Forming A Government

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Forming A Government

  1. 1. FORMING A GOVERNMENT Chapter 7: pg. 184 - 213
  2. 2. Section 1: The Articles of Confederation <ul><li>Pg. 186 – 191 </li></ul><ul><li>Objectives </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Describe the ideas and documents that shaped American beliefs about government </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Evaluate how state constitutions contributed to the development of representative governments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>List the powers held by the central government under the Articles of Confederation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Explain what the Northwest Ordinance accomplished </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Ideas about government <ul><li>Old English traditions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Magna Carta and English Bill of Rights – limited government </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Enlightenment thinkers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>John Locke – social contract between government and people </li></ul></ul><ul><li>American traditions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>New England town meeting, Virginia House of Burgesses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Native American Iroquois League </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mayflower Compact and Fundamental Orders of Connecticut </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. The state constitutions <ul><li>State constitutions during the Revolution </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Republicanism – elected officials work for the people </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Limited government – never enough power in one person </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Individual rights </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Virginia protected right to trial by jury, freedom of the press, freedom of religion </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Many states expanded suffrage </li></ul><ul><ul><li>All white men, white property owners, some blacks </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Forming a union <ul><li>Founding Fathers – “lets not make central government TOO powerful” </li></ul><ul><li>Articles of Confederation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Congress – one state, one vote. No President or Supreme Court </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Powers – coin or borrow money, negotiate treaties, settle conflicts between states </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Weaknesses </li></ul><ul><ul><li>No national army, no ability to raise taxes, very limited authority </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ratified in 1781 </li></ul>
  6. 6. The Northwest Territory <ul><li>Kill two birds with one stone </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Land Ordinance of 1785 – sell western lands to settlers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Broke lands into plots, saving some for schools and veterans, selling rest </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Northwest Ordinance laid groundwork for statehood </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When population in territory got to 60,000, could draft a constitution and ask to join the Union </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Included bill of rights, support for education, and ban of slavery in NW territory </li></ul></ul>

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