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DIVERSIFOOD Final Congress - Session 2 - Underutilizated/forgotten crops: multi-actor and on farm evaluation

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"Underutilizated/forgotten crops: multi-actor and on farm evaluation": Keynote by Ambrogio Costanzo, ORC, UK
"Participatory assessment of local and traditional varieties of wheat in South Spain" by Maria Carrascosa, RAS, Spain
"Re-discovering ancient wheat population for organic farming in Hungary" by Dóra Drexler, ÖMKI, Hungary
"Lathyrus sativus and L. cicera germplasm characterization and breeding" by Diego Rubiales, CSIC, Spain
"Antinutritive ingredients in grain legume species for organic fodder" by Gilles Altmann, IBLA, Luxembourg
"Resistance screening of pea against a complex of root pathogens" by Lukas Wille, FiBL, Switzerland
"The Honeycomb Selection Designs in Participatory Breeding trials with cowpea" by Dionysia Fasoula, ARI, Cyprus
"Microbial communities and plant breeding: challenges and perspectives" by Michalis Omirou, ARI, Cyprus
"Chickpea genotypes response on drought and its impact on mycorrhizal symbiosis" by Athanasia-Eleni Kavadia, ARI, Cyprus
"Mobilising still diversity for minor cereals in West of France"
by Estelle Serpolay, ITAB, France

Published in: Food
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DIVERSIFOOD Final Congress - Session 2 - Underutilizated/forgotten crops: multi-actor and on farm evaluation

  1. 1. Underutilised crops: multi-actor and on-farm evaluation Session 2 Cultivating Diversity and Food Quality DIVERSIFOOD Final Congress Rennes, France, 10 December 2018
  2. 2. This session •  Keynote speech: Lessons learned from DIVERSIFOOD WP2 •  Poster presentations •  Slot 1 •  From genetic resources to breeding •  Slot 2 •  From quality back to the rhizosphere •  Slot 3 •  Participatory evaluation of cereal genetic resources •  Overall discussion
  3. 3. Diversity of plants, diversity of people Ambrogio Costanzo, WP2 leader The Organic Research Centre
  4. 4. Why underutilised crops? Background and working hypotheses
  5. 5. 250,000 plant species (identified) 12 plant species + 5 animal species 75% of world’s food 60% of total caloric input: •  WHEAT •  RICE •  MAIZE3 United Nations Food and Agricultural Organisation (1997) 7,000 crops used for food worldwide through History
  6. 6. •  Effective low-input/organic husbandry and crop adaptation in fluctuating environments •  Support local market and diverse diets •  Boost ecosystem functioning and resilience Why is it so important to widen the diversity of crops? weed control pollination buckwheat grain
  7. 7. •  A plant genetic resource … Be that either a species or a germplasm, or a genetic structure •  with limited current use … having been either forgotten or abandoned, or not yet explored •  and potential to diversify and improve … the focus is set on the advantages we expect •  cropping systems and supply chains … both cropping systems and supply chains are target of diversification to improve sustainability, resilience and health in the field, the market and the diet •  in a given context the reality, in geographic, historic, social, economic terms, in which the case for the underutilised crop is embedded A working definition of underutilised crops Not just “old” germplasms: an approach open to innovation … in a plurality of dimensions, “from field to fork” Embedded in contexts: “communities” Not for the sake of preserving, bot to ensure benefits …
  8. 8. Outsider species •  Quinoa •  Chickpeas in the UK, … Neglected species •  Rivet wheat •  Emmer, Einkorn, Buckwheat, … Alternative germplasm of common species •  Open-pollinated broccoli •  Maize OPVs, wheat CCPs, … Depending on the context: the environment and the community A working definition of underutilised crops
  9. 9. Questions from the communities Minor cereals: Alternative to wheat, but few varieties, no agronomic knowledge Brassicas: No OPVs available Tomato: Leaf mould resistance in humid areas? Buckwheat: Too few varieties for grain production Pulses/cereal intercrops: No diversity in legumes Wheat: non-adapted varieties for organic
  10. 10. What and how to evaluate Lessons learned from 33 trials on 12 species in 9 Countries
  11. 11. Crop descriptors Interactions with the agroecoystem Production Product quality
  12. 12. Crop descriptors 1.  Legality – identification – “DUS” 2.  Practicality • Description, • Accidental mixtures … 3.  Heterogeneous material
  13. 13. Blue White Red Not necessarily so easy and straightforward Crop descriptors
  14. 14. Three Different Populations and Landraces “Heterogeneous Material” Crop descriptors
  15. 15. Crop descriptors
  16. 16. Crop descriptors Lessons learned 1.  Traits lost during modern breeding •  some undesired 2.  Diversity between entries 3.  Diversity within entries •  Accidental mixtures •  Heterogeneous material Farmers Processors Seed companies Researchers Consumers Breeders Authorities Multiple needs and tools for description and Identification
  17. 17. Agroecosystem performance e.g. soil fertility e.g. water availability e.g. soil fertility e.g. water availability HYV abandoned input What are Improved Seeds? An Epistemology of the Green Revolution Lakshman Yapa - Economic Geography Vol. 69, No. 3, Environment and Development, Part 1 (Jul., 1993), pp. 254-273
  18. 18. Agroecosystem performance Local climate variation Local soil features Nutrient availability Weed pressure Pest and disease pressure Local management Rhizosphere and soil biota Entomofauna
  19. 19. Agroecosystem performance milling wheat emmer Minor cereals UK field performance on “Blue Clay” soils
  20. 20. Agroecosystem performance failing commercial milling wheat average yielding, yellow rust-prone emmer good yielding, healthy, tall and lodging-prone rivet variable/good yield and extreme tillering in einkorn average wheat population PCA 60% Expl. Var. Minor cereals UK field performance on “Blue Clay” soils See Poster Costanzo A. Amos D. Dinelli G. (2018)
  21. 21. Agroecosystem performance Buckwheat UK field performance Weed suppressive ability Sandy loam 21 Crop biomass Weed biomass
  22. 22. Agroecosystem performance Lessons learned •  Fitness to environment •  E.g. tolerance of abiotic stresses •  Many other services other than yield •  Ground cover •  Weed suppression •  Pollination •  Disease reduction •  Performance (= service magnitude, stability and resilience) is highly local •  Great diversity = possible to find locally fit genetic resources 22 Improved cropping systems
  23. 23. Productive performance •  Generally, in DIVERSIFOOD experimental conditions (mostly organic/low-input farms) comparable with commercial crops •  Can be a relief for marginal areas •  Can be the Achille’s heel •  Can be both, depending on the environment
  24. 24. Productive performance UK 2016/17 “Blue clay” dry spring and wet summer UK 2017/18 Sandy loam cold long winter and dry summer Minor cereals vs. mainstream wheat
  25. 25. Productive performance Lessons learned •  Where are underutilised outperforming mainstream? •  Beyond mere quantity •  Length of harvest season (e.g. vegetables) •  Acceptance in big vs. “small” distribution (e.g. heterogeneity of vegetable products) •  Stability over time vs. stability over space
  26. 26. Quality performance •  processing •  organoleptic •  nutritional •  intangible Farmers Processors Seed companies Researchers Consumers Breeders Authorities
  27. 27. Quality performance Processing •  Suitability for artisanal processing as more flexible •  Logistics challenges e.g. cereals •  Batches of diverse grains: adapting processing needed •  Different, small batches of grains: economies of scale?
  28. 28. Quality performance Nutritional •  Active compounds and their dependence on environment a ab b b p = .003 ** Einkorn, UK 2018 Total Dietary Fibre See Poster Costanzo A. Amos D. Dinelli G. (2018)
  29. 29. •  Active compounds and their dependence on environment Einkorn, UK 2018 DPPH (antioxidant power) FRAP (antioxidant capacity) p = .000 *** p = .000 *** LF = einkorn after oats (“low-fert”) HF = einkorn after grass-clover ley (“high-fert”) Quality performance Nutritional See Poster Costanzo A. Amos D. Dinelli G. (2018)
  30. 30. •  Cultural, identity values associated to a product •  The ‘Cultural Ecosystem Services’ according to Millennium Ecosystem Assessment? Quality performance Intangible
  31. 31. Quality performance Lessons learned •  Artisanal = flexible processing •  Measurable aspects: dependent on environment •  Nutritional/nutraceutical: get the right message out •  Effects of processing? •  Diet changes are complex •  Understand growing conditions (not predictable “by the book”) •  Non-measurable aspects: the story behind a product •  Make sure the story is true
  32. 32. Multi-actor and on-farm Lessons learned and open questions
  33. 33. Organising the acquired knowledge Database of DIVERSIFOOD WP2 results online soon
  34. 34. Multi-actor and on-farm Farmers Processors Seed companies Researchers Consumers Breeders Authorities How to make this landscape a community?
  35. 35. … and the trial moved into an experimental station, to test minor cereals in a factorial design Multi-actor and on-farm
  36. 36. Multi-actor and on-farm Lessons learned •  On-farm ≠ Participatory and Multi-actor •  Beware of simplifications •  Quality (not quantity) of the interaction •  A lot of enthusiasm but what structures do we need to scale it up and out? •  Relevance of the research questions (to whom?) •  The constructivist hypothesis that the more different actors involved in decisions, the less likely to overlook something important
  37. 37. Some conclusive questions Underutilised crops: asset to diversify and revive European agriculture? No instruction book, but a continuous process 1.  requires distributed and continuous innovation 2.  needs embedding research in farming and vice-versa 3.  maintaining reliable and FAIR* data and knowledge warehouses *findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable
  38. 38. Thanks for your attention Ambrogio Costanzo, WP2 leader The Organic Research Centre
  39. 39. Underutilised crops: multi-actor and on-farm evaluation Session 2 Cultivating Diversity and Food Quality DIVERSIFOOD Final Congress Rennes, France, 10 December 2018
  40. 40. Slot 1: From genetic resources to breeding 1. Lathyrus sativus and L. cicera germplasm characterization and breeding •  Rubiales et al. 2. The Honeycomb Selection Designs in Participatory Breeding trials with cowpea •  Fasoula et al. 3. Multiple-criteria approach to select drought-resistant maize populations •  Vaz Patto et al.
  41. 41. Lathyrus sativus and L. cicera germplasm characterization and breeding RUBIALES, GONZÁLEZ-BERNAL, SANTOS, MARTINS, SAMPAIO, GONÇALVES, PEREIRA, VAZ PATTO
  42. 42. Lathyrus sativus and L. cicera germplasm characterization and breeding Objective •  Reintroduce the crops in Mediterranean rainfed farming systems Methods •  Characterize germplasm collections •  Generate segregating populations •  Select under multiple environments Ancient legume crops that are largely neglected today in spite of their rusticity and value for food and feed for more sustainable farming systems
  43. 43. Main result -  Breeding program undergoing: -  Cultivars already submitted for registration -  Interspecific hybridisation program -  Tools to assist selection developed Lathyrus sativus and L. cicera germplasm characterization and breeding -  Consumers awareness raised
  44. 44. •  Grasspea and chickling peas are resilient crops ready to be reintroduced in our crop rotations Take Home Message Lathyrus sativus and L. cicera germplasm characterization and breeding
  45. 45. The Honeycomb Selection Designs in Participatory Breeding Trials with Cowpea Dionysia A. Fasoula, Michalis Omirou, Ioannis M. Ioannides Agricultural Research Institute (ARI), CYPRUS
  46. 46. The Honeycomb Selection Designs in Participatory Breeding Trials with Cowpea Objective – Research Question •  Can we inverse the local cowpea landrace degeneration and improve its fresh pod yield exploiting the potentialities of the Honeycomb Selection Designs and the novel concept of “Nonstop Selection” Methods - Innovation •  Long-term trials (9 years) with individual plants grown in the absence of any interplant interference (i.e., competition) and allocated according to the principles of one of the many Honeycomb Selection Designs
  47. 47. The Honeycomb Selection Designs in Participatory Breeding Trials with Cowpea •  Nonstop selection dramatically improved fresh pod yields (annual genetic gain > 20%) without any artificial cross- fertilization and showing no signs of levelling-off, to the excitement of the farmers involved
  48. 48. The Honeycomb Selection Designs in Participatory Breeding Trials with Cowpea •  In summary: a very successful, evolutionary (nonstop) way to overcome yield stagnation and generate more intra-species diversity through exploitation of the individual plant and the potentialities of the Honeycomb Selection Designs that control soil heterogeneity and the negative effects of interplant competition •  dfasoula@ari.gov.cy •  Acknowledgements to all our technical and field staff at ARI Take Home Message
  49. 49. Multiple-criteria approach to select drought-resistant maize populations M. Catarina Bicho, Mara L. Alves, Susana T. Leitão, Emanuel Ferreira, Daniela Santos, Pedro Mendes-Moreira, J. Miguel Costa, M. Carlota Vaz Patto
  50. 50. Multiple-criteria approach to select drought-resistant maize populations Objective What parameters to combine for an expedite, efficient and non-invasive drought resistance field selection? Methods Thermography, chlorophyll fluorescence and leaf gas exchange integration on field population evaluations
  51. 51. Main result •  OJIP test: the most expedite and efficient discriminatory measures under WD •  The optimal selection drought severity depends on the variety (maturity group) Multiple-criteria approach to select drought-resistant maize populations water deficit treatment well- watered treatment
  52. 52. Increased efficiency H2020 Diversifood (N. 633571), FCT (IF/ 01337/2014, UID/Multi/04551/2013) cpatto@itqb.unl.pt Take Home Message Multiple-criteria approach to select drought-resistant maize populations ... add OJIP test to selection + easiness to score
  53. 53. Underutilised crops: multi-actor and on-farm evaluation Session 2 Cultivating Diversity and Food Quality DIVERSIFOOD Final Congress Rennes, France, 10 December 2018
  54. 54. Slot 2: From quality back to the rhizosphere 1.  Antinutritive ingredients in grain legume species for organic fodder Kessler et al. 2.  Resistance screening of pea against a complex of root pathogens Hohmann et al. 3.  Chickpea genotypes response on drought and its impact on mycorrhizal symbiosis Kavadia et al. 4.  Microbial communities and plant breeding: challenges and perspectives Omirou et al.
  55. 55. On the suitability of different grain legume species for organic fodder production Gilles Altmann Keßler S., Zimmer S., Stoll E., Heidt H., Schulz H., Bohn T., Heß J.
  56. 56. On the suitability of different grain legume species for organic fodder production Objective Do antinutritive and nutritive substances in different grain legume species vary between different cultivars and growth conditions in Luxembourg and Germany significantly? Methods Both sites are under organic farming. The field trial was done in a randomized block design with four repetitions for two years.
  57. 57. On the suitability of different grain legume species for organic fodder production Main result Although most anti-nutritive contents (alkaloids, trypsin inhibitor activity, vicine/convicine and tannin) are within the ranges reported in literature, significant variations between varieties, sites and growing seasons were observed.
  58. 58. On the suitability of different grain legume species for organic fodder production The results show that the calculation of grain legumes in the feed ration should not exclusively refer to literature values of nutritive and antinutritive substances, as the locally produced grain legumes may differ significantly depending on the year and location. Take Home Message
  59. 59. Resistance screening of pea against a complex of root-rot pathogens Lukas Wille¹,², Bruno Studer¹, Monika M. Messmer², Natacha Bodenhausen², Pierre Hohmann² 1 Department of Crop Sciences – Plant Breeding and Variety Testing, Research Institute for Organic Agriculture (FiBL) 2 Institute of Agricultural Sciences – Molecular Plant Breeding, ETH Zürich
  60. 60. Pea Resistance Screening – Our Approach •  Identify pea lines resistant against pathogen complexes è Controlled conditions screening systems •  Elucidate the genetic basis of polygenic resistances è Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) •  Understand resistance-related plant-microbe interactions è qPCR and high-throughput amplicon sequencing
  61. 61. •  Resistance assays: Variation in different disease parameters PC 1- 40.72% r.aspect r.darkbr cortex decay shoot lesion dis. height wilted nodes shoot height diff. NS/S root biomass ratios NS/S no.nodules shoot biomass ratio NS/S shoot biomass diff. NS/S PC2- 19.84% Pea Resistance Screening - Results •  Microbiome analysis: putative pathogens and beneficials in the rhizosphere
  62. 62. Take Home Message Include plant-microbe interactions in breeding programmes Pea Resistance Screening Wille et al. 2018. Plant Cell Environ
  63. 63. Mycorrhizal symbiosis and nutrient content in different chickpea genotypes under limited water availability A.Kavadia, D.A.Fasoula, M.Omirou, I.M.Ioannides Department of Agrobiotechnology Agricultural Research Institute, Cyprus
  64. 64. Mycorrhizal symbiosis and nutrient content in different chickpea genotypes under limited water availability Objective •  Evaluation of drought tolerant traits on chickpea genotypes and the role of mycorrhizal fungi on drought response Methods •  Pot experiment with 2 chickpea gen. and 2 water availability levels •  Completely Randomized Design (CRD)
  65. 65. Mycorrhizal symbiosis and nutrient content in different chickpea genotypes under limited water availability Main result •  Chickpea response to drought stress is related to plant genotype and its ability to establish efficient AMF symbiosis
  66. 66. Mycorrhizal symbiosis and nutrient content in different chickpea genotypes under limited water availability •  This study suggests that the symbiosis between the appropriate chickpea genotype and AMF improves: •  plant fitness under drought conditions and •  nutrient use efficiency •  akavadia@ari.gov.cy Thank you for your attention
  67. 67. Microbial communities and plant breeding: challenges and perspectives Michalis Omirou1, Dionysia Fasoula1, Veronique Chamble2, Ioannis M. Ioannides1 Department of Agrobiotechnology, Agricultural Research Institute, Nicosia, Cyprus Sciences pour l'Action et le Développement (SAD) - UMR BAGAP , INRA, France
  68. 68. Microbial communities and plant breeding: challenges and perspectives Objective – Research Question •  How microbial communities and functional soil microbial guilds can assist the selection of the best performing plants? •  Is there any direct association between microbial diversity and plant breeding Methods - Innovation •  Honeycomb designs •  7 maize genotypes •  13 chickpea genotypes •  6 local cowpea genotypes •  AMF colonization and extraradical mycelium was assessed •  NFB were isolated and tested
  69. 69. Microbial communities and plant breeding: challenges and perspectives •  All crops tested exhibited different symbiotic characteristics between them as well as within the same species. •  High AMF colonization was not always reflected to high plant yields. •  NFB are affecting AMF colonization and plant performance and is genotype depended Underutilized cereals Maize
  70. 70. Microbial communities and plant breeding: challenges and perspectives In summary: •  Functional microbial communities are of paramount importance for plant performance particularly under stressful conditions. •  Selection, characterization and application of these functional microbial guilds along with their associated genotypes could a useful strategy to improve plant performance. •  michalis.omirou@ari.gov.cy •  Acknowledgements to all our technical and field staff at ARI Take Home Message
  71. 71. Underutilised crops: multi-actor and on-farm evaluation Session 2 Cultivating Diversity and Food Quality DIVERSIFOOD Final Congress Rennes, France, 10 December 2018
  72. 72. Slot 3: Participatory evaluation of cereal genetic resources 1. Re-discovering ancient wheat populations for organic farming in Hungary Drexler et al. 2. Participatory assessment of local and traditional varieties of wheat in South Spain Carrascosa et al. 3. Mobilising still diversity for minor cereals in West of France Serpolay et al.
  73. 73. Re-discovering ancient wheat populations for organic farming in Hungary Dóra Drexler, Marianna Makádi, Attila Tomócsik, Szilvia Bencze
  74. 74. Re-discovering ancient wheat populations for organic farming in Hungary Objective •  10 emmer and 5 einkorn varieties were tested under organic conditions to assess their performance and potential for local organic cultivation. Methods •  Seeds were acquired from gene banks and breeding institutes of 3 countries •  Trial site had marginal acidic sandy soil •  Low input cultivation was applied
  75. 75. Re-discovering ancient wheat populations for organic farming in Hungary Main result Most important factors: •  Winter hardiness •  Yellow rust susceptibility •  Weed infestation •  Landrace yields were similar to registered varieties’ yields! 0 0,5 1 1,5 2 2,5 3 3,5 4 4,5 5 6. 2. 6. 9. 6. 16. 6. 23. 6. 30. Average leaf surface coverage of yellow rust (%) Mv Hegyes NÖDIK Tönke GT 143 GT 196 GT 381 GT 831 GT 1399 GT 1400 GT 1402
  76. 76. Re-discovering ancient wheat populations for organic farming in Hungary •  Emmer and einkorn are viable alternatives for organic farmers also under marginal growing conditions. •  Einkorn has strong disease tolerance •  Landrace yields are not lower that reg. varieties’ Dóra Drexler ÖMKi, Hungarian Research Institute of Organic Agriculture dora.drexler@biokutatas.hu Take Home Message
  77. 77. Participatory assessment of traditional varieties of wheat in the south of Spain María Carrascosa-García, Juan José Soriano Niebla, Alonso Navarro Chaves, Salvatore Ceccarelli, Eugenia Roldán, José Antonio Fulgado, Marta González, Maria Pérez Picón.
  78. 78. Participatory assessment of traditional varieties of wheat in the south of Spain Objective To generate basic information on the morphological, phenological and agronomic characteristics of traditional varieties of wheat and their behaviour in Andalusian dry lands in agro-ecologically managed farms, for the promotion of their use. Methods The incorporation of agro- ecological farmers in all the phases of the research.
  79. 79. Participatory assessment of traditional varieties of wheat in the south of Spain Main result Sheets of the 12 varieties and populations assessed. Trigo Chamorro de Los Portales DESCRIPTOR RESULTADO Estadios de crecimiento Días entre la siembra y la nacencia 13-89 (35,75 media) Días entre la siembra y el encañado 105-148 (124,57 media) Días entre la siembra y el espigado 126-169 (138,56 media) Días entre la siembra y la maduración 139-194 (152,06 media) Días entre la siembra y maduración fisiológica 179-207 (190,69 media) Días entre la siembra y la recolección 196-223 (209,42 media) Rendimiento espigas (kg) 0,142-1,851 (0,79 media) Rendimiento grano (kg) 0,078-1,111 (0,46 media) Rendimiento paja (kg) 0,293-3,57 (1,35 media) Peso de 50 granos (gr) 1,2-2,4 (2,15 media) Caracterización morfológica Planta Ahijamiento (promedio). 1. Ausente 2. Presente 1,76 Número de hijuelos por planta 1-6 (3,1 media) Hábito de crecimiento (promedio). 1. Postrado 2. Intermedio 3. Erecto 1,52 (intermedio-postrado) Vitalidad de la planta (promedio)- 1. Alta 2. Media 3. Baja 1,16 (alta-media) Homogeneidad de la planta 95,83% espigado, 4,17% color Espigado de los hijuelos (promedio). 1. Elevado >70%, 2. Medio 70-40%, 3. Bajo <40%, 4.Nulo 0 1,36 (elevado-medio) Altura de la planta (cm) 59-132 (94,64 media) Barbas o aristas Longitud de las barbas (cm) Ausencia Rugosidad de las barbas NP Color de las barbas NP Espiga Longitud de la espiga (mm) 42-105 (71,22 media) Número de granos por espiga 1-42 (20,93 media) Peso de los granos de una espiga (gr) 0,2-2,2 (0,92 media) Glumas Color de la gluma Blanco Granos Color de los granos Blanco Características agronómicas Poder emergente (promedio). 1. Alto 2. Bajo 1,04 (alto) Encamado (promedio) 1. Ausente 2. Presente 1,83 Resistencia enfermedades (promedio). 1. Alta 2. Media 3. Baja 1,04 (alta) Resistencia a plagas: Alta Competencia con vegetación adventicia (promedio). 1. Alta 2. Media 3. Baja 1,55 (media-alta) Resistencia a heladas Alta Resistencia al calor Alta Resistencia a la falta de agua Alta
  80. 80. Participatory assessment of traditional varieties of wheat in the south of Spain •  The active involvement of farmers in the description and assessment of traditional varieties (evaluation of the protocols, trial management, data collection, etc.) is very positive for the development and strengthening of the community cultivated biodiversity management. •  Variety sheets are valuable tools for the communication and dissemination of the potential of the diversity of wheat. info@redandaluzadesemillas.org info@redandaluzadesemillas.org Take Home Message
  81. 81. Mobilising still diversity for minor cereals in West of France Serpolay-Besson Estelle1, Kutelmak argaux, Flipon Emma, Villard Anne-Lise2, Leprêtre Franck-Emmanuel3, Chable Véronique2 1 ITAB (Institut Technique de l’Agriculture Biologique), France, itab.asso.fr, estelle.serpolay- besson@itab.asso.fr 2 INRA de Rennes, France, www.rennes.inra.fr/sad-bcrp,veronique.chable@inra.fr 3Triptolème, France, www.triptoleme.org, fe.lepretre@gmail.com
  82. 82. Mobilising still diversity for minor cereals in West of France Objective Wake up the « stilling treasures » sleeping the gene banks by designing rapidly and efficiently diversified populations adapted to organic agriculture for high quality products Methods Combining research skills and means with farmers’ demand through an innovative methodology: designing of diversified an personalised populations by bulking several complementary accessions with common traits of interests for on-farm evaluation and dynamic management
  83. 83. Mobilising still diversity for minor cereals in West of France Good success of the methodology among farmers in 2018 for Rivet Wheat Main result
  84. 84. Mobilising still diversity for minor cereals in West of France Take Home Message A tool to mobilise rapidly and efficiently still diversity for on-farm adaptation and evolution To be tested for Organic and Participatory Plant Breeding! estelle.serpolay-besson@itab.asso.fr Many thanks to Audrey, Emma and Margaux for all the work done!
  85. 85. Underutilised crops: multi-actor and on-farm evaluation Session 2 Cultivating Diversity and Food Quality DIVERSIFOOD Final Congress Rennes, France, 10 December 2018
  86. 86. THANK YOU Looking forward to seeing you at the posters

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