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Elevator speech

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Elevator speech

  1. 1. ELEVATOR SPEECHES Use your position statement in elevator speeches as your signature” message. “Stay on message!” An elevator speech is a short, highly focused 30-second way of sharing your message. The name reflects the fact that an elevator speech can be delivered in the time span of an elevator ride (for example, thirty seconds and 100- 150 words). Usually it is unplanned and often a on-on-one conversation. Adapted from Wikipedia  
  2. 2. Components of an Elevator Speech • Position Statement • Three supporting points 1. The “Hook” – targeted to the audience or listener 2. The Evidence – proof or research to make it believable 3. “Bring it home” – connection to local setting • Concluding question or “ask” Use supporting points to drill down into needed details to provide a platform for your message. Use an outline format with bullets, if printed.
  3. 3. The Three Supporting Points Supporting points further explain your position statement, in some cases, answering how and why. 1. The “HOOK” - Why the listener should care; elaborate on the benefit 2. The PROOF– One sentence with statistics/research to back up your claims or a supporting talking point 3. “BRING IT HOME” - Personalize the issue by talking about your school and students.
  4. 4. Ending the Elevator Speech Conclude with an invitation or request. •Ask a legislator to visit your library •Invite parents to attend an Open House program. •Ask to present to the Chamber of Commerce. •Offer to do a presentation to the School Board. •Ask to reconsider a budget or position cut. Follow up with an email or phone call a week later to restate your invitation/request.
  5. 5. ELEVATOR SPEECHES TIPS   • Keep it simple, concise, and clear- no more than 150 words; 3 supporting points • Use your own words – no library jargon • Be positive and enthusiastic • Although it is personal; try to keep it professional and as impersonal as possible • Keep it conversational and non-confrontational • Practice and memorize your position statement and the 3 points • Always be prepared! Stay on message-yours! Remember it’s about students & learning, not you!
  6. 6. ELEVATOR SPEECHES TIPS   • Keep it simple, concise, and clear- no more than 150 words; 3 supporting points • Use your own words – no library jargon • Be positive and enthusiastic • Although it is personal; try to keep it professional and as impersonal as possible • Keep it conversational and non-confrontational • Practice and memorize your position statement and the 3 points • Always be prepared! Stay on message-yours! Remember it’s about students & learning, not you!

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