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Sculpture<br />A Three-dimensional work of Art.<br />
Two dimensional<br />Flat, Height and Width<br />Three dimensional<br />Volume or thickness, height, width and depth.<br />
Freestanding Sculpturealso called Sculpture in the Round<br />Sculpture in the Round (Freestanding Sculpture)—Stands by it...
Relief Sculpture<br />Relief Sculpture -A sculptural surface that that is not freestanding, but projects from a background...
Relief Sculpture<br />Low (Bas) Relief– A form of a sculpture in which portions of the design stand out slightly from a fl...
High Relief<br />High Relief– A relief where half of the forms normal thickness projects from the background.<br />
Sculpture Fundamentals<br />Form–The total mass or configuration that the subject or idea takes.  The final physical struc...
Sculpture Fundamentals<br />	Technique– <br />	The marriage of materials and tools with the ability of the sculptor.<br />
Sculpture Fundamentals<br />	Content– The emotion, passion or message that the sculptor intends to convey through the scul...
Repetition in Sculpture<br />Motif -<br />A unit that is repeated in visual rhythm.  Units in a motif may or may not be an...
Betsy Atwell Dudley<br />Many of my sculptures have dealt with the repetition of layers in wood, clay and metal. At first,...
Don Gummer<br />Don Gummer is an American sculptor born 1946 in Louisville, Kentucky.  His early work concentrated on tabl...
Betty Gold<br /><ul><li>Betty Gold was born in 1935 in Austin, Texas. She attended the University of Texas with a major in...
Alexander Calder<br />
Paper Sculpting Techniques<br />Tabbing<br />Slotting<br />Splicing<br />Curling<br />Zig Zag - Accordian<br />
Ppt Sculpture Repetiton Minus One Sculptor
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Ppt Sculpture Repetiton Minus One Sculptor

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Ppt Sculpture Repetiton Minus One Sculptor

  1. 1. Sculpture<br />A Three-dimensional work of Art.<br />
  2. 2. Two dimensional<br />Flat, Height and Width<br />Three dimensional<br />Volume or thickness, height, width and depth.<br />
  3. 3. Freestanding Sculpturealso called Sculpture in the Round<br />Sculpture in the Round (Freestanding Sculpture)—Stands by itself, usually made for viewing from all sides.<br />
  4. 4. Relief Sculpture<br />Relief Sculpture -A sculptural surface that that is not freestanding, but projects from a background of which it is a part.<br />
  5. 5. Relief Sculpture<br />Low (Bas) Relief– A form of a sculpture in which portions of the design stand out slightly from a flat background.<br />
  6. 6. High Relief<br />High Relief– A relief where half of the forms normal thickness projects from the background.<br />
  7. 7. Sculpture Fundamentals<br />Form–The total mass or configuration that the subject or idea takes. The final physical structure of the sculpture.<br />
  8. 8. Sculpture Fundamentals<br /> Technique– <br /> The marriage of materials and tools with the ability of the sculptor.<br />
  9. 9. Sculpture Fundamentals<br /> Content– The emotion, passion or message that the sculptor intends to convey through the sculpture.<br />
  10. 10. Repetition in Sculpture<br />Motif -<br />A unit that is repeated in visual rhythm. Units in a motif may or may not be an exact duplicate of the first unit.<br />
  11. 11. Betsy Atwell Dudley<br />Many of my sculptures have dealt with the repetition of layers in wood, clay and metal. At first, they represented civilizations and ancestral and social patterns. However, as I got closer to nature and to my own center, I sensed a deeper meaning. I began to acknowledge and appriciate the presence of the divine in everything. My art became stronger as I focus on the two fondations of reality-matter and spirit.<br />
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  13. 13. Don Gummer<br />Don Gummer is an American sculptor born 1946 in Louisville, Kentucky. His early work concentrated on table top and wall-mounted sculpture. In the mid 1980s he shifted his interest to large free-standing works, often in bronze. In the 1990s he added a variety of other materials, such as stainless steel, aluminum and stained glass. His interest in large outdoor works also led him to an interest in public art.<br />Education<br />School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts <br />Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut; BFA, MFA<br />www.dongummer.com<br />
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  19. 19. Betty Gold<br /><ul><li>Betty Gold was born in 1935 in Austin, Texas. She attended the University of Texas with a major in Elementary Education and a minor in Art History. After completing her studies, she entered the tutelage and apprenticeship of sculptor OctavioMedillan in Dallas, Texas.   "I've been asked many times to explain my art, but I don't think that there is an explanation, as such. I can say, however, that I began with the human figure and ended up with geometry, which I love. It's not an easily understood transition, or even one that I fully comprehend. Suffice to say that I don't think it will shed more light going beyond Picasso's simple but profound reflection that "It's the leap of the imagination." With the exception of some photographic work, everything I have done for the major part of my career has been based on a geometric concept. It never becomes tiresome and I continue to find new ways in which to express its truth and universality. Every new project is like the first: challenging, fulfilling, and exciting."  </li></li></ul><li>
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  22. 22. Alexander Calder<br />
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  32. 32. Paper Sculpting Techniques<br />Tabbing<br />Slotting<br />Splicing<br />Curling<br />Zig Zag - Accordian<br />

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