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Case OK Study Centre (by Marion Fields)

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OBF Academy webinar 26th Jan. 2016.

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Case OK Study Centre (by Marion Fields)

  1. 1. Making competences acquired in voluntary organisations visible: experiences of designing badges for training and learning by doing in the voluntary sector Marion Fields Coordinator, OK Study Centre 28.1.2016 1
  2. 2. OK Study Centre • A nationwide non-formal adult education provider funded mainly by the Finnish Government. • We organise, study, develop, supervise and fund training in NGOs. – We have 69 member organisations and ca. 150, 000 occasional students anually • In recent years we have undertaken many R&D activities to develop new ways to validate learning in the voluntary sector. 28.1.2016 2
  3. 3. Our badge story so far… • We have been involved in several projects to develop open badge concepts. – We participated in a large project with Discendum, during which we built a website and organised training for our members. – We are in a Nordic project called open badges for Adult Educators, which focuses on bringing badges to the adult education community 28.1.2016 3
  4. 4. What have we ended up with? • We now have: – A badge infrastructure for our training courses +meta-level badges for completing a ’training path’ – 2 badges to recognise learning outcomes from volunteering; more badges to come – A badge for adult educators – A website + supervision for members 28.1.2016 4
  5. 5. Examples of badges created for volunteering purposes • We have created badges together with member NGOs with common criteria. • Badges created for skill batches: Chairperson, ’peer champion’, event organiser. • Application with evidence, organisations issue them independently. 28.1.2016 5
  6. 6. AdEO: Educator’s badge! 28.1.2016 6 Serves as an introduction for educators and trainers. You need 5 small pieces of evidence + a reflection. https://openbadge.wordpress.com/
  7. 7. Our way of thinking about Open Badges • Competencies gained by participation in non-formal education or volunteering activity are real and useful and they can be validated and made visible. • Badges are a really good way of recognising skills acquired outside the classroom. – For informal learning by volunteering, one can devise the criteria more loosely than for courses, which is welcomed by voluntary organisations • There are many forums for validation: e.g. inside the voluntary sector 28.1.2016 7
  8. 8. Benefits we have noticed There are benefits for both individuals and organisations: • Individuals can find a new way of making their skills visible, which is motivating and empowering. • Can give voluntary organisations publicity and a competitive edge: badges are already used in volunteer recruitment. • Courses in our field are planned and carried out by professionals, but aren’t always well known. Badges help in making learning outcomes visible. 28.1.2016 8
  9. 9. Experiences • We are pleased that we have got started! – Many badges have a fairly high acceptance rate. • Our members say that they have started to appreciate learning by doing more • Introduction takes time 28.1.2016 9 Thanks! This works! It’s a fine digital product, I hope people will start to issue more of these! -Sanna
  10. 10. Tips for voluntary organisations • Start small. What kinds of achievements are easy to ’wrap’ into a badge? • You might want to start by individual skills and achievements instead of batches. • Ask you volunteers: what skills are most important to them? • Identify success stories and use them in marketing badges. • Team up with other organsiations and endorse each other’s badges! 28.1.2016 10
  11. 11. Thank you! Marion Fields marion.fields@ok-opintokeskus.fi Twitter: @marion_fields 28.1.2016 11

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