Chap6. Assessing science learning <br />Elementary Science Methods<br />
Assessment vs. Evaluation<br />Often both are used interchangeably.<br />Assessment: a process of gathering information ab...
Who uses Assessment? (p. 139)<br />Teacher<br />Students <br />Parents<br />District<br />State<br />National<br />
Assessment & Inquiry Science <br />Key questions (NRC, 2001) <br />Where are students trying to go? <br />Where are studen...
Keeping Assessment Straight	<br />Validity<br /><ul><li>The extent to which what we intend to measure.
Match the objectives or goals.</li></ul>Reliability<br /><ul><li>The extent to which an experiment, test, or any measuring...
Consistent, predictable, and dependable.</li></li></ul><li>Validity & Reliability <br />Neither Reliable<br />Nor Valid<br...
Assessment in the Classroom<br />Three types of assessment<br /><ul><li>Diagnostic (pre-assessment)
Formative
Summative</li></ul>Two approaches to assessment<br /><ul><li>Traditional
Alternative</li></ul>Formal vs. Informal (questioning, experience charts, science record pages, science notebooks, checkli...
Diagnostic Assessment<br />before starting teaching.<br />to discover needed information about your students’ knowledge, i...
Formative Assessment	<br />collect data on student learning during a lesson.<br />include formal and informal processes.<b...
Summative Assessment<br />Cumulative.<br />generally takes place after a period of instruction. <br />requires making a ju...
Traditional Assessment Approach<br />Unit or chapter homework<br />Quizzes<br />Tests (true/false, matching, multiple choi...
Alternative Assessment Approach<br />Assessments that differ in form than traditional paper-and-pencil assessments.<br />A...
Alternative Assessment Approach <br />Portfolios	<br />Oral/Written Pictorial Interpretations<br />Anecdotal Records<br />...
1. Portfolio Assessment<br />A purposeful and representative collection of student work that conveys a story of progress, ...
2. Oral/Written Pictorial Interpretations<br />Ask students to respond to pictorial situations<br />Song et al. (2008)<br />
3. Anecdotal Records<br />Teacher generated notes related to student academic progress, behavior, emotional development, o...
4. Concept Mapping<br />Learners organize their knowledge into connected network, “knowledge structures”<br />Involves the...
5. Science Journals (Notebooks)<br />Student generated<br />Record of thoughts, reflections, and work<br />Can be used to ...
6. Performance Assessment<br />Assessments that allow students to demonstrate their understandings and skills (to a teache...
7. Laboratory Practical<br />Used to assess specific knowledge related to laboratory experiences.<br /> Often set up as st...
* Scoring guide: Rubrics <br />A  type of scoring guide consisting of a number of evaluative criteria that are precisely d...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Chapter 6 assessment

1,869 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,869
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
80
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
39
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Chapter 6 assessment

  1. 1. Chap6. Assessing science learning <br />Elementary Science Methods<br />
  2. 2. Assessment vs. Evaluation<br />Often both are used interchangeably.<br />Assessment: a process of gathering information about student learning for decision making.<br />Evaluation: typically a broader concept; focuses on the overall experience.<br />We’ll use “assessment” to discuss student learning.<br />
  3. 3. Who uses Assessment? (p. 139)<br />Teacher<br />Students <br />Parents<br />District<br />State<br />National<br />
  4. 4. Assessment & Inquiry Science <br />Key questions (NRC, 2001) <br />Where are students trying to go? <br />Where are students now?<br />How are students going to get there? <br />
  5. 5. Keeping Assessment Straight <br />Validity<br /><ul><li>The extent to which what we intend to measure.
  6. 6. Match the objectives or goals.</li></ul>Reliability<br /><ul><li>The extent to which an experiment, test, or any measuring procedure yields the same result on repeated trials.
  7. 7. Consistent, predictable, and dependable.</li></li></ul><li>Validity & Reliability <br />Neither Reliable<br />Nor Valid<br />Reliable <br />Not Valid<br />Both Reliable<br />And Valid<br />
  8. 8. Assessment in the Classroom<br />Three types of assessment<br /><ul><li>Diagnostic (pre-assessment)
  9. 9. Formative
  10. 10. Summative</li></ul>Two approaches to assessment<br /><ul><li>Traditional
  11. 11. Alternative</li></ul>Formal vs. Informal (questioning, experience charts, science record pages, science notebooks, checklists) <br />=> Depend largely on the type of objectives<br />
  12. 12. Diagnostic Assessment<br />before starting teaching.<br />to discover needed information about your students’ knowledge, interests, abilities, and preferences. <br />help teachers adjust instructional strategies to students’ individual differences and decide learning experiences that encourage students’ progress. <br />
  13. 13. Formative Assessment <br />collect data on student learning during a lesson.<br />include formal and informal processes.<br />link to scaffolding<br />to provide feedback to teachers and students over the course of instruction. <br />to modify instruction and the curriculum to the benefit of the learner. <br />
  14. 14. Summative Assessment<br />Cumulative.<br />generally takes place after a period of instruction. <br />requires making a judgment about the learning that has occurred (e.g., by grading or scoring a test or paper) .<br />
  15. 15. Traditional Assessment Approach<br />Unit or chapter homework<br />Quizzes<br />Tests (true/false, matching, multiple choice, completion, short-answer, essay, etc.)<br />Standardized tests <br />
  16. 16. Alternative Assessment Approach<br />Assessments that differ in form than traditional paper-and-pencil assessments.<br />Addresses different learning / testing styles.<br />i.e. build a frame to hold an egg so it does not crack or break when dropped 20 vertical feet.<br />
  17. 17. Alternative Assessment Approach <br />Portfolios <br />Oral/Written Pictorial Interpretations<br />Anecdotal Records<br />Concept Mapping<br />Science Journals<br />Performance Assessment<br />Laboratory Practical<br />
  18. 18. 1. Portfolio Assessment<br />A purposeful and representative collection of student work that conveys a story of progress, achievement and / or effort. <br />student is involved in selecting pieces of work. <br />criteria for selection and evaluation need to be made clear prior to selection. <br />
  19. 19. 2. Oral/Written Pictorial Interpretations<br />Ask students to respond to pictorial situations<br />Song et al. (2008)<br />
  20. 20. 3. Anecdotal Records<br />Teacher generated notes related to student academic progress, behavior, emotional development, or social development.<br />Useful in explaining and / or justifying student progress.<br />Includes specific dates, times, events, etc.<br />
  21. 21. 4. Concept Mapping<br />Learners organize their knowledge into connected network, “knowledge structures”<br />Involves the use of central themes, ideas, or concepts and juxtaposing them to reflect interrelationships.<br />
  22. 22.
  23. 23.
  24. 24. 5. Science Journals (Notebooks)<br />Student generated<br />Record of thoughts, reflections, and work<br />Can be used to demonstrate conceptual understanding<br />
  25. 25. 6. Performance Assessment<br />Assessments that allow students to demonstrate their understandings and skills (to a teacher or an outsider) as they perform a certain activity. <br />They are evaluated by a teacher or an outsider on the quality of their ability to perform specific tasks and the products they create in the process. <br />E.g., model building, demonstrations, projects, science fair projects <br />
  26. 26. 7. Laboratory Practical<br />Used to assess specific knowledge related to laboratory experiences.<br /> Often set up as stations where students answer questions or perform specific tasks.<br />Type of performance assessment.<br />
  27. 27. * Scoring guide: Rubrics <br />A type of scoring guide consisting of a number of evaluative criteria that are precisely describe according to level of quality, usually with points assigned to each level. <br />
  28. 28. Outcomes of Teacher’s Assessment Strategies<br />Inform and Evaluate Student Progress <br />Improving Classroom Practice <br />Planning Curricula <br />Developing Self-directed Learners <br />Researching Teaching Practice<br />
  29. 29. Reporting Student Progress<br />Progress reports provide information about:<br />The teacher's performance standards and criteria for evaluation. <br />A student's progress from marking period to marking period and from year to year. <br />A student's progress in mastering the science curriculum. <br />A student's achievement measured against standards-based criteria. <br />
  30. 30. Assessment at District, State or National Levels<br />Assessments may be conducted by authorities external to the classroom for the purposes of:<br />Formulating policy. <br />Monitoring the effects of policies. <br />Enforcing compliance with policies. <br />Demonstrating accountability. <br />Making comparisons. <br />Monitoring progress toward goals. <br />
  31. 31. Final Thoughts on Assessment<br />Be sure your assessment is authentic<br />Be fair in assessment practices<br />Communicate expectations with your students<br />Use multiple formats<br />Assess students’ knowledge, understanding, and abilities to inquire<br />

×