Lean Fundamentals Rev A

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Lean Fundamentals Rev A

  1. 1. Lean Fundamentals WELCOME!1 Last revision May 8, 2001 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  2. 2. Agenda Introduction Lean Thinking Lean Line Design Conclusion2 Last revision May 8, 2001 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  3. 3. Agenda Introduction Lean Thinking Lean Line Design Conclusion3 Last revision May 8, 2001 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  4. 4. Influences That Trigger Change highly rapid growth in tighter configurable size & revenue quality products standards high cost of insufficient manufacturing vendor capabilities fluctuations in material demands shortages increased inconsistent long learning competition processes curves4 Last revision May 8, 2001 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  5. 5. Industry Phases Innovation Differentiation Cost Cost Drivers  Simpler Designs  Commonality  Manufacturable Models  Maintainability/Serviceability  Economies of Scale  Short Cycle Times  Supply Chain Management5 Last revision May 8, 2001 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  6. 6. Lean Manufacturing Progression1995  Benchmarking  Training at JcIT Institute  Pilot conversions on modules6 Last revision May 8, 2001 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  7. 7. Lean Manufacturing Progression 19961995 „Lean Teams‟ Formed  Division Conversions Began  Support Functions Re-design Began7 Last revision May 8, 2001 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  8. 8. Lean Manufacturing Progression 1996 1995 1997 ULMI8 Last revision May 8, 2001 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  9. 9. Unified Lean Manufacturing Initiative  Establishment of Common Processes for: - Manufacturing - Product development - Product management  Improved Performance in: - Profitability - Quality - Cycle Time - Asset Management - Delivery9 Last revision May 8, 2001 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  10. 10. Transitioning to a Lean Enterprise1 Last revision May 8, 20010 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  11. 11. Transitioning to a Lean Enterprise1 Last revision May 8, 20011 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  12. 12. Transitioning to a Lean Enterprise1 Last revision May 8, 20012 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  13. 13. Going Up for a Strategic View...1 Last revision May 8, 20013 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  14. 14. What It Means to be a Lean Enterprise? The WHOLE Business System Customers It Reaches Suppliers across Board of Directors Investors Products Processes It Consists Individuals of Teams Organizations Functions1 Last revision May 8, 20014 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  15. 15. A LEAN enterprise focuses on... Eliminating non value-added activities throughout the enterprise Building an integrated product delivery process to meet changing needs of customers Supporting a fundamental change in management philosophy A LEAN enterprise practices LEAN thinking!1 Last revision May 8, 20015 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  16. 16. Characteristics of a Lean Enterprise All processes, systems and initiatives -including supplier partnerships- are aligned, to efficiently provide the right products to the right customers at the right time…. Processes are in place to Management of the business capture the knowledge of is based on metrics, and they customers (internal and are aligned at all levels external!) and their values to evaluate performance The entire product delivery process is flexible so the enterprise can respond quickly to changes1 Last revision May 8, 20016 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  17. 17. Agenda Introduction Lean Thinking Lean Line Design Conclusion1 Last revision May 8, 20017 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  18. 18. Lean Thinking... ...a mentality that emphasizes doing those things, and only those things, that create or add value to what the customer is willing to pay for. If it doesn’t add value, it is WASTE!1 Last revision May 8, 20018 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  19. 19. Principles of Lean Thinking from Womack & Jones Lean Thinking  Specify the value of each product and service from the customer‟s perspective.  Identify every step in the value stream to highlight waste.  Make products flow without interruption by eliminating waste.  Produce only what is pulled by the customer.  Pursue perfection by continually improving.1 Last revision May 8, 20019 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  20. 20. Lean Principle #1 Specify the value of each product or service from the customers‟ perspective.2 Last revision May 8, 20010 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  21. 21. What is value? Value is the product or service which meets the customer‟s requirements at a price he is willing to pay when he requests it. Value is providing the right product for the right price at the right time.2 Last revision May 8, 20011 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  22. 22. Who‟s the Customer? Anyone, internal or external, who requires a product or service Final consumer Boss/management  Co-workers You will likely have multiple customers, and they change frequently!2 Last revision May 8, 20012 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  23. 23. Lean Principle #2 Identify every step in the value stream to highlight waste.2 Last revision May 8, 20013 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  24. 24. Mapping out the Process 1. Identify all steps in the value stream, including an estimated duration. 2. Identify value add activities vs. waste: Value Added Necessary, but non-value added Non-value added 3. Indicate types of waste2 Last revision May 8, 20014 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  25. 25. A Value Stream …consists of all activities and processes that are required to bring a specific product/service:  from concept to design and engineering  from raw materials to product launch  from order-taking to scheduling  from delivery to & support of the customer This means everybody, and everything that takes place to produce the product/service!2 Last revision May 8, 20015 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  26. 26. Disconnected Processes Most processes are full of  Lost orders, disconnects and bottlenecks  Delays, where the process crosses  Mistakes and departmental lines.  Other failures that cost time, money and customers!2 Last revision May 8, 20016 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  27. 27. Adding Value or Waste? Lean thinking distinguishes between those activities that are actually adding value to the product or service, and those activities that are not adding value. If it‟s not adding value, it is WASTE!2 Last revision May 8, 20017 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  28. 28. Waste Eliminating waste is the greatest potential source of improvement in corporate profit, performance, and customer service. For most production operations: - 60% add no value at all - 35% are “necessary” activities, but don‟t add value - only 5% of activities actually add value!2 Last revision May 8, 20018 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  29. 29. Lean Flow  Waste disrupts the continuous flow to complete a product or process – Processes or machines that take too long – Inadequate training or staffing – Lack of information and direction – Bad quality or late arrival of materials  Inventory and queues are usually symptoms of another problem2 Last revision May 8, 20019 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  30. 30. Mapping out the Process 1. Identify all steps in the value stream, including an estimated duration. 2. Identify value add activities vs. waste: Value Added Necessary, but non-value added Non-value added 3. Indicate types of waste3 Last revision May 8, 20010 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  31. 31. Value Stream Mapping Tool Value Stream is all the actions (both value added and non value added) currently required to bring a product through the main flows essential to every product3 Last revision May 8, 20011 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  32. 32. Why Value Stream Mapping is an Essential Tool  Helps you to visualize the big picture, not just individual processes to improve the whole, not just optimizing the parts.  Helps you to see the sources of waste in your value stream  It forms the basis of a Lean Implementation Plan.  It shows the linkage between the information flow and the material flow.3 Last revision May 8, 20012 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  33. 33. Initial Value Stream Mapping Steps Product Family Current-State Drawing Future-State Drawing Work Plan & Implementation3 Last revision May 8, 20013 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  34. 34. Value Stream Improvement & Process Improvement  Follow the product from beginning to end  Draw visual representation of every process in the materials and information flows3 Last revision May 8, 20014 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  35. 35. 3 Last revision May 8, 20015 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  36. 36. 3 Last revision May 8, 20016 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  37. 37. Information for a process data box “The Big Four”:  Number of product variations  Cycle time (from 1 piece to the next)  Changeover time  Process Reliability  Number of operators  Scrap Rate  Production batch size  Working Time (minus breaks)  Pack Size3 Last revision May 8, 20017 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  38. 38. A Fictional Value Stream Map - An example of Lean ToolsValue Stream Map Supplier XYZ " CURRENT STATE"Standard Product Family( 75% of Product) Production Control2/15/2000 FORECAST Issues Daily Priorities Purchase Orders Applied Placed as needed based upon: Materials * Gross inventory check for spot buys Suppliers * Bus-Route(contract) forecast- Trident- Reliant- Metal West- Others Daily OSPAs Ordered Plating OSP I Manufacturing Orders 2 -5 Da ys Shop Schedule 2 Primary & 2 Secondary Suppliers Dallas 2X Month Inspection 3X Week M,W ,F 1 I 2 D ays 95% First Pass Yield Inspection Sheer Turret Deburr Brakes Assy & Paint Ship / FGI I I I I I Hardware I I Packaging 1 3 11 7 6 6 7 30 Da ys P aint 5 Da ys 1 4+ D ay s 2 D a ys 14 D ays 1 Day Ra w S toc k .5 Da ys C /T = 1 Da y Day Shift Only Shifts: 2 + Weekend Shifts: 2 + W eekend Shifts: 2 + W eekend Hardware: 1 Shift Operation 2 shifts / 3 people Cle an Capacity at Turret 1 Person can operate C/T = 12 0 M in Setup: 10-120 Min Dedicated to Bus determines when to 2 machines Assembly: 3 -5 D ays 1 shifts / 3 people Route from 5:30am to Sheer 40-50% Productivity Hi-Flex Capability KAIZEN Noon C /T = 3 0 M in 98-99% Yield (buffers C /T = 6 0 M in Im plem e nt P h os pha te 40-50% Productivity KAIZEN used to make up for D ip C le an S ystem No Productivity Measure Deburr is a scrap) C/O = 45-60 Min C /T = 1 D a y Bottleneck Uptime is High - PMs Capacity: 1 job/hr scheduled on W /E (~10 planks/job) KAIZEN KAIZEN C /T = 12 0 M in In cre a se Ca pa city X 3 a t KAIZEN C /T = 1 05 M in S e tup R e duc tions paint booth, pow de r D e dica te d S taging pa in t, an d batch ove n Are a s Qty in WIP = Demand Per Day Production Lead 30 Days X 5 Days 1 14 Days 2 Days 14 Days 5 Days 2 Days Time 72 Days Processing Time 30 min 105 min 120 min 120 min 60 min 1 day 1 day 2days7hrs25min3 Total lead time revision May Last 8, 20018 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  39. 39. A Fictional Value Stream Map -An example of Lean Tools Value Stream Map Supplier XYZ " FUTURE STATE" Standard Product Family ( 75% of Product) Production Control 2/25/2000 FORECAST Issues Daily Priorities Purchase Orders Daily Orders - EDI Pull Applied Orders are launched at Materials calculated re-order points for Raw Good Kanbans Daily Pull Orders Suppliers - Trident - Reliant - Metal West - Others Daily Manufacturing Orders OSP OSP Plating Based on Finished Goods Replenishment Triggers & I Spot Buy Orders 2-5 D ays 2 Primary & 2 Shop Schedule Secondary Suppliers As Ordered k S t oc w Ra 3X / Week Dallas Inspection 3X Week M,W,F 1 S ho p ord ers ar e Lo ad Le ve led b as ed on P r oduc t F am ily S ch edu lin g Ru le s 95% First Pass Yield Inspection Sheer Turret Deburr Brakes Assy & Paint Ship / Hardware Packaging? ?? D ay s 1 Day Shift Only .5 Da ys 3 Shifts: 2 + Weekend .5 D ay s 11 Shifts: 2 + Weekend .5 D ay s 7 Shifts: 2 + W eekend .5 Da ys Hardware: 6 2 shifts / 3 people .5 D a ys 6 C /T = 1 D ay .5 D ay s 7 1 Shift Operation Capacity at Turret 1 Person can operate C /T = 1 20 M in Setup: 10-120 Min Dedicated to Bus 30 D a ys Assembly: determines when to 2 machines Route from 5:30am to Finished Goods ? Ra w S toc k 40-50% Productivity 1 shifts / 3 people Sheer Hi-Flex Capability C /T = 6 0 M in Noon Inventory C /T = 3 0 M in 98-99% Yield (buffers No Productivity 40-50% Productivity used to make up for Orders are launched at Measure scrap) Inventory Sizing of Dallas provided gas C /T = 1 Da y calculated re-order points for C/O = 45-60 Min Uptime is High - PMs panel enclosures & gas panel piece Finished Good Kanbans Capacity: 1 job/hr scheduled on W /E parts (gas panel parts & spares ) (~10 planks/job) C /T = 1 05 M in C/T = 12 0 M in Production Lead Time 30 Days .5 Days .5 Days .5 Days .5 Days .5 Days .5 Days 33 Days Processing Time 30 min 105 min 120 min 120 min 60 min 1 day 1 day 2days7hrs25min3 Total lead time revision May Last 8, 20019 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  40. 40. Using Five Whys Problem Data gathering Problem clarification Why? Why? Why? Why? Why? Root cause4 Last revision May 8, 20010 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  41. 41. Measurements  Why measure?  What to measure?  Hierarchy of measurements  Leading and lagging indicators  Importance of adding a reference, benchmark, or standard  Location for measurements  Data and information  Data collection and processing4 Last revision May 8, 20011 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  42. 42. Measurements- Why Measure?  You can manage if you can measure  Offers a baseline for continuous improvement  You will know if your efforts to improve are working  Customer requirements demand it  You can make decisions based on the information derived from the measurements  Lean conversion  Certification  Pricing  Etc.4 Last revision May 8, 20012 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  43. 43. MeasurementsTo ensure they will be effective and useful, determine:  Which measures does the customer want?  Which measures do you need to improve performance? Cycle time Quality Cost Productivity  What information/results do you want to obtain? Remember: if the measure is not being used for decision making, ask “WHY ARE WE MEASURING THIS?” Caution: Measurements entail cost and effort!4 Last revision May 8, 20013 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  44. 44. Measurements  Identify the critical operations to determine where to start for the most cost effective improvements  Create documented maps of the processes: Identify the inputs & outputs Set applicable standards for each critical step Show cause and effect relationships Disconnects will indicate missing or non value- adding measurements  Determine how the types and locations of the metrics are linked throughout the organization4 Last revision May 8, 20014 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  45. 45. Measurements It all starts with a Hoshin Annual Operating Plan (AOP)... A specific, measurable objective to achieve breakthrough results.4 Last revision May 8, 20015 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  46. 46. The Aim of Hoshin Planning is to ... Align people, activities, and performance metrics throughout all levels of the organization with strategic priorities so the Company can achieve its corporate mission….4 Last revision May 8, 20016 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  47. 47. Measurements Hoshins/AOP Goals Quality Cost Cycle Time Failure Prevention Inventory Takt Throughput Internal/ External Operating Appraisal Expenses4 Last revision May 8, 20017 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  48. 48. Measurements- Measure What? Hierarchy of Measurements Similar to Hoshin planning, define the hierarchy of measurements and show the cascading links between metrics at different levels of the company.Example: Level 1: Earnings / Profitability, Customer 3 Level Company satisfaction, On time delivery System Plant 1 Plant 2 Level 2: Plant based metrics: scrap rates, returns, schedule… Line 2 Line 2 Line 3 Line 1 Line 1 Level 3: Line based metrics: cycle time, yields, escapes...4 Last revision May 8, 20018 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  49. 49. Cascading Objective Process Corporation Hoshin Corporate Objectives Strategies Initiatives Level 1 Programs Business Unit Business Unit Business Objectives Unit Level 2 Strategies Division Division Division Objectives Strategies Level 34 Last revision May 8, 20019 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  50. 50. Measurements- Measure What?  Have consistent definitions for whatever is being measured  Know the difference between proactive and reactive: - Lagging - downstream indicators for use in preventing defects upstream (reactive) - Leading - upstream indicators for use in predicting quality downstream (proactive)  Example: high reject rates (leading) can be an indication of poor profitability (lagging)5 Last revision May 8, 20010 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  51. 51. Measurements- Measure What?  Measures have little meaning in isolation  Comparison with a reference will add relevance  In absence of a standard or benchmark, at least have a baseline to use for making comparisons TargetCycle Time Cycle Time Month Month 5 Last revision May 8, 2001 1 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  52. 52. Measurements- Measure Where?  Most measurements are carried out too late; typically at the end of the process (lagging indicators)  Such measurements are usually easy and convenient to install, but might be of little help in preventing problems  Measuring as close as possible to the point of cause or occurrence is more pro-active (leading indicators)  Implementing closed loop feedback and real time controls on the operations can actually prevent non-conformances from occurring in the first place Measurements are often started on every operation in the business, even if they aren’t the right ones!5 Last revision May 8, 20012 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  53. 53. Measurements- Data and Information  Data is not always the same as information  Information is that which can be used for decision making  Information for one stage can be data for the next Supplier End Applied Materials End ---Data set 1 Information Processing set 1 Processing Information ---Data set 2 Information set 3 ---Data set 3 set 2 Data set 4 Data set 55 Last revision May 8, 20013 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  54. 54. Measurements-Data Collection and Processing  The metric is only as good as the integrity of the data collected  Statistical treatment of data can add more power to analysis & decision making  Presentation of information should be simple yet comprehensive, and it should be directly aimed at facilitating the decisions that are to be made  Information should be made available in a timely manner to those who need it  Cross check to see if the information is useful in the way it is intended to be5 Last revision May 8, 20014 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  55. 55. Measurements - Summary  Start with what is important to the customer  Remember that measurements are often lagging indicators  Understand the process, the causes/effects, the inputs/outputs  Develop the hierarchy of measurements to address gaps and redundancies  Identify the critical points where measurements will make the biggest difference5 Last revision May 8, 20015 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  56. 56. Measurements - Summary  Use measurements as leading indicators for the most proactive approach, and understand how they are linked to lagging indicators.  Data integrity checks are important since it becomes the foundation for many decisions  Presentation of information (rather than data) should be simple, comprehensive, and timely5 Last revision May 8, 20016 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  57. 57. Mapping out the Process 1. Identify all steps in the value stream, including an estimated duration. 2. Identify value add activities vs. waste: Value Added Necessary, but non-value added Non-value added 3. Indicate types of waste5 Last revision May 8, 20017 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  58. 58. Let‟s GO Take A Break!5 Last revision May 8, 20018 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  59. 59. 7 Wastes Overproduction Waiting Time Transportation Processing Inventory Motion Defects5 Last revision May 8, 20019 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  60. 60. Overproduction Producing More Than Needed Producing Faster Than Needed6 Last revision May 8, 20010 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  61. 61. Wait Time Waiting for signatures Watching machines or equipment run Keeping busy to avoid being idle Waiting for computers to process data Waiting for materials Waiting for someone w/ the right skill Waiting in traffic6 Last revision May 8, 20011 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  62. 62. Transportation Sending materials/product long distances Handling materials/paperwork multiple times Storing incoming material before it is used Returning unused materials Having multiple storage locations Routing documents to multiple signers6 Last revision May 8, 20012 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  63. 63. Processing Processes that don’t do the entire job, or that do it incorrectly Poorly maintained equipment that produces poor quality Doing things manually instead of automatically Doing more than would be necessary6 Last revision May 8, 20013 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  64. 64. Inventory Cost of materials Cost and management of obsolete materials Space & equipment Interest charges Defects, rework Paperwork & documents in queue Inventory accounting6 Last revision May 8, 20014 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  65. 65. Inventory Analogy Boat = Production System Water Level = Inventory Level Over Production Wait Time Process Defects Rocks = Hidden Problems (Uncovered as Inventory is Reduced)6 Last revision May 8, 20015 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  66. 66. Motion Searching for tools or supplies Walking to multiple areas to accomplish a task Things located in random locations or not according to frequency of use Picking something up multiple times6 Last revision May 8, 20016 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  67. 67. Defects Rework Scrap Lost work Time Sorting Warranty Costs Lost Customer Satisfaction Other intangibles (Typos?)6 Last revision May 8, 20017 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  68. 68. Lean Principle #3 Make products flow without interruption by eliminating waste.6 Last revision May 8, 20018 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  69. 69. Tools & Techniques6 Last revision May 8, 20019 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  70. 70. 5Ss: The Gateway to Quality7 Last revision May 8, 20010 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  71. 71. Benefits Gives the opportunity to provide creative input to how your workplace should be organized and laid out, and to how your work should be done Makes your workplace more a pleasant to work Makes your job more satisfying Removes many obstacles and frustrations in your work Helps you know what you are expected to do, and when and where you are expected to do it Makes it easier to communicate with everyone you work7 Last revision May 8, 20011 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  72. 72. 5Ss: The Gateway to Quality Sort Set in order 5S Standardize Shine Sustain7 Last revision May 8, 20012 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  73. 73. Sort & Discard-Implementation No Value & Easy Dispose Immediately To Dispose Of Unnecessary Retain Some Actively Look Items Value For Best Customer No Value But Work Out Less Costly Costly To Dispose Of Method For Disposal Necessary Items Implement Next S7 Last revision May 8, 20013 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  74. 74. Sort & Discard BEFORE Sort & Discard AFTER Sort & Discard7 Last revision May 8, 20014 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  75. 75. Before Sort & Discard After7 Last revision May 8, 20015 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  76. 76. Set in Order To arrange necessary items in good order so that they are easily accessible for use There should be a home for everything and everything should be in its home 60 SECONDS RULE Everything should be able to be found & retrieved within 1 min.7 Last revision May 8, 20016 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  77. 77. Set in Order-Implementation Unnecessary Items Sort/Discard Place Near To The Frequently Used Point of Use Necessary Place A Bit Distant Sometimes Used Items To The Point Of Use Not Used But Must Place Separately Be Kept7 Last revision May 8, 20017 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  78. 78. Set in Order-Tools BENEFITS OF MOTION MAPPING Workstation 100 Workstation 200 Parts Integration Integration Workstation 100 Parts Workstation 200 Parts Integration Integration7 Last revision May 8, 20018 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  79. 79. Set in Order-Tools LABELING7 Last revision May 8, 20019 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  80. 80. Set in Order-Tools FLOOR TAPING8 Last revision May 8, 20010 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  81. 81. Set in Order-Tools Visual Management - You can see the work status of the line - there is no work present at these stations8 Last revision May 8, 20011 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  82. 82. Set in Order-Tools COLOR CODING8 Last revision May 8, 20012 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  83. 83. Standardize Taping and Post TAPE IDENTIFIER Used to tape Almost Everything: Carts, Tables, Tools, Shelves, Machines, Workstations, Incoming, Outgoing, and WIP Material Used to tape Waste: Trash Cans, Recycle Bins, Rework, DMR Used to Tape Walkways8 Last revision May 8, 20013 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  84. 84. Set in Order-Tools Part Replenishment carts are color coded by particular route.8 Last revision May 8, 20014 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  85. 85. Set in Order-Tools SILHOUETTES /CUTOUTS8 Last revision May 8, 20015 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  86. 86. Set in Order-Example Bin Labels Tool Cutouts Material Kanbans In Process Testing Kanban8 Last revision May 8, 20016 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  87. 87. Shine/Inspect-Implementation Unnecessary Items Sort/Discard Necessary Items Set in order Shine/Inspect Instant Maintenance Defect or Irregularity Found Requested Maintenance8 Last revision May 8, 20017 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  88. 88. Shine/Inspect-Tools 1. DEFINE AREA OF RESPONSIBILITY Draw map of cleaning area 2. DISTRIBUTE RESPONSIBILITY Schedule cleaning to be done and people to do it Devote certain times exclusively to cleaning 3. DEFINE STANDARD Develop a cleaning/inspection checklist Establish a minimum requirement8 Last revision May 8, 20018 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  89. 89. Shine/Inspect-Tools 5 S Checklist Workcenter Name Comp. By Date Score Out Of Checking Score Cat No. Item Evaluation Criteria CHECKLISTS 1 Parts or Materials No unnecessary stock items or work in progress All machines & equipment 2 Machines & Equipment are in regular use Jigs, All jigs, fixtures and Seiri 3 Fixtures & tools are in regular Tools use 4 Visual All unnecessary items can Controls be identified at a glance Standards There are clear standards 5 for for eliminating excess Disposal 1 Storage Visual controls used to fix location of all items Labels within the workcenter 2 Quantity Clear indications of max & Indicators min stock quantities Seiton 3 Dividing Blue tape used to divide Lines workcenter Jigs, Jig and tool storage 4 Fixtures & organized for ease of Tools removal and return8 Last revision May 8, 20019 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  90. 90. 5S Organizer and Implementation Schedule 5S Implementation Schedule Standardize/ Visual Area Lead Training Sort/Discard Arrange/Order Tape/Label Sustain Management Deburring Eli Button Completed Completed Completed Completed 4/30/01 5/8/01 Clean Room Frank Avalon 4/29/01 5/2/01 5/9/01 5/16/01 5/25/01 5/31/01 Weld Room Tony Bologna 4/30/01 5/4/01 5/11/01 5/18/01 5/25/01 5/31/01 Saw Area Adrian Castro 4/30/01 5/4/01 5/11/01 5/18/01 5/25/01 5/31/01 Building 1 Office Areas Gary Grant 5/1/01 5/11/01 5/11/01 5/18/01 5/25/01 5/31/01 Stock Room Lee Majors Completed Completed 5/1/01 5/9/01 5/18/01 5/25/01 Shipping/Receiving Eli Button Completed 4/30/01 5/3/01 5/11/01 5/25/01 5/31/01 Flash Manufacturing Mike Winn 4/29/01 5/4/01 5/11/01 5/18/01 5/25/01 5/31/01 Auto Clave Peter Gretzky 4/30/01 5/4/01 5/11/01 5/18/01 5/25/01 5/31/01 QA Don Juan Completed Completed 5/11/01 5/18/01 5/25/01 5/31/01 Hardware Eli Button Completed Completed 5/11/01 5/18/01 5/25/01 5/31/01 Horizontals Jorge Nakos Completed Completed 5/11/01 5/18/01 5/25/01 5/31/01 Shipping/Receiving Adrian Castro Completed 5/4/01 5/11/01 5/18/01 5/25/01 5/31/01 Machine Shop Verticals Andy Warhol Completed 5/4/01 5/11/01 5/18/01 5/25/01 5/31/01 Lathes Sela Ward Completed 5/4/01 5/11/01 5/18/01 5/25/01 5/31/01 Screw Machines Jorge Nakos Completed 5/4/01 5/11/01 5/18/01 5/25/01 5/31/01 EDM Adrian Castro Completed 5/4/01 5/11/01 5/18/01 5/25/01 5/31/01 Office Areas Jeff Wessley Completed 5/4/01 5/11/01 5/18/01 5/25/01 5/31/01 Kanban Area Terry Bologna Completed 5/4/01 5/11/01 5/18/01 5/25/01 5/31/01 NOTE - All steps must be completed and signed off on by 5S Supervisor before moving to the next stepSTEP ONE - TRAINING All employees in the area need to be trained in the seven waste and 5s Section off ALL items to be discarded until upper management can find the best home for them. Question the need for EVERY Item large and small; staplers, tape guns, pallet jacks, desks, extra shelving, etc. Also make a list of tools or equipment that you do needSTEP TWO - SORT/DISCARD and do not have in your area.STEP THREE - ARRANGE/ORDER The overall area should have a obvious and smooth flow. Tools, equipment, and material should be located in a reasonable way.STEP FOUR - TAPE/LABEL Everything in the area needs to have a home. This includes, monitors, tape guns, toolboxes, carts, etc.STEP FIVE - STANDARDIZE/SUSTAIN Radar charts, 5s seven waste posters, before + after photos, boundary samples, Suggestion boxes, need to be postedSTEP SIX - VISUAL MANAGEMENT Kanban system developed for line items, Visual tracking boards in place for production, Visual Work Instructions, 9 KEY Completed Last revision May 8, 2001 Late 0 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  91. 91. Shine/Inspect-Tools SHELVES SHELVES SHELVES SUBASSEMBLY SHELVES STATION 3 INTEGRATION SUBASSEMBLY STATION 2 STATION 3 MAPS SHELVES SHELVES SHELVES SHELVES SHELVES INTEGRATION STATION 1 SUBASSEMBLY STATION 39 Last revision May 8, 20011 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  92. 92. Shine/Inspect-Tools 5 S Schedule 5S Date To Date Category Task Responsibility Complete Completed Seiri Sort/ SCHEDULE Discard Seiton Arrange/  Decide order and Order frequency: daily, Seiso Clean/ Inspect weekly, monthly Seiketsu Stand./ Improve Shitsuke Believe/ Discipline9 Last revision May 8, 20012 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  93. 93. 5 S Schedule - another example REVISION 5 S Schedule DATE INITIALS REVISON DESCRIPTION AREA OWNER Task Description Owner Time (s) Daily 245 1 Visual Inspection 2 Empty metal Recycle Bin CO ING ATER L 3 Pull Incoming Materials M IA IN M Weekly 600 CNC 1 1 Sweep Area 3 Verify Tools & Equipment is Working 4 Check Safety Gaurds are in Place 5 Verify Eye Wash is Working 6 Check First Aid Cabinet CRANE 7 Internal 5 S Audit Tool Cart Monthly 300 ut oing aterials 1 Exernal 5 S Audit O G Total Time / month (seconds) 8200 M Total Time / month (minutes) 1379 Last revision May 8, 20013 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™
  94. 94. 5 S Checklist - Example Area __________ Date __________ Area __________ Date __________ Ratings: 5=Exceptional 4=Above Average 3=Average 2=Needs Improvement 1=Unacceptable Ratings: 5=Exceptional 4=Above Average 3=Average 2=Needs Improvement 1=Unacceptable Element SCORE 5S Seiri (Sort/Sift) 1 No parts, boxes, or any other unnecessary items, including trash, on the floor. 2 No unnecessary items on the line, on/under tables, in the area or overhead. 3 Aisles are totally clear. (No items can be left in the aisles) 4 Walls and overhead space are clear of all unnecessary signs, paper, pictures, etc. 5 No personal belongings in the area Seiton (Arrange/Organize) 1 Tools, parts, bins, racks, tables,sub-assys, finished goods, etc. are in their proper place. 2 Every item, including furniture, has an identified home. 3 Is every item in its identified home. 4 Parts, tools & equipment stored to ensure safety. 5 Min. / max., & FIFO rules are followed. 6 Kanban rules are followed. 7 Information boards are organized and current. 8 Cables, wires, etc. are neatly tied and securely attached. 9 All cabinets, drawers, racks, shelves, and storage locations are clearly labeled. Seiso (Clean) 1 Tables, tools, equipment, racks, parts, bins, floors, etc.,are clean. 2 Aisles and walls are clean. Seiketsu (Maintenance) 1 5S Instructions are posted. 2 5S Schedule is posted and all responsibilities are defined. 3 5S Radar Chart is posted, and is maintained. Shitsuke (Belief/Discipline) 1 No food, beverage, eating, or chewing tobacco on the line. 2 Trash cans are not full or over flowing. 3 People talking, playing loud music, or distracting others in the area. 4 Obvious that the people working in the area understand 5S. 5 Obvious that people working in the area believe in 5S. 6 Evidence of 5S competitiveness activities in the area. 7 People working in the area exhibit discipline & concentration on their work.9 Last revision May 8, 20014 TH E I N FO R M A T ION AG E S TA RT S H ERE ™

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