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Behind Their Eyes v1

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Behind Their Eyes - making thinking visible is not enough
Walk into any classroom and watch the breakneck pace at which teachers are working hard to help students learn. Mind you, if we don’t uncover what students are thinking while learning, they may be running down the wrong path. OK, so we need ways to make student thinking visible. Seeing their thinking is important, but we also need to create the time and space for teachers to absorb, reflect, and act on what their students thinking reveals. This workshop will share strategies both for making student thinking visible and for creating time and space for teachers to meaningfully act on what they learn about what’s going on behind their eyes.

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Behind Their Eyes v1

  1. 1. Behind Their Eyesmaking thinking visible is not enough Darren Kuropatwa Building Learning Communities Boston, MA, July 2018
  2. 2. Hello. My name is … Glad to be on your team today. :-)
  3. 3. a soft start would you like to play a game? Darren Kuropatwa Building Learning Communities Boston, July 2018 lichess.org
  4. 4. lichess.org
  5. 5. What is “pedagogy”? “the art, science, or profession of teaching - Miriam Webster Dictionary
  6. 6. We have some great learning experiences we like to use to teach, but how do we choose activities in a deliberate way to achieve specific pedagogical goals? Pedagogy isn’t activities. “
  7. 7. What is a “pedagogical goal”? “I don't [know] any one [who] has advocated a system of teaching by practical jokes, mostly cruel. That, however, describes the method of our great teacher, Experience.” “To explain something to someone is first of all to show [them they] cannot understand it by [themselves].” “The Socratic Method is the highest pedagogical technique. I call it cornering a person. Instead of just telling you what I want you to know, I ambush you with questions. You try to escape, but you can’t.” What an educator does in teaching is to make it possible for the students to become themselves.” “To reach a child's mind, first reach a child's heart.”
  8. 8. research proven pedagogical practices
  9. 9. high impact pedagogical practices
  10. 10. high yield pedagogical practices
  11. 11. high probability pedagogical strategies
  12. 12. … is the aspect of chess playing concerned with evaluation of chess positions and setting of goals and long- term plans for future play. “ Chess strategy
  13. 13. control the centre 1
  14. 14. don’t move the same piece twice 2
  15. 15. 3 castle as quickly as you can
  16. 16. connect your rooks +1
  17. 17. … is the aspect of teaching concerned with evaluation of learning positions and setting of goals and long-term plans for future learning. “ Pedagogical strategy
  18. 18. how do we learn anything …
  19. 19. share amongst three tweet if you like your idea goes here your response goes here How do people learn? 3 ideas Think & Share @dkuropatwa #BLC18
  20. 20. 1flickr photo by acearchie http://flickr.com/photos/acearchie/ 4369849179 shared under a Creative Commons (BY-NC) license Uncover Errors and Misconceptions
  21. 21. 1 2 1 3 which is bigger?
  22. 22. Teachers must engage students’ preconceptions Students come to the classroom with conceptions of numbers grounded in their whole-number learning that lead them astray in the world of rational numbers; e.g. multiplying always makes numbers bigger. x = (Principle 1) Students’ Errors and Misconceptions Based on Previous Learning
  23. 23. ? culture of curiosity
  24. 24. ?flickr photo by Philippe Put http://flickr.com/photos/34547181@N00/6810339408 shared under a Creative Commons (BY-NC) license culture of curiosity
  25. 25. ?flickr photo by twodolla http://flickr.com/photos/twodolla/ 4066762475 shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license culture of curiosity
  26. 26. learner centred instructional design encourage attention from NAP: How Students Learn to preconceptions and begin instruction with what students think and know
  27. 27. 2flickr photo by Lex Photographic http://flickr.com/photos/lex-photographic/ 10389291854 shared under a Creative Commons (BY-NC) license Knowledge is Networked, not Hierarchical
  28. 28. 3/4 3 4 3:4 75% 0.75 $0.75
  29. 29. Understanding requires factual knowledge and conceptual frameworks The Knowledge Network: New Concepts and New Applications(Principle 2)
  30. 30. focus on what from NAP: How Students Learn is to be taught, why it is taught, and what mastery looks like knowledge centred instructional design
  31. 31. 3flickr photo by Lee Carson http://flickr.com/photos/tcatcarson/6648877295 shared under a Creative Commons (BY-NC-ND) license “We do not learn from experience... we learn from reflecting on experience.” - John Dewey
  32. 32. Learning is facilitated through the use of metacognitive strategies ... Principle 3 A metacognitive approach enables student self-monitoring
  33. 33. confirmation bias
  34. 34. provide frequent from NAP: How Students Learn opportunities to make students’ thinking and learning visible as a guide for both the teacher & the student in learning and instruction assessment centred instructional design
  35. 35. most talking is growing Marcia L.Tate Eliot teaching by flickr user yewenyi http://www.flickr.com/photos/yewenyi/381552561/ The person doing the the most dendrites.
  36. 36. 4flickr photo by JuditK http://flickr.com/photos/juditk/5655247429 shared under a Creative Commons (BY-ND) license Not Hands Off, Very Hands With - Kath Murdoch (+1)
  37. 37. community
  38. 38. If we want to go far …
  39. 39. encourage a culture from NAP: How Students Learn of questioning, respect, and risk taking community centred instructional design
  40. 40. knowledge networks metacognition community preconceptions
  41. 41. explore inquiry provoke reflect
  42. 42. explore inquiry provoke reflect:: :: preconceptions networks reflection all while making thinking visible
  43. 43. why inquiry? that’s how we learn
  44. 44. your idea goes here your response goes here What’s the most important thing I just said? @dkuropatwa #BLC18 FLIP OVER
  45. 45. John Steinbeck flickr photo by theloushe https://flickr.com/photos/theloushe/5845575505 shared under a Creative Commons (BY-NC-ND) license She breathed curiosity into us so that each day we came with new questions, new ideas, cupped and shielded in our hands like captured fireflies.
  46. 46. … is the aspect of teaching concerned with evaluation of learning positions and setting of goals and long-term plans for future learning. “ Pedagogical strategy
  47. 47. … are the aspects of role playing concerned with the move-by-move setting up of threats and defences. “ Chess tactics
  48. 48. tactics - fork
  49. 49. tactics - skewer
  50. 50. pedagogy is not activities strategies & tactics pedagog i cta ti s
  51. 51. … are the aspects of teaching concerned with the move-by- move setting up of learning challenges and achievements. “ Pedagogical tacticsPedagogi cta ti s
  52. 52. high impact pedagogical tactics tactics
  53. 53. What’s going on in this picture? What do you see that makes you say that? What more can you find? The 3 Questions
  54. 54. Routines exist in all classrooms; they are the patterns by which we operate and go about the job of learning and working together in a classroom environment. A routine can be thought of as any procedure, process, or pattern of action that is used repeatedly to manage and facilitate the accomplishment of specific goals or tasks. Classrooms have routines that serve to manage student behaviour and interactions, to organizing the work of learning, and to establish rules for communication and discourse. Classrooms also have routines that structure the way students go about the process of learning. These learning routines can be simple structures, such as reading from a text and answering the questions at the end of the chapter, or they may be designed to promote students' thinking, such as asking students what they know, what they want to know, and what they have learned as part of a unit of study.
  55. 55. Think - Pair - Share
  56. 56. I see … I think … I wonder …
  57. 57. 3 Thoughts/Ideas 2 Questions 1 Analogy 3-2-1 BRIDGEA thinking routine for activating prior knowledge and making connections flickr photo by freestock.ca ♡ dare to share beauty http://flickr.com/photos/ 82955120@N05/15811363626 shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license
  58. 58. intentionality strategies & tactics intuition ei i in n yo o
  59. 59. precision in pedagogy strategies & tactics e e i i in n y o o
  60. 60. flickr photo by Lee Carson http://flickr.com/photos/tcatcarson/6648877295 shared under a Creative Commons (BY-NC-ND) license “We do not learn from experience... we learn from reflecting on experience.” - John Dewey
  61. 61. bit.ly/BLC18eyes I used to think …
  62. 62. thank you Natalie Merchant - Kind and Generous @dkuropatwa dkuropatwa@gmail.com j.mp/whilewalking

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