди<br />
?<br />Не должно ли это быть …<br />люди а не процессы?<br />работающий софта не документация к продукту?<br />кооперацияа...
Фундаментальные принципы<br />Фокус на людях<br />Надежный софт<br />Счастливые клиенты<br />
Visual Studio 2010 позволит вам…<br />Планироватьпроектыс уверенностью<br />Вести проекты с большей прозрачностью<br />Диа...
Планируйте более Аккуратно<br />
Планировать тяжело<br />Оценка даже в лучшем случае это угадывание.<br />Очень трудно понять сколько еще предстоит работы<...
Рабочая тетрадь планирования<br />Поддержка Agile «из коробки».<br />Создана на основе лучших практик.<br />Два раздела:<b...
Список задач проекта<br />Файл Excel.<br />Интегрированный с Team Foundation Server.<br />Позволяет вам легко вводить поль...
Планирование итерации<br />Сравнение текущего плана с предыдущими результатами.<br />Позволяет легко балансировать на уров...
Демонстрация: Agile Workbooks<br />
Выполняйте проекты Прозрачно<br />
Предвидение – это искусство видеть то что не видно другим.<br />Джонатан Свифт.<br />
Правильные средства<br />Отслеживайте прогресс зная чем занимается ваша команда.<br />Собирайте данные постоянно.<br />Сре...
Отслеживание задач<br />Рабочие элементы интегрированы в весь процесс.<br />Задачи и их статусы меняются с каждым действие...
Всё взаимосвязано<br />Раборчие элементы предоставляют возможность отследить все связи.<br />Отношения выявляют ранние инд...
Управляйте работой где угодно<br />
Демонстрация: Рабочие элементы повсеместно<br />
Проверяйте проекты прозрачно<br />
Что только что случилось?<br />Составление отчетов сложная и длительная задача.<br />Необходимые данные трудно собрать и е...
Работающие средства<br />SQL Server 2008 Reporting Services из коробки<br />Функциональность!<br />Отчеты Excel на основе ...
Отчеты на базе SQL Server Reporting Services<br />Другие отчеты в этой категории<br />Прогресс показан в соотношении с сце...
Отчеты Rich SQL Server Reporting Services<br />Вопросы на которые отвечает этот отчет<br />Дополнительные параметры для ут...
Отчеты на базе Excel<br />Простые в использовании средства.<br />Низкие затраты<br />Знакомый инструмент<br />Легко менять...
Информационные панелиSharePoint<br />Выбирайте…<br />SharePoint Foundation<br />SharePoint Server<br />Готовые панели из к...
Информационные панели SharePoint<br />
Готовы ли мы выпустить продукт?<br />Какой у нас прогресс по тестовым планам?<br />Как изменяется наш проект?<br />Исправл...
Демонстрация: Отчетность<br />
Visual Studio 2010 позволит вам…<br />Планироватьпроектыс уверенностью<br />Вести проекты с большей прозрачностью<br />Диа...
Вопросы?<br />
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Проактивное управление проектами в среде Microsoft Visual Studio 2010

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В этой сессии мы рассмотрим ряд возможностей Visual Studio 2010, которые помогают управлять, осуществлять коммуникации, отслеживать работы, а также создавать отчеты по статусам проекта и ключевым показателям производительности на протяжении всего жизненного цикла проекта. Вы увидите новую «Книгу гибкого планирования» в Visual Studio 2010, а также новые средства создания отчетности, например информационные панели Microsoft® Office SharePoint® Server.

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  • Walk-in slide. Advance to the next slide to begin the presentation.
  • HIDDEN SLIDE FOR SPEAKER PREP ONLYAudience Definition:Development Leads and LeadersWhat are they like?Software developers are problem solvers, tinkerers, artists and engineers all rolled up in one. No matter what they are building there is some element of it—or all of it—that is new. They love their job when stuff they are getting something and their work is not fragmented. Development takes clear thinking time, so they don’t want constant interruptions. Development leads understand this and don’t want to bug their team constantly for updates.Why are they here?There has been a lot of buzz about agile development and they want to learn more. It would be great if it lived up to the promises to help them deliver projects more successfully, without focusing on being a project manager or inflicting a lot of work on the team. Many are in the process of adopting agile practices—Scrum in particular. They are looking for tools to help. Some in the audience may have already tried adopting agile practices, but they could be experiencing issues. They need tools, or have possibly started using tools, and they’d like to know why one toolset is better than another is.What keeps them up at night?Are they going to deliver a quality project on time? What do they need to know now to course correct and get there? What can they do to reduce the risk and be more sure of this? There are so many factors out of their control. Something unexpected always comes up every project cycle and they have to firefight to get through it. Many projects outright fail and don’t deliver. This is one of their greatest concerns.How can you solve their problem?Automation of simple tasks makes them happen (e.g., developer updates a work-item, which updates a report). Planning tools help estimation and work allocation. Reporting tools boost certainly on delivery. Work item integration with Microsoft Project, and custom reports, ‘open the kimono’ to others. This results in less random requests of the team.What do you want them to do?Try it out for themselves: play with the tools, pilot a small project on your team, drive a rollout in your team.How might they resist?Team Foundation Server is too heavyweight: way too much to learn, too much stuff. It’s not “Scrum” enough. Many tools are more scenario focused (with less flexibility), and have features like planning boards and task-boards. Where are those?I’ve tried Scrum before in my org and it was a disaster. I don’t want to do anything like that ever again.How can you best reach them?Honesty. This doesn’t create world peace. Be clear about what it does and what it doesn’t do. They love to know how other people were successful: our adopters, internal dog food efforts, how we rolled it out, how it can work for teams of all sizes. They will read books, and case studies more so then developers. They want to enhance themselves and not just write code.
  • HIDDEN SLIDE FOR SPEAKER PREP ONLYSituationSuccessful software projects manifest themselves when teams work together. When a team has good communication and transparency, it tends to find problems sooner. Teams want to come to work and are excited about what they’re building when things are going right. Those in the audience have heard that many successful projects are using agile techniques. They want to know if Visual Studio and Team Foundation Server mixed with agile can help bring success to their team. The bottom line is they want success but they don’t want to spend tons of time managing projects. They really want to focus on getting work done.ProblemSimply put, project management has often been about magic formulas and predictions without regard for team dynamics. Detached individuals providing unrealistic schedules based upon inaccurate data. Add to that micromanagement and a disregard for the humans—they’re people not resources. Finally, there’s a general lack of good, integrated tools. This has made it difficult for the development leads and leaders to (a) plan accurately in order to deliver on time, (b) have visibility into the project as it is running to discover indicators of potential issues, and (c) easily report on project status and health during and after the project.ImplicationThey can hear the sounds of the Agile Manifesto ringing in the ears. In the industry, we’ve found many ways get more work done. The Manifesto calls them out well: individuals over processes; working software over documentation; customer collaboration over contract negotiation; responding to change over following a plan. Whether they’re doing agile or not, they ultimately want to focus on the people, both their team and customers. They want to ship working software on time. They want to start doing that today.SolutionVisual Studio 2010 and Team Foundation Server enable you to easily plan projects. This integrated set of tools lets you leverage historical data so you can continuously improve your planning effort. They help you gain visibility into projects in flight. This provides easy discovery of indicators of potential issues. And, it lets you report on project status and health with an integrated application lifecycle management solution. This ensures you won’t be disrupted, or disrupt others, in order to provide information about the project to key stakeholders.
  • Welcome, I’m glad you’re here. My guess is that you can agree with me that happy teams can build great software. But, where do happy teams come from? It’s not magic. You build happy teams by starting with happy team members. Team members that are excited to come to work. Team members that have a good relationship built on great communication. Happy team members are those that derive satisfaction from a job well done. They receive satisfaction when they ship something that’s valuable and useful for the target customer. Whether that customer is internal or external. But how to you manage a happy team? You may have heard about agile software development practices. You may be doing it or have even tried doing it in the past. You may wonder if agile and Visual Studio with Team Foundation Server could help make your team a happy team. My guess is you also wonder if you can spend less time being a project manager and spend more time on shipping a great product. After all, project management is meant to help you ship. You really don’t want to spend more time than you have to on managing the project.
  • For many of us, project management is often more about pain. Often this pain comes from outside your team. External forces create your schedule from a tool where it applies magic formulas to predict an end date. Now, it’s not really the tool’s fault. Often the problem is that the input provided comes from inaccurate data, data that has no insight into a team’s dynamics. Let’s face it, when they define your team members as resources and not as persons, it’s hard to expect success from a project plan. A plan that once in motion, is micro managed. This micro management ultimately affects you and your team’s ability to get work done.
  • Shouldn’t building software be more about individuals and interactions over process and tools? Shouldn’t it be about creating working software that customers can use rather than comprehensive documentation? Wouldn’t it be better if the development team was able to focus on collaboration with customers rather than contract and feature negotiations? Wouldn’t it be great if your team was able to respond to change rather than just sticking to “the plan”?
  • Some of you might recognize what I’m talking about. Some of you may already be successfully doing just that. If it sounded like Agile, you’re right! I took the things I just paraphrased from the Agile Manifesto. A manifesto defined on solid principles. Principles you could apply to Waterfall, CMMI, or any other process. After all, shouldn’t the focus be on the people? You don’t have to believe in agile to want to build better software that is more reliable. The process you use doesn’t change your goal of making your customers happy does it? In the end it takes a willingness to stand up and take some leadership in hand. Even within a larger managed structure, you can do some lightweight project management. You can create a plan and protect your team from much of the overriding nonsense that seems to permeate most software projects today. We’ve been continuously working to help you get there. With Visual Studio Team System 2008, we helped you and your team’s individual productivity with queues of work: bugs, tasks, etc. You had transparency into the work progress of others on your team who were working to produce the product. With a great, integrated check-in experience, your team was able to feed the reporting infrastructure so that status updates were automatic. And across your entire project, you have team-level transparency through the integrated SQL Server reporting warehouse. But we’ve been busy.
  • With Visual Studio 2010 and Team Foundation Server 2010 were going to bring more help. Today, you’re going to see three ways that you can plan your projects with confidence using new Agile planning tools. How you can run projects with greater visibility with more quality reports, stakeholder dashboards, and across the board improvements in the out-of-the-box reports. And you can course correct your projects by diagnosing the root causes of issues your team is having with reports, queries and new Excel-based reporting features. You can slice and dice the data to determine the best response. Adapt and respond so you can eliminate the pain.
  • Let’s start with how you can plan projects more accurately and reduce some of the project management friction you most likely are facing now.
  • This is almost a Homer Simpson moment. Doh! Yes, planning software projects is hard. You’re in a constant state of change. When you sit down and start creating estimates, you’re often making your best guess. Granted, it might be guess supported by experience but ultimately unless you’re building the same over, there will be variables that you can’t foresee. It’s difficult to know how much you can do per cycle. Every feature, every user story, has its own unique set of constraints that affect delivery. Often, there’s a failure to plan for interruptions. Part of this problem comes from not knowing the team, not knowing the team as people instead of as resources.
  • In Visual Studio 2010, we’ve created a new feature known as Agile Planning Workbooks. We designed these new Microsoft Excel workbooks to give you a great out-of-the-box experience to help you manage your product backlog and to plan your iterations or sprints. You’ll use the Excel workbooks to manipulate your project data but it will all be stored in Team Foundation Server for centralized access and reporting. The two workbooks provided are the Product Backlog workbook and the Iteration Backlog workbook. These two workbooks are part of the updated MSF for Agile 5.0 process template.
  • You’ll start your planning process with the Product Backlog workbook. Using this workbook, you’ll start defining your user stories, aka requirements or scenarios. You’re going to assign a stack rank to each user story, which represents the relative priority of a story to other stories on the list. Next, you’ll work out the story points for each story. Story points can be anything. This forces you to use relative estimating, the relative effort of the task rather than the specific duration. They key to story points is that they should be additive units that everyone agrees on. You want to avoid mapping hours directly to story points. Understand that your Product Backlog is dynamic and evolving. You’re not attempting to figure out everything at the beginning. In particular, there’s no decomposition done of user stories at this point. Once you’ve got your enough stories entered and stack ranked you’ll start assigning them to iterations. You’ll define start and end dates for your iterations as well as entering known interruptions. As you assign your stories you be able you figure out if you have enough iterations defined for your project.
  • Once you’ve done got your backlog populated, you move to the Iteration Planning workbook for your first iteration. Only the stories you assigned to this iteration will appear here. It is in this workbook that you’ll start breaking down user stories into tasks. You’ll also assign team members. You’ll assign these tasks to a team member and assign the Remaining Work in hours. You’ll use the Capacity sheet to see if team members are over or under allocated for the iteration. This allows you to easy load balance team members based upon their overall capacity.
  • Let’s look at the Agile Workbooks.&lt;Switch to demos script&gt;
  • Now, let’s see how you can use Visual Studio and Team Foundation Server to run your projects with greater visibility.
  • In order to do run your projects effectively, you need to know what your team members are doing, what they’re working on. Yet you don’t want to micromanage them and constantly ask “are you done yet?” You need to have the data provided to you. Data that’s being continuously gathered as your project progresses. You want your tools to be there when needed but out of the way when not. You want them to make it easy for team members to be visible but not overwhelmed with paperwork—real or digital. Visual Studio 2010 and Team Foundation Server 2010 provide you with the right tools, right now.
  • Whether you’re a project manager, a developer, a tester, user experience specialist … or whatever your title is … everyone works with the same data. Team Foundation Server’s Work Item Tracking is your centralized location for everything you need to track—user stories, tasks, and bugs. You keep all of this data in one place. As do your work, you update a work item’s status with data. For example, as a developer, the integrated check-in experience, first delivered in the 2005 release and refined in 2010, exemplifies this concept. As part of every check-in, a developer can associate their work with one or more work items. This creates a bi-directional link between the changeset and the work item. Thus if I’m viewing the history of an item in the Source Control Explorer, I can see what work the change was associated with. And I can go the other direction, I can view a work item and see all of the check-ins. This gives me both traceability and transparency into what my developers are doing. This is turns provides automatic progress reporting.
  • And it gets better in thisrelease. Work Item Tracking in the 2010 release now supports true hierarchical work items. This lets you define rich relationships like parent/child and predecessor/successor. This makes it easier to work with sets of data and provides for better traceability. For example, by defining all of your tasks as children of a user story, you start to see the real cost and effort of story. This can help with time allocations for test. By having predecessor and successor relationships, you can see if a preceding work item that’s held up by a blocking issue will delay other work items.
  • All of these work item features I’ve described are available just about everywhere. Whether you want access work items from your web browser, or via Team Explorer Everywhere with it’s rich integration into Eclipse, or via new easy access via SharePoint web parts, or from the reliable, rich integration in Visual Studio 2010, you team members can always get to their work items. It doesn’t matter if they’re on Windows, Mac OS/X and even Linux. In addition, Microsoft Office integration in Excel and Project provides customization and offline capabilities.
  • Let’s look at using work items.&lt;&lt;Switch to demo script&gt;&gt;.
  • Now, let’s look at the features available to you to review your projects with transparency.
  • At the end of an iteration, you can often find yourself asking what just happened? It’s that feeling of having been run over by something large and heavy. Generally reporting is time consuming and difficult at best. Missing pieces of valuable information is often common. The data required to get accurate answers is oftenhard to collect and can be difficult to interpret. You shouldn’t have to be a project management expert to know how your team did. You shouldn’t have to be a data-analyst to provide good progress reports.
  • Team Foundation Server provides you with many different and powerful ways to get the answers to your questions. In the 2010 release, we’ve enhanced every SQL Server Reporting Services report. You’ll find and richer experience with better data presentation and detailed documentation to help you use the reports right out of the box. In 2010, we’ve also added new Excel Reports. TFS feeds the reports via Work Item queries for fast and flexible reporting. Finally, rich SharePoint dashboards enable quikc visualization of project status. In addition, when used with SharePoint Server products, you can publish reports in a familiar and capable environment.
  • Let’s look at the new Stories Overview report. &lt;Build&gt;First, you see the report contains a description describing what this report is showing. &lt;Build&gt;Second, you get a list of related reports that might help expanding on the data shown here. &lt;Build&gt;Finally, you see the work progress on the user stories in context with data about test results and bugs.
  • Next as you scroll down, you see additional information in the footer. &lt;Build&gt;First, on the left you have questions this report answers with a hyperlink that takes you to the documentation about this report, which has additional details including healthy and unhealthy report examples. &lt;Build&gt;Second, you get the parameter values used to generate the report, something that helps when looking over printed copies in meetings for example. &lt;Build&gt;And finally, you get information on how up-to-date is this report. Every report in the 2010 release is like this.
  • Microsoft Excel is a great tool that provides a familiar user experience with support for rich data analysis and professional data presentation. Microsoft Excel serves multiple purposes. As I’ve shown you, it’s the host to the Agile Workbooks. You can also use it as data entry client for managing work items and for offline work item editing. In addition, in the 2010 release, we’ve integrated Excel and TFS more deeply to make it easy to create custom reportsof your data more quickly. Excel Reports generate rich reports from you work item data and present them in nicely formatted workbooks providing you with up to the minute information. In addition, if you’re using a SharePoint Server product, you can publish Excel Reports via Excel Services to your SharePoint dashboards.
  • Speaking of SharePoint, in the 2010 release we support automatic installation of Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 in the box. However, you could also choose to use Microsoft Office SharePoint Sever 2007, aka MOSS, or one of the forthcoming coming 2010 versions of SharePoint. SharePoint Foundation 2010 is the replacement for Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 and SharePoint Server 2010 is the replacement for MOSS. Out of the box get great new dashboards on any version of SharePoint. If you use one of the server products, you can take advantage of Excel Services and get an addition set of rich, built-in dashboards that make it easy for everyone to see how the project is doing.
  • Here are two examples &lt;Build&gt; of the dashboard you get when running on top of one of the full versions of SharePoint Server. First, we have the Burndown dashboard showing project progress. &lt;Build&gt; Second, we have the Quality dashboard. So what does the quality dashboard tell us? &lt;next&gt;
  • As you can see the Quality dashboard has four main graphs. &lt;Build&gt;First you can see if your test team is making progress on running test plans. &lt;Build&gt;Second, you can see how build are doing over time. What’s the trend like? Are you having lots of success or failure? &lt;Build&gt;Third, what’s your bug trend like. Are you closing out bugs or are you stagnate. Or is the velocity of your bug filing far exceeding your team’s ability to fix, test, and close out bugs? &lt;Build&gt;Finally, are you seeing a bad trend related to bug reactivations—bugs that were closed reopened by test as not fixed? All of this information is there for you in a quick, heads up dashboard format.
  • Let’s look at some of these great reporting features.
  • Well, I’m very excited about the 2010 release of Visual Studio and Team Foundation Server. We’ve worked hard to bring you a set of tools to help you focus more on building great software and less on being a project manager. We’ve provided the tools to reduce the project management friction that exists in most teams and eliminate the pain of having to drive a project. &lt;Build&gt; Plan your projects with confidence. &lt;Build&gt; You’ll have the tools to run your projects with greater visibility and with the great reporting features, &lt;Build&gt; you’ll be able to course correct your projects as you diagnose the root cause of problems that can jeopardize your project’s success. So get out there and install Visual Studio 2010 and Team Foundation Server 2010. Give yourself and your team the tools to build great software today! Thank you!
  • Проактивное управление проектами в среде Microsoft Visual Studio 2010

    1. 1. Проактивное управление проектами в средеMicrosoft® Visual Studio®2010<br />Дмитрий Андреев<br />Twitter: @dmandreev<br />
    2. 2. Development Leads and LeadersPeople who manage teams and individual contributor influentials<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />6<br />7<br />WHAT ARE THEY LIKE?<br />Software developers are problem solvers, tinkerers, artists and engineers all rolled up in one. No matter what they are building there is some element of it—or all of it—that is new. They love their job when stuff they are getting something and their work is not fragmented. Development takes clear thinking time, so they don’t want constant interruptions. Development leads understand this and don’t want to bug their team constantly for updates. <br />WHY ARE THEY HERE?<br />There has been a lot of buzz about agile development and they want to learn more. It would be great if it lived up to the promises to help them deliver projects more successfully, without focusing on being a project manager or inflicting a lot of work on the team. Many are in the process of adopting agile practices—Scrum in particular. They are looking for tools to help. Some in the audience may have already tried adopting agile practices, but they could be experiencing issues. They need tools, or have possibly started using tools, and they’d like to know why one toolset is better than another is.<br />WHAT KEEPS THEM UP AT NIGHT?<br />Are they going to deliver a quality project on time? What do they need to know now to course correct and get there? What can they do to reduce the risk and be more sure of this? There are so many factors out of their control. Something unexpected always comes up every project cycle and they have to firefight to get through it. Many projects outright fail and don’t deliver. This is one of their greatest concerns.<br />HOW CAN YOU SOLVE THEIR PROBLEM?<br />Automation of simple tasks makes them happen (e.g., developer updates a work-item, which updates a report). Planning tools help estimation and work allocation. Reporting tools boost certainly on delivery. Work item integration with Microsoft Project, and custom reports, ‘open the kimono’ to others. This results in less random requests of the team.<br />WHAT DO YOU WANT THEM TO DO?<br />Try it out for themselves: play with the tools, pilot a small project on your team, drive a rollout in your team.<br />HOW MIGHT THEY RESIST?<br />Team Foundation Server is too heavyweight: way too much to learn, too much stuff. It’s not “Scrum” enough. Many tools are more scenario focused (with less flexibility), and have features like planning boards and task-boards. Where are those?<br />I’ve tried Scrum before in my org and it was a disaster. I don’t want to do anything like that ever again.<br />WHAT’S THE BEST WAY TO REACH THEM?<br />Honesty. This doesn’t create world peace. Be clear about what it does and what it doesn’t do. They love to know how other people were successful: our adopters, internal dog food efforts, how we rolled it out, how it can work for teams of all sizes. They will read books, and case studies more so then developers. They want to enhance themselves and not just write code.<br />Target Audience<br />
    3. 3. S2S: Situation to Solution<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />SITUATION<br />Successful software projects manifest themselves when teams work together. When a team has good communication and transparency, it tends to find problems sooner. Teams want to come to work and are excited about what they’re building when things are going right. Those in the audience have heard that many successful projects are using agile techniques. They want to know if Visual Studio and Team Foundation Server mixed with agile can help bring success to their team. The bottom line is they want success but they don’t want to spend tons of time managing projects. They really want to focus on getting work done. <br />PROBLEM<br />Simply put, project management has often been about magic formulas and predictions without regard for team dynamics. Detached individuals providing unrealistic schedules based upon inaccurate data. Add to that micromanagement and a disregard for the humans—they’re people not resources. Finally, there’s a general lack of good, integrated tools. This has made it difficult for the development leads and leaders to (a) plan accurately in order to deliver on time, (b) have visibility into the project as it is running to discover indicators of potential issues, and (c) easily report on project status and health during and after the project.<br />IMPLICATION<br />They can hear the sounds of the Agile Manifesto ringing in the ears. In the industry, we’ve found many ways get more work done. The Manifesto calls them out well: individuals over processes; working software over documentation; customer collaboration over contract negotiation; responding to change over following a plan. Whether they’re doing agile or not, they ultimately want to focus on the people, both their team and customers. They want to ship working software on time. They want to start doing that today. But how?<br />SOLUTION<br />Visual Studio 2010 and Team Foundation Server enable you to easily plan projects. This integrated set of tools lets you leverage historical data so you can continuously improve your planning effort. They help you gain visibility into projects in flight. This provides easy discovery of indicators of potential issues. And, it lets you report on project status and health with an integrated application lifecycle management solution. This ensures you won’t be disrupted, or disrupt others, in order to provide information about the project to key stakeholders.<br />Target Audience<br />
    4. 4. Счастливые команды создают великий софт<br />Качественные коммуникации<br />Прозрачность<br />Удовлетворенность<br />
    5. 5. Проектное управление<br />В общем это болезненно<br />Не реальные сроки<br />«Ресурсы» а не люди<br />
    6. 6. ?<br />Не должно ли это быть …<br />люди а не процессы?<br />работающий софта не документация к продукту?<br />кооперацияа не согласование?<br />ответ измененияма не планирование?<br />
    7. 7. Фундаментальные принципы<br />Фокус на людях<br />Надежный софт<br />Счастливые клиенты<br />
    8. 8. Visual Studio 2010 позволит вам…<br />Планироватьпроектыс уверенностью<br />Вести проекты с большей прозрачностью<br />Диагностировать источник проблеми исправлять курс ваших проектовпрозрачно<br />
    9. 9. Планируйте более Аккуратно<br />
    10. 10. Планировать тяжело<br />Оценка даже в лучшем случае это угадывание.<br />Очень трудно понять сколько еще предстоит работы<br />Неудачи в прогнозировании задержек<br />
    11. 11. Рабочая тетрадь планирования<br />Поддержка Agile «из коробки».<br />Создана на основе лучших практик.<br />Два раздела:<br />Список задач всего проекта<br />Список задач итерации<br />
    12. 12. Список задач проекта<br />Файл Excel.<br />Интегрированный с Team Foundation Server.<br />Позволяет вам легко вводить пользовательские сценарии<br />
    13. 13. Планирование итерации<br />Сравнение текущего плана с предыдущими результатами.<br />Позволяет легко балансировать на уровне команды.<br />Включенные возможности по планированию прерываний.<br />
    14. 14. Демонстрация: Agile Workbooks<br />
    15. 15. Выполняйте проекты Прозрачно<br />
    16. 16. Предвидение – это искусство видеть то что не видно другим.<br />Джонатан Свифт.<br />
    17. 17. Правильные средства<br />Отслеживайте прогресс зная чем занимается ваша команда.<br />Собирайте данные постоянно.<br />Средства не должны быть обузой в ваших процессах.<br />
    18. 18. Отслеживание задач<br />Рабочие элементы интегрированы в весь процесс.<br />Задачи и их статусы меняются с каждым действием<br />Изменения в коде, сборка проекта, и.т.д.<br />Автоматические отчеты по прогрессу.<br />
    19. 19. Всё взаимосвязано<br />Раборчие элементы предоставляют возможность отследить все связи.<br />Отношения выявляют ранние индикаторы проблем.<br />
    20. 20. Управляйте работой где угодно<br />
    21. 21. Демонстрация: Рабочие элементы повсеместно<br />
    22. 22. Проверяйте проекты прозрачно<br />
    23. 23. Что только что случилось?<br />Составление отчетов сложная и длительная задача.<br />Необходимые данные трудно собрать и еще труднее понять.<br />Вы не должны быть аналитиком данных чтобы отчитаться по прогрессу.<br />
    24. 24. Работающие средства<br />SQL Server 2008 Reporting Services из коробки<br />Функциональность!<br />Отчеты Excel на основе рабочих элементов<br />Быстрота!<br />Индикаторы производительности SharePoint<br />-Прозрачность!<br />
    25. 25. Отчеты на базе SQL Server Reporting Services<br />Другие отчеты в этой категории<br />Прогресс показан в соотношении с сценариями и ошибками<br />О чем этот отчет?<br />
    26. 26. Отчеты Rich SQL Server Reporting Services<br />Вопросы на которые отвечает этот отчет<br />Дополнительные параметры для уточнения деталей<br />Насколько актуален этот отчет?<br />
    27. 27. Отчеты на базе Excel<br />Простые в использовании средства.<br />Низкие затраты<br />Знакомый инструмент<br />Легко менять<br />
    28. 28. Информационные панелиSharePoint<br />Выбирайте…<br />SharePoint Foundation<br />SharePoint Server<br />Готовые панели из коробки.<br />Настраиваемые и позволяющие создавать новые.<br />
    29. 29. Информационные панели SharePoint<br />
    30. 30. Готовы ли мы выпустить продукт?<br />Какой у нас прогресс по тестовым планам?<br />Как изменяется наш проект?<br />Исправляем ли мы ошибки?<br />Насколько хорошо мы исправляем ошибки?<br />Как дела?<br />
    31. 31. Демонстрация: Отчетность<br />
    32. 32. Visual Studio 2010 позволит вам…<br />Планироватьпроектыс уверенностью<br />Вести проекты с большей прозрачностью<br />Диагностировать источник проблеми исправлять курс ваших проектовпрозрачно<br />
    33. 33. Вопросы?<br />
    34. 34. Заполните анкету!<br />Анкеты Вы можете получить на выходе из зала.<br />В анкете пишутся доклады одного трека.<br />Вы можете взять анкеты за каждый трек и поставить оценки за те доклады, на которых Вы присутсвовали.<br />Нам важна Ваша оценка!<br />
    35. 35. © 2009 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Visual Studio, the Visual Studio logo, and [list other trademarks referenced] are trademarks of the Microsoft group of companies. <br /> <br />The information herein is for informational purposes only and represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation as of the date of this presentation.  Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided after the date of this presentation.  MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PRESENTATION.<br />

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