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The
Library of Congress
Classification
Daryl L. Superio
SEAFDEC/AQD Library
History
 was developed for Library of
Congress library collections in 1897
 James Hanson
 Charles Martel
 based on Exp...
History
 Early developments
 E-F: History of America (Western
Hemisphere)- first schedule to be
developed, 1901
 Z: Bib...
Versions
 Library of Congress Classification,
Print
 Classification Plus
 Super LCC
Basic Principles and Structure
 enumerative
 has twenty one (21) main classes
 consist of forty-one (41) printed
schedu...
Basic Principles and Structure
 Hierarchy
 uses main classes and sub-classes
 arranged from general to specific
 page ...
Basic Principles and Structure
 Revisions
 Schedules are
 revised individually
 revised not at the same time
 additio...
Basic Principles and Structure
 Advantages
 cutter numbers are flexible
 available in LC MARC
 funded by Library of Co...
Basic Principles and Structure
 Disadvantages
 large number of schedule
 no overall index
 American emphasis in geogra...
Structure of Library of Congress
Classification
 Main Classes
 expressed
alphabetically
 letters I, O, W,
X, Y- not bee...
Structure of Library of Congress
Classification
 Subclasses
 every classes
have subclasses
Structure of Library of Congress
Classification
 Schedules
 there are 41
individual
schedules for
the main
classes and
s...
Structure of Library of Congress
Classification
 physical format of
the schedule
 Preface
 gives the history
 explains...
Structure of Library of Congress
Classification
 physical format of
the schedule
 content page, lists
the:
 outline
 s...
Structure of Library of Congress
Classification
 physical format of the
schedule
 outline
 summarizes the
topics and
su...
Structure of Library of Congress
Classification
 physical format of the schedule
 the body of the schedule
 been develo...
Structure of Library of Congress
Classification
 physical format of
the schedule
 indentation
 shows hierarchy
 top of...
Structure of Library of Congress
Classification
 physical format of the schedule
 notes
 accompany LC class numbers and...
Structure of Library of Congress
Classification
 Types of Notes:
 scope notes
 explain the type of works to be classifi...
Structure of Library of Congress
Classification
 Types of Notes:
 including notes
 list topics which are included withi...
Structure of Library of Congress
Classification
 Types of Notes:
 see notes
 refer the classifier to a number, elsewher...
Structure of Library of Congress
Classification
 Types of Notes:
 confer notes (Cf)
 indicate that related topics are c...
Structure of Library of Congress
Classification
 Types of Notes:
 apply table at notes
 refer the classifier to a table...
Structure of Library of Congress
Classification
 Types of Notes:
 other notes
 used in the schedules, most of it is sel...
Structure of Library of Congress
Classification
 tables
 all schedules have tables
 within the body
 at the back of th...
Type of Tables
Table within the Body
Table at the Back of the
Schedule
Index
 a detailed in every
schedule
 refers classifier to
a specific LC
number
 the first place to
go when
classifying
...
Notation
 Call numbers (Symbols)
 are alphanumeric
 mixed notation
 two main parts
 Class number, may consist of:
 t...
Call numbers (Symbols)
 Example:
 An introductory text on geometry by Andrew
Brady, published in 1998
QA
445
.B73
1998
Q...
Cutter Numbers
 used for alphabetical arrangement
of materials in the shelf
 derived from the name of Charles
Ammi Cutte...
Cutter Numbers
 used to give a unique call number
 to indicate the specific title
 to indicate the geographical area
 ...
Cutter Numbers
 begins with the first letter of a
word
 followed by a decimal number
 always preceded by a decimal
poin...
LC Cutter Table
Cuttering and the LC Filing Rules
Date of Publication in Call Numbers
Date of Publication in Call Numbers
 in congresses or conferences
 the use of work letters
 work with different edition...
Hospitality
 the degree in which the system is
able to accommodate new subjects
Mnemonics
 not an inherent characteristic of LC
Tables
o are used in LCC for two main reasons:
 to save space
 to assign a more specific call number
o are included in a...
Types of tables:
 type 1 table- table within the schedules
 type 2 table- table within the schedules
 type 3 table- tab...
References
 Dittman, H. & Hardy, J. (2000). Learn Library of
Congress classification. Campbell, ACT:
DocMatrix.
 Find pr...
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The Library of Congress Classification

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The Library of Congress Classification

  1. 1. The Library of Congress Classification Daryl L. Superio SEAFDEC/AQD Library
  2. 2. History  was developed for Library of Congress library collections in 1897  James Hanson  Charles Martel  based on Expansive Classification  was based on LC collections  each schedule was developed by its group of subject specialists
  3. 3. History  Early developments  E-F: History of America (Western Hemisphere)- first schedule to be developed, 1901  Z: Bibliography, Library Science, 1902
  4. 4. Versions  Library of Congress Classification, Print  Classification Plus  Super LCC
  5. 5. Basic Principles and Structure  enumerative  has twenty one (21) main classes  consist of forty-one (41) printed schedules  Notation, is alphanumeric  starts with one, two or three letters  followed by a number up to four digits  sometimes followed by a decimal number  followed by an alphanumeric (the cutter number)  ends with a date of publication
  6. 6. Basic Principles and Structure  Hierarchy  uses main classes and sub-classes  arranged from general to specific  page layout convey hierarchy and meaning  Number building  an enumerative system  uses number building to expand the scheme
  7. 7. Basic Principles and Structure  Revisions  Schedules are  revised individually  revised not at the same time  additions and changes are continuous  Advantages  new classes, subclasses and topics can be added  unique number can be assigned to a work
  8. 8. Basic Principles and Structure  Advantages  cutter numbers are flexible  available in LC MARC  funded by Library of Congress
  9. 9. Basic Principles and Structure  Disadvantages  large number of schedule  no overall index  American emphasis in geographical arrangement  time lag between the revision of schedules  changes need to be checked in supplementary publications  new editions often require reclassification decisions  little documentation on how to use the classification  classification depends on acquisitions of the LC Congress
  10. 10. Structure of Library of Congress Classification  Main Classes  expressed alphabetically  letters I, O, W, X, Y- not been assigned
  11. 11. Structure of Library of Congress Classification  Subclasses  every classes have subclasses
  12. 12. Structure of Library of Congress Classification  Schedules  there are 41 individual schedules for the main classes and subclasses
  13. 13. Structure of Library of Congress Classification  physical format of the schedule  Preface  gives the history  explains changes
  14. 14. Structure of Library of Congress Classification  physical format of the schedule  content page, lists the:  outline  subclasses  tables  index
  15. 15. Structure of Library of Congress Classification  physical format of the schedule  outline  summarizes the topics and subtopics  gives an overall picture of the arrangement
  16. 16. Structure of Library of Congress Classification  physical format of the schedule  the body of the schedule  been developed by separate group of subject specialist  arranged from general to specific  indentation shows hierarchical relationships
  17. 17. Structure of Library of Congress Classification  physical format of the schedule  indentation  shows hierarchy  top of the pages, serves to put the topics on the page in context  summarizes the hierarchy
  18. 18. Structure of Library of Congress Classification  physical format of the schedule  notes  accompany LC class numbers and headings  indicates the scope  refers the classifier to another number
  19. 19. Structure of Library of Congress Classification  Types of Notes:  scope notes  explain the type of works to be classified at the subject  may refer the classifier to related topics elsewhere  Example at, QH 540:
  20. 20. Structure of Library of Congress Classification  Types of Notes:  including notes  list topics which are included within the subject  Example at, Animal Culture SF 101:
  21. 21. Structure of Library of Congress Classification  Types of Notes:  see notes  refer the classifier to a number, elsewhere in the schedule  number in parenthesis indicates that the number is no longer in use, and a see reference is given  Example at, QH 540:
  22. 22. Structure of Library of Congress Classification  Types of Notes:  confer notes (Cf)  indicate that related topics are classed elsewhere in the schedule  Example at, QH 540:
  23. 23. Structure of Library of Congress Classification  Types of Notes:  apply table at notes  refer the classifier to a table with subdivision instructions  Example at, NK 3650.5 A-Z:
  24. 24. Structure of Library of Congress Classification  Types of Notes:  other notes  used in the schedules, most of it is self explanatory
  25. 25. Structure of Library of Congress Classification  tables  all schedules have tables  within the body  at the back of the schedule before the index
  26. 26. Type of Tables Table within the Body Table at the Back of the Schedule
  27. 27. Index  a detailed in every schedule  refers classifier to a specific LC number  the first place to go when classifying  no general index
  28. 28. Notation  Call numbers (Symbols)  are alphanumeric  mixed notation  two main parts  Class number, may consist of:  the class or subclass letters  a whole number  decimal extension  cutter numbers  The Book number  cutter number  year of publication
  29. 29. Call numbers (Symbols)  Example:  An introductory text on geometry by Andrew Brady, published in 1998 QA 445 .B73 1998 QA represents the subclass mathematics from the Q schedule 445 subdivides mathematics more specifically to Geometry .B73 is the cutter number based on the main entry of the bibliographic record (which could be a personal author, corporate author or the title of the work) *in this call number the main entry is the author. The cutter number is: - preceded by a decimal point - constructed using the Library of Congress Cutter Table 1998 is the date of publication
  30. 30. Cutter Numbers  used for alphabetical arrangement of materials in the shelf  derived from the name of Charles Ammi Cutter  special needs of its collections
  31. 31. Cutter Numbers  used to give a unique call number  to indicate the specific title  to indicate the geographical area  to indicate special topic covered by a work  used in shelving
  32. 32. Cutter Numbers  begins with the first letter of a word  followed by a decimal number  always preceded by a decimal point  formed using a table
  33. 33. LC Cutter Table
  34. 34. Cuttering and the LC Filing Rules
  35. 35. Date of Publication in Call Numbers
  36. 36. Date of Publication in Call Numbers  in congresses or conferences  the use of work letters  work with different edition but same imprint  for facsimile editions  work with same topic, published in the same year and same corporate author as main entry
  37. 37. Hospitality  the degree in which the system is able to accommodate new subjects
  38. 38. Mnemonics  not an inherent characteristic of LC
  39. 39. Tables o are used in LCC for two main reasons:  to save space  to assign a more specific call number o are included in almost all schedules o schedules H, N, P, B and L—contains more tables o schedules K and P have separate tables o tables which apply generally across all schedules o tables which apply only to specific subject or subclass
  40. 40. Types of tables:  type 1 table- table within the schedules  type 2 table- table within the schedules  type 3 table- table within the schedules  type 4 table- table within the schedules + table at the back of the schedule  Biography table  Translation table  Language and literature tables  Form Division Tables For Law
  41. 41. References  Dittman, H. & Hardy, J. (2000). Learn Library of Congress classification. Campbell, ACT: DocMatrix.  Find product services. (n. d.). Library of Congress, Cataloging Distribution Service. Retrieved on 18 Aug. 2012, from http://www.loc.gov/cds/products/index.php.  Library of Congress classification. (2010). Wikipedia: the free encyclopedia. Retrieved on 24 September 2010, from http:// en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Library_of_Congr ess_Clas

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