Pacific languages forum

697 views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
697
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Key Output – priority outcome – Strengthening Pacific Families and Communities in NZGovt priority – Promoting Pacific Cultures and LanguagesNPRT, MYL, Discussion paper, workshops with various Pacific interest groups
  • Significant proportions of Pacific communities live in New ZealandNew Zealand born Pacific people tend not to know or use their heritage languageMost younger Pacific people are New Zealand born Language loss is particularly apparent among children and young people in Pacific communities
  • Vision - more people using Pacific languages with skill and fluency in everyday situations, particularly children and young people. Pacific languages at risk - will be revitalised, and their future assured. Pacific peoples’ sense of personal and cultural belonging in New Zealand will be enhanced by the support given to Pacific languages. New Zealanders - will appreciate and value Pacific languages as a source of pride in New Zealand’s rich cultural diversity. Government and Pacific communities will be working collaboratively in partnership to protect and promote Pacific languages.
  • - outcomes will be achieved by applying five inter-related areas of intervention in language revitalisation - consistently identified by linguists and language planners as critical to the health of a language. - Language protection and promotion depends on achieving positive changes in all of these areas, for each of the three outcomes
  • Status - position of a language in societyK & A - proficiency skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing (needed to sustain language)Use – of language to communicateCA – awareness, valueCorpus – visual, written and oral resources of a language
  • Status - position of a language in societyK & A - proficiency skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing (needed to sustain language)Use – of language to communicateCA – awareness, valueCorpus – visual, written and oral resources of a language
  • Status - position of a language in societyK & A - proficiency skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing (needed to sustain language)Use – of language to communicateCA – awareness, valueCorpus – visual, written and oral resources of a language
  • During 2010, seven Pacific Community Action Plans were developedSamoan, Tongan, Cook Islands, Niue, Tokelau, Tuvalu and FijiCommunity Action Plans have short, medium and long term goalshelp Pacific communities achieve their aspirations for language revitalisationFurther Community Action Plans may be developed by other groups – WCC PAG Tongan CAP
  • Develop the action plans that will sit under the FrameworkRoll out in the regions in themselves with determine local approaches for communitiesDiscussions with agencies on smarter engagements ie sector wide forums
  • Break out groups or start discussion with full group
  • Pacific languages forum

    1. 1. Pacific Languages Framework<br />Presentation<br />Consultation Fono<br />August 2011<br />
    2. 2. Background<br />Status of Pacific languages<br />Purpose, Aim and Vision<br />Framework<br />Next steps<br />Contents <br />
    3. 3. Background<br />Key output for the Ministry and supports the priority outcome: “Strengthening Pacific Families and Communities in New Zealand” Ministry’s SOI 2011 - 14. Government priority “Promoting Pacific Cultures and Languages”The Framework also builds on Ministry led initiatives – NPRT, MYL, a discussion paper prepared by Professor Stephen May on the rationale for a Pacific languages strategy, and workshops held with various Pacific interest groups to date.<br />
    4. 4. shifts towards English as the preferred language<br />some languages face serious loss (Niue, Tokelau, CI)<br />language transmission between generations has almost ceased<br />the use of Pacific languages is limited to use in the private domains of the family and church<br />Status of Pacific Languages<br />
    5. 5. Between the 2001 and 2006 censuses greatest losses were for:<br />Samoan language (4 percentloss)<br />Tokelauan language (4 percentloss)<br />Cook Island Mäori (2 percent loss) <br />Niuean(2 percent loss)<br />This rate of decline may see some of these languages no longer spoken in New Zealand<br />Status of Pacific Languages cont.<br />
    6. 6. Purpose<br />to revitalise, promote and maintain the use of Pacific languages in New Zealand<br />to lead and coordinate government policy, funding and services that support Pacific communities to retain their languages in New Zealand <br />Pacific Languages Framework<br />
    7. 7. Aim<br />
    8. 8. Framework<br />
    9. 9.
    10. 10. Outcomes<br />
    11. 11. Intervention areas<br />
    12. 12. Linking the interventions to the Framework<br />
    13. 13. OUTCOME 1: INDIVIDUAL<br />
    14. 14. OUTCOME 2: FAMILY AND COMMUNITY<br />
    15. 15. OUTCOME 3: SOCIETY<br />
    16. 16. Community Action Plans<br />
    17. 17. Consultation fono<br />Revise and finalise PLF<br />Finalise Community Action Plans<br />Finalise Cabinet paper<br />Inter-Agency Action Plan and Monitoring/Evaluation Framework<br />Next steps<br />
    18. 18. Discussion <br />and <br />Feedback<br />
    19. 19. Questions for discussion<br />Do you support what we have in the framework? If not, why not?<br />Are there areas we can improve, add or strengthen? If so, what are they?<br />Is there anything we have missed? <br />Is there another approach we should consider?<br />

    ×