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Hive Community Meet-up 11/20/14: Hacking the Hive NYC Community Brokering Model

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Hive Community Meet-up 11/20/14: Hacking the Hive NYC Community Brokering Model

  1. 1. Hive Meet-up: Hacking the Hive NYC Community Brokering Model Dixie Ching Rafi Santo, Christopher Hoadley & Kylie Peppler MAGNET, November 20th, 2014 dolcelab
  2. 2. Game Plan! Introduction: Why brokering? Group work: Hacking the model “Network perspective” on brokering Brainstorm: Network-level initiatives Wrap up/Share out
  3. 3. Hive NYC Community White Paper “Supporting Interest-Learning Pathways in Hive NYC: A Focus On Brokering Learning Opportunities” I. Overview II. Hive NYC Mission for Youth Pathways III. A Focus on Brokering and “Connective Tissue” I. Model II. Challenges and Opportunities IV. Conclusion
  4. 4. What is Brokering?  “Bridging or linking youth to opportunities, individuals, and/or offline and online resources that can support their engagement in interest-driven learning toward various personal, academic, professional and civic goals.”
  5. 5. What does Brokering have to do with Pathways? “Youth Pathways” “Brokering”
  6. 6. Why is Brokering Important?  Set of values, practices (and tools) that are:  Relevant/necessary  Scalable  Adaptive
  7. 7. Hive NYC Community Brokering "Bridging or linking youth to opportunities, individuals, and/or offline and online resources that can suppor t their engagement in interest-driven learning toward various personal, academic, professional and civic goals.” Family Adults Non-Family Adults Peers Aunts, Uncles Programs Internships Field trips Principals Mentors Role models Friends Cousins Institutions Events Books, Magazines Peer collaborators Hive educators College attainability resources Career attainability resources Teachers Cousins Parents Siblings Acquaintances Grandparents Caretaker Family friend Guidance counselors Teaching ar tists Mentors “Opportunities” “ Information Sources” “Social Connections” Websites Hive educators “Leveling up” internships Teachers Visits to professional spaces Conferences Capstone events Hive youth “Brokering” W ho brokers? Guidance Counselors W hat is brokered? Post-program: - Offer a way to ‘level-up’ in the org (e.g., co-teach the program, become a “student resident,” etc. ). Possibly base this on passion in addition to (or instead of) skill level. - Discuss other programs w youth and help them apply. - Help them learn about ways to continue (online, via a program, etc.) Networking events, meetups Facilitating connections by arranging f2f meeting; helping with applications, resumes, and cover letters; etc. Feel OK with referring youth to OTHER programs, so to spread the love! Develop more and closer relationships with teachers, guidance counselors, and mentors W hat does brokering look like? Helping a youth develop an ar tifact (e.g., video, playable game) or por tfolio that she can use to garner her next oppor tunity. Noting things they’ve made (“ar tifacts” ) or done; documentation, description Looking at their por tfolios (learning, artist, writing, etc.) Knowing our youth in terms of their • interests, likes and dislikes • aptitudes • academic, civic, professional goals • home life, “ life stuff” • activity (what sorts of activities they’ve engaged in) Conversations (during class, program, via email, while hanging out, during pizza time, at maker party events, etc.) Noting badges activity Social media activity (Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram are less personal than FB) Listening to youth presentations (classes, programs, capstone events, maker par ties, etc.) Noticing what they show up for and what they do there (programs, capstone events, maker par ties, school events, etc.) W hat are some ways to get to know youth? Have easy access to an up-to-date list of oppor tunities and info sources. Have helpful social networks for brokering. Check in with current and past youth on a regular basis. Let them know you’re following their activities. Think about the timing of our recommendations (for ex, tell youth about a program 1-2 weeks before the deadline). How can we be bet ter brokers? Keep in mind the program features that matter to youth. Friends there; possibility of making friends Whether or not it: - conflicts with another program or sports team activities. - taps an interest or curiosity. - is free; provides a stipend. - might lead to an internship or job afterwards. - involves access to computers. - involves exposure to a type of technology that the youth is excited about (Arduino, Unity, Scratch, mobile phone software). Geographic location (transit time from school; back home) General vibe of the place, based on looks, ppl who work there, neighborhood W hat program features mat ter to youth? Awareness of societal issues Helping a youth connect her current experience to future career or college plans. Forums Longer or more frequent interaction times (year-long, semester-long programs; inviting back youth, etc.) Shadowships Fellowship, Scholarship Opps Professional training Professional Mentoring Noting their interactions at events where there’s a lot of “ free choice” (e.g., maker par ties, Emoti- Con, etc.). Other brokers Help youth develop personal, academic, civic and professional goals. Show how an interest can grow into those long-term possible futures. Create “ ladders of opportunities” within your org or with other oppor tunities beyond your org; if possible, your org should function as the ladder “rails.” Youth development principles could be useful here: e.g. Having high expectations for young people; what a "caring adult" looks like/how they relate to young people; helping young people understand impact of their action/inaction on the broader community, however defined Identify “ junior leaders” who are ready to scaffold their "leadership" roles with younger youth; have them serve as the "youth bridge.” Align recommendations with significant moments in the school year, college application process, etc. (e.g., a fun game jam might be perfect right after stressful Regents week; an oppor tunity highlighting college pathways or scholarship opportunities would be helpful for high school juniors in the spring, for seniors in early fall; etc.) Understand and analyze the impacts of structural barriers that youth face. Analyze the impact on ourselves as educators. Interrogate our own relationships to structural oppression. Acting as the “human bridge” to new places and people (e.g., organizing a field trip to an org; introducing a youth to another educator) Making a presentation about your program during class time at a school. Talk to youth about other programs (at pop-up events, during your program). Help them register. Saturday, November 15, 14 Model - Interviews (youth, Hive educators, teaching artists) - Observations of Hive programs and events - Youth Trajectories meetings (Charrette, Affinity Group) - YT pilot initiatives (Hive Youth Meetups; Text Connect; Hive Teen Mailing List) - Hive community engagement (community calls, cohort calls, community meet-ups) - Background literature
  8. 8. Hive NYC Community Brokering "Bridging or linking youth to opportunities, individuals, and/or offline and online resources that can suppor t their engagement in interest-driven learning toward various personal, academic, professional and civic goals.” Family Adults Non-Family Adults Peers Aunts, Uncles Programs Internships Field trips Principals Mentors Role models Friends Cousins Institutions Events Books, Magazines Peer collaborators Hive educators College attainability resources Career attainability resources Teachers Cousins Parents Siblings Acquaintances Grandparents Caretaker Family friend Guidance counselors Teaching ar tists Mentors “Opportunities” “ Information Sources” “Social Connections” Websites Hive educators “Leveling up” internships Teachers Visits to professional spaces Conferences Capstone events Hive youth “Brokering” W ho brokers? Guidance Counselors W hat is brokered? Post-program: - Offer a way to ‘level-up’ in the org (e.g., co-teach the program, become a “student resident,” etc. ). Possibly base this on passion in addition to (or instead of) skill level. - Discuss other programs w youth and help them apply. - Help them learn about ways to continue (online, via a program, etc.) Networking events, meetups Facilitating connections by arranging f2f meeting; helping with applications, resumes, and cover letters; etc. Feel OK with referring youth to OTHER programs, so to spread the love! Develop more and closer relationships with teachers, guidance counselors, and mentors W hat does brokering look like? Helping a youth develop an ar tifact (e.g., video, playable game) or por tfolio that she can use to garner her next oppor tunity. Noting things they’ve made (“ar tifacts” ) or done; documentation, description Looking at their por tfolios (learning, artist, writing, etc.) Knowing our youth in terms of their • interests, likes and dislikes • aptitudes • academic, civic, professional goals • home life, “ life stuff” • activity (what sorts of activities they’ve engaged in) Conversations (during class, program, via email, while hanging out, during pizza time, at maker party events, etc.) Noting badges activity Social media activity (Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram are less personal than FB) Listening to youth presentations (classes, programs, capstone events, maker par ties, etc.) Noticing what they show up for and what they do there (programs, capstone events, maker par ties, school events, etc.) W hat are some ways to get to know youth? Have easy access to an up-to-date list of oppor tunities and info sources. Have helpful social networks for brokering. Check in with current and past youth on a regular basis. Let them know you’re following their activities. Think about the timing of our recommendations (for ex, tell youth about a program 1-2 weeks before the deadline). How can we be bet ter brokers? Keep in mind the program features that matter to youth. Friends there; possibility of making friends Whether or not it: - conflicts with another program or sports team activities. - taps an interest or curiosity. - is free; provides a stipend. - might lead to an internship or job afterwards. - involves access to computers. - involves exposure to a type of technology that the youth is excited about (Arduino, Unity, Scratch, mobile phone software). Geographic location (transit time from school; back home) General vibe of the place, based on looks, ppl who work there, neighborhood W hat program features mat ter to youth? Awareness of societal issues Helping a youth connect her current experience to future career or college plans. Forums Longer or more frequent interaction times (year-long, semester-long programs; inviting back youth, etc.) Shadowships Fellowship, Scholarship Opps Professional training Professional Mentoring Noting their interactions at events where there’s a lot of “ free choice” (e.g., maker par ties, Emoti- Con, etc.). Other brokers Help youth develop personal, academic, civic and professional goals. Show how an interest can grow into those long-term possible futures. Create “ ladders of opportunities” within your org or with other oppor tunities beyond your org; if possible, your org should function as the ladder “rails.” Youth development principles could be useful here: e.g. Having high expectations for young people; what a "caring adult" looks like/how they relate to young people; helping young people understand impact of their action/inaction on the broader community, however defined Identify “ junior leaders” who are ready to scaffold their "leadership" roles with younger youth; have them serve as the "youth bridge.” Align recommendations with significant moments in the school year, college application process, etc. (e.g., a fun game jam might be perfect right after stressful Regents week; an oppor tunity highlighting college pathways or scholarship opportunities would be helpful for high school juniors in the spring, for seniors in early fall; etc.) Understand and analyze the impacts of structural barriers that youth face. Analyze the impact on ourselves as educators. Interrogate our own relationships to structural oppression. Acting as the “human bridge” to new places and people (e.g., organizing a field trip to an org; introducing a youth to another educator) Making a presentation about your program during class time at a school. Talk to youth about other programs (at pop-up events, during your program). Help them register. Saturday, November 15, 14 Model
  9. 9. Hack the Brokering model! 1. Decide on which of the four posters you’d like to start with. 1. Use markers and post-its to annotate. [Pink post-its = challenges.] 3. After 15 minutes, switch to another poster!  Feel free to send more feedback [dixieching@gmail.com]  HRL will share revised model by end of November.
  10. 10. "Bridging or linking youth to opportunities, individuals, and/or offline and online resources that can suppor t their engagement in interest-driven learning toward various personal, academic, professional and civic goals.” Family Adults Non-Family Adults Peers Aunts, Uncles Programs Internships Field trips Principals Mentors Role models Friends Cousins Institutions Events Books, Magazines Peer collaborators Hive educators College attainability resources Career attainability resources Teachers Cousins Parents Siblings Acquaintances Grandparents Caretaker Family friend Guidance counselors Teaching ar tists Mentors “Opportunities” “ Information Sources” “Social Connections” Websites Hive educators “Leveling up” internships Teachers Visits to professional spaces Conferences Capstone events Hive youth “Brokering” W ho brokers? Guidance Counselors W hat is brokered? Post-program: - Offer a way to ‘level-up’ in the org (e.g., co-teach the program, become a “student resident,” etc. ). Possibly base this on passion in addition to (or instead of) skill level. - Discuss other programs w youth and help them apply. - Help them learn about ways to continue (online, via a program, etc.) Networking events, meetups Facilitating connections by arranging f2f meeting; helping with applications, resumes, and cover letters; etc. Feel OK with referring youth to OTHER programs, so to spread the love! Develop more and closer relationships with teachers, guidance counselors, and mentors W hat does brokering look like? Helping a youth develop an ar tifact (e.g., video, playable game) or por tfolio that she can use to garner her next oppor tunity. Noting things they’ve made (“ar tifacts” ) or done; documentation, description Looking at their por tfolios (learning, artist, writing, etc.) Knowing our youth in terms of their • interests, likes and dislikes • aptitudes • academic, civic, professional goals • home life, “ life stuff” • activity (what sorts of activities they’ve engaged in) Conversations (during class, program, via email, while hanging out, during pizza time, at maker party events, etc.) Noting badges activity Social media activity (Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram are less personal than FB) Listening to youth presentations (classes, programs, capstone events, maker par ties, etc.) Noticing what they show up for and what they do there (programs, capstone events, maker par ties, school events, etc.) W hat are some ways to get to know youth? Have easy access to an up-to-date list of oppor tunities and info sources. Have helpful social networks for brokering. Check in with current and past youth on a regular basis. Let them know you’re following their activities. Think about the timing of our recommendations (for ex, tell youth about a program 1-2 weeks before the deadline). How can we be bet ter brokers? Keep in mind the program features that matter to youth. Friends there; possibility of making friends Whether or not it: - conflicts with another program or sports team activities. - taps an interest or curiosity. - is free; provides a stipend. - might lead to an internship or job afterwards. - involves access to computers. - involves exposure to a type of technology that the youth is excited about (Arduino, Unity, Scratch, mobile phone software). Geographic location (transit time from school; back home) General vibe of the place, based on looks, ppl who work there, neighborhood W hat program features mat ter to youth? Awareness of societal issues Helping a youth connect her current experience to future career or college plans. Forums Longer or more frequent interaction times (year-long, semester-long programs; inviting back youth, etc.) Shadowships Fellowship, Scholarship Opps Professional training Professional Mentoring Noting their interactions at events where there’s a lot of “ free choice” (e.g., maker par ties, Emoti- Con, etc.). Other brokers Help youth develop personal, academic, civic and professional goals. Show how an interest can grow into those long-term possible futures. Create “ ladders of opportunities” within your org or with other oppor tunities beyond your org; if possible, your org should function as the ladder “rails.” Youth development principles could be useful here: e.g. Having high expectations for young people; what a "caring adult" looks like/how they relate to young people; helping young people understand impact of their action/inaction on the broader community, however defined Identify “ junior leaders” who are ready to scaffold their "leadership" roles with younger youth; have them serve as the "youth bridge.” Align recommendations with significant moments in the school year, college application process, etc. (e.g., a fun game jam might be perfect right after stressful Regents week; an oppor tunity highlighting college pathways or scholarship opportunities would be helpful for high school juniors in the spring, for seniors in early fall; etc.) Understand and analyze the impacts of structural barriers that youth face. Analyze the impact on ourselves as educators. Interrogate our own relationships to structural oppression. Acting as the “human bridge” to new places and people (e.g., organizing a field trip to an org; introducing a youth to another educator) Making a presentation about your program during class time at a school. Talk to youth about other programs (at pop-up events, during your program). Help them register. Saturday, November 15, 14 Happy Hacking! We’ll reconvene at 11:10…
  11. 11. Reflection 1. Comments or questions? 2. Any takeaways?
  12. 12. Why a “network perspective” on brokering? 1. We are a robust network with ways to communicate and share information. 2. Broker/Gatekeeper duality. Sometimes we’re recruiting and sometimes we’re placing. 3. Means a greater range of opportunities and meaningful relationships – “connective tissue” or “mesh of support.” 4. Over time, coordination costs will be offset by efficiency gains.
  13. 13. Brainstorm: Network-level initiatives 1. Break into groups. 2. Brainstorm possible solutions. 3. What exists? What are some larger solutions that I would want to be a part of? (by leading, helping to implement) 4. Create a project poster. How will your idea address any brokering issues or help you broker? 5. Share and Discussion.
  14. 14. Share out
  15. 15. Thank you! Stay updated at: hiveresearchlab.org @hiveresearchlab This project is made possible through the generous support of the Hive Digital Media and Learning Fund at the New York Community Trust. dolcelab

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