Digital Tattoo for Student Teachers 2012

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workshop for student teachers @ UBC.

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  • Introductions: why do WE care? How many of you think you know what we mean when we refer to a digital tattoo? How many of you have one? How many are thinking about the impact of your digital tattoo (POSITIVELY OR NEGATIVELY) on your future professional life? We are planning to deal with that last question – not as a bunch of tips or suggestions but as some questions for you to reflect on.
  • Research question: Looking at whether or not (or how) this presentation shifts attitudes or practices of prospective teachers. Introductions: why do WE care? How many of you think you know what we mean when we refer to a digital tattoo? How many of you have one? How many are thinking about the impact of your digital tattoo (POSITIVELY OR NEGATIVELY) on your future professional life? We are planning to deal with that last question – impact of our digital tattoos - not as a bunch of tips or suggestions about what to do or not do but as some questions for you to reflect on.
  • We are going to use short mini-discussions and case studies in our presentation so you will be doing this. When we need to bring you back to the discussion, we’ll do that with the help of the bus stop sound.
  • So what do we know about tattoos? They can be a creative expression of ourselves as individuals… They can be beautiful…
  • … and they can look, feel or mean different things in different contexts – you might be judged on the basis of your tattoo – and they might influence opinions – assumptions may be made. Tattoos require a lot of careful consideration before they ’re acquired, we like to use the expression…think before you ink
  • For obvious reasons
  • Permanence online (may not be absolute) but as anyone knows who has tried to remove something about themselves (either created by you – or created by others) it is difficult. Why is that?
  • Identity might be considered an unresolved question – it is something that evolves over time in relation with others. You form your identity in relation to your social groups, your ideas, your family, community, culture, etc. Before social media, connections you formed were mainly in person, involved some knowledge of the other and what you did and said at any one particular time was quickly forgotten as you developed new ideas and ways of thinking. We were allowed to grow up in the context of time and are interactions were based on now. But online, our interactions are changed/influenced by a number of different factors that we didn’t have to deal with in pre-internet days.
  • Danah Boyd, Harvard Fellow and Researcher at Microsoft describes some key properties and dynamics that alter the way we interact with one another. These features include:   boyd, danah. 2009. "Social Media is Here to Stay... Now What?" Microsoft Research Tech Fest, Redmond, Washington, February 26. Retrieved March 10, 2009: http://www.danah.org/papers/talks/MSRTechFest2009.html
  • persistence (what you put out on the internet stays there) We should be aware that our online content is permanent. This is not only due to caching but because…all content in a digital space can be moved freely around the Web. US Olympic gymnast McKayla Maroney’s Twitter photo (left) ; photo on podium after a fall landed her a silver medal (right) – her “not impressed” expression landed her a meme on the internet – resulting in a tumbler stream highlighting the many ways that Kayla is not impressed. Nathan Ktylak – Water Polo athlete from Maple Ridge – 2 year ban placed on him – preventing him from competing on the National Water Polo team. Blogger Allie Osmar started her blog The Creative Career as a student at Michigan State University- - making the transition from student to work life in the PR field. 86,000 visitors later – she is still keeping it going. Mention NY Times article from 2010: The Web Means the End of Forgetting. Point is made that forgetting is important to forgiveness – forgiveness (of ourselves and others) is necessary for the development of wisdom. Surely we want to support the development of wisdom in our world – not squelch it. So, there are projects underway to look at how to encrypt data with expiration dates.   boyd, danah. 2009. "Social Media is Here to Stay... Now What?" Microsoft Research Tech Fest, Redmond, Washington, February 26. Retrieved March 10, 2009: http://www.danah.org/papers/talks/MSRTechFest2009.html
  • replicability (the cut and paste phenomenon): We should be aware that online content is permanent. This is not only due to caching but because…all content in a digital space can be moved freely around the Web. "cut and paste" culture allows rapid and widespread sharing of information, and it also means that photos, emails, IMs, comments, and more can be taken out of context and used in ways that the author didn't intend. While you own your digital identity or tattoo – you can’t control the behavior of others and their contributions to your digital tattoo – the best you can do is learn how to respond to it in a way that reflects your values.   boyd, danah. 2009. "Social Media is Here to Stay... Now What?" Microsoft Research Tech Fest, Redmond, Washington, February 26. Retrieved March 10, 2009: http://www.danah.org/papers/talks/MSRTechFest2009.html
  • scalability (what you say to one reaches many): People need to know that “being online is essentially being in public.” regardless of the passwords, email accounts and privacy settings we think are protecting us. Take protective measures, yes, but consider whether you ultimately want to share information publicly before posting anything, anywhere… This also raises the question of who is in your network – it might be time to prune your network – sometimes called profile pruning. according to a recent study by the Pew Research Centre on the Internet and American Life – profile pruning is on the rise.   boyd, danah. 2009. "Social Media is Here to Stay... Now What?" Microsoft Research Tech Fest, Redmond, Washington, February 26. Retrieved March 10, 2009: http://www.danah.org/papers/talks/MSRTechFest2009.html
  • The info you post about yourself may offer more than you intend it to about your activities – but sometimes – applications are gathering data about you – that you may not be aware of. The location based apps that offer convenience may also be collecting more information about you than you intend or are willing to share. The proliferation and use of location based services (like GPS services, restaurant locators, foursquare, road condition trackers, photo metadata) raises variety of questions that have yet to be answered, including: Privacy considerations : How do you effectively ensure the product design of location-based apps includes opt-in-opt out security for users?   Data security : What are the obligations of those who hold data gathered from such location-based services? What assurances are there that the information doesn't fall into unauthorized hands?   Notice to users and time limitations : Should the user receive information each time an app or service is used? Should there be an opt-out if the user objects to use of his or her information?   Data limitations: What amount of data should app developers be allowed to collect and for how long should they be allowed to store it?   boyd, danah. 2009. "Social Media is Here to Stay... Now What?" Microsoft Research Tech Fest, Redmond, Washington, February 26. Retrieved March 10, 2009: http://www.danah.org/papers/talks/MSRTechFest2009.html
  • (de)locatabilty (when we are everywhere-we are nowhere). Applications that are great at connecting us (at a distance from one another) may actually work to keep us apart when we are in proximity to each other. What effect does this have on attention and presence – and how might this have an impact or our identities outside of the digital realm? .   boyd, danah. 2009. "Social Media is Here to Stay... Now What?" Microsoft Research Tech Fest, Redmond, Washington, February 26. Retrieved March 10, 2009: http://www.danah.org/papers/talks/MSRTechFest2009.html
  • “ You can’t un-friend Mark Zuckerberg.” And that may be fine with you - Did anyone followed the proposal and subsequent squelching of the electronic surveillance bill – Bill C-30 – tabled in the house of Commons last year by Vic Toews? One criticism of the bill is that it adds “ significant new capabilities for investigators to track and search and seize digital information about individuals. ” National Post: Feb 14, 2012 – 2:59 PM ET On one hand, it dispels any illusion that we can have complete anonymity online. On another hand, it demonstrates that we are perhaps only a bill away from government elected officials accessing (and distributing) any of our online content. Still the illusion of anonymity persists and leads some people to behave and interact online in ways they wouldn’t face-to-face. Eg. We’ve all heard disturbing stories of cyberbullying, (share story with time), we’ve seen some stats on sexting… and though the media focuses its attention on them, we also know these behaviours aren’t limited to young adults. So we definitely need to ask “who” are we interacting with when we choose to participate and contribute online
  • invisible audiences, collapsed contexts and the blurring of public and private spaces means that we are dealing with a new, ever changing landscape of communication and relationship.   boyd, danah. 2009. "Social Media is Here to Stay... Now What?" Microsoft Research Tech Fest, Redmond, Washington, February 26. Retrieved March 10, 2009: http://www.danah.org/papers/talks/MSRTechFest2009.html
  • Douglas Rushkoff writes about this in his book: Program or Be Programmed: Ten Commandments for a Digital Age. On the positive side: access to information quickly and easily is tremendously democratizing. It can lead to valuable insights and connections. On the other side our machines are getting more complex as they are giving us simpler and simpler experiences/interfaces and we run the risk of having our technology learn more about us rather than us learning about it. We have smart phones, but are we smart enough to know about how it works – behind the scenes. Examples
  •  
  • Where were you on this spectrum? In a 2011 survey comparing online social networking behaviors of North Americans and EU populations only about ¼ of us are actually creating content. The rest of us are contributing to the conversations (joining). Why do you think that is? (roughly 60,000 NA respondents and 16,000 EU)
  • Easy and fast can often be a barrier to thoughtful decision making.
  • The next 3 case studies highlight 3 perspectives on digital identity: the educator ’s, the individual’s and the profession of teaching itself. We’ve chosen a selection of case studies to hightlight some of the issues and we’ll engage in snippets of discussion around each one. Looking at digital identity from these 3 perspectives raises particular issues, questions and general food for thought around perceptions of truth, personal freedom, professional responsibility and the boundaries between personal, social, work and professional spaces.
  • Stacy Snyder, then a 25-year-old teacher in training at Conestoga Valley High School in Lancaster, Pa., posted a photo on her MySpace page that showed her at a party wearing a pirate hat and drinking from a plastic cup, with the caption “Drunken Pirate.” After discovering the page, her supervisor at the high school told her the photo was “unprofessional,” and the dean of Millersville University School of Education, where Snyder was enrolled, said she was promoting drinking in virtual view of her under-age students. As a result, days before Snyder’s scheduled graduation, the university denied her a teaching degree. Snyder sued, arguing that the university had violated her First Amendment rights by penalizing her for her (perfectly legal) after-hours behavior. But in 2008, a federal district judge rejected the claim, saying that because Snyder was a public employee whose photo didn’t relate to matters of public concern, her “Drunken Pirate” post was not protected speech. Stacy ’s story is just one example of a challenge that faces all of us – in some way – how best to live our lives in an age where the Internet holds a public record of everything and forgets nothing.
  • This story raises the issue of the blurred lines between our personal and professional lives when we are sharing the same online platforms with students (Facebook, Twitter, etc). Some educators feel that teachers should avoid using social media with their students altogether – others (Toronto District School Board) are developing social media guidelines for its teachers.   In light of recent charges against a student teacher in Abbotsford, The Vancouver Board of Education has told its teachers flatly that communicating with students using personal e-mail accounts and being "friends" with students on social networking sites is "unacceptable behaviour."   Just over half of the teachers that responded to a survey by BC College of teachers a couple of years ago – said they refuse friend requests from students. Some say their Facebook connections deepen their understanding of students lives. Registrar of BC College of teachers feel that those connections may make students and teachers vulnerable.
  • Research question: Looking at whether or not (or how) this presentation shifts attitudes or practices of prospective teachers.
  • “ a humane society values privacy, because it allows people to cultivate different aspects of their personalities in different contexts; and at the moment, the enforced merging of identities that used to be separate is leaving many casualties in its wake. Stacy Snyder couldn’t reconcile her “aspiring-teacher self” with her “having-a-few-drinks self”: even the impression, correct or not, that she had a drink in a pirate hat at an off-campus party was enough to derail her teaching career. “ Privacy controls are important – especially when we have the power to choose for ourselves who sees what in terms of what we post online.
  • Quote from Mr. H: The biggest challenge is letting go. Being teachers we like the spotlight on us and what WE can do. Using technology becomes valuable when you set the task to the students in a simple way and just let them find new and different ways to complete it. Do not give them a roadmap for success. Make them find the signposts on the way to being successful. This is how they find new ways to complete assignments, teach other students what they have learned and become producers of information.
  • Digital Tattoo for Student Teachers 2012

    1. 1. Think Before You InkEDUC 316Anne ScholefieldJulie MitchellCindy Underhill
    2. 2. Pre – Workshop Survey …Please take 5 minutes to complete our survey:http://tinyurl.com/9boy327
    3. 3. Questions for reflection… What’s MY digital tattoo and why should Icare? What perspectives inform my digital identity? What 3 basic principles might help me makeand defend my decisions as I create, manageand own my digital identity?
    4. 4. meaning in context
    5. 5. highly visibleTR
    6. 6. ...and hard to removeTR
    7. 7. Principle 1…consider…Online identity is owned, it’s personal and itevolves over time – just like we do.
    8. 8. Dynamics that Change Interaction5 dynamics that influence what we do online boyd, danah. 2009. "Social Media is Here to Stay... Now What?"
    9. 9. Persistence…what you (or others) put on the internet stays thereThe goodThe uglyThe badMcKayla Maroney Twitter profilehttp://thecreativecareer.com/The ProvinceSeptember 27th, 2011Orland Kurtenblog
    10. 10. Replicabilitycontent can be taken out of context<embed><embed>RT@RT@
    11. 11. ScalabilityScalability: your networks, your networks’ networks and so on…
    12. 12. Searchabilityyou can be found
    13. 13. [De]locatability…when you are everywhere, you are nowhere.Photo from Inkyhack onFlickr:http://www.flickr.com/photos/inkyhack/4623622328/sizes/m/in/photostream/
    14. 14. The audience can be invisibleand anonymous
    15. 15. What does this mean?As Danah Boyd states: “One of the key challenges is learning how toadapt to an environment in which theseproperties and dynamics play a key role.”
    16. 16. Principle 2…consider…TRDigital tools have biases. One is towardsreducing complexity.
    17. 17. What’s YOUR digital tattoo?TRIn 2 minutes, generate a list of all of the waysyou have shared/published somethingdigitally in the last 24 hours and share with apartner.What tools did you use?How fast/easy was it to share?Why did you share it?How did you decide who to share it with?
    18. 18. Where are YOU on the line…?TextingFacebookTwitterGoogleCommentingminimal investmentTextingFacebookTwitterGoogleCommentingminimal investmentBloggingCreating/sharing digitalphotosCreating/sharing videoCreating/sharing music/artheavy investmentBloggingCreating/sharing digitalphotosCreating/sharing videoCreating/sharing music/artheavy investmentDocumenting/collectinginvestment variesDocumenting/collectinginvestment varies
    19. 19. Principle 3…consider…TRThoughtful, informed decisions require time andsufficient knowledge.
    20. 20. Digital Ink: 3 Perspectives#1: Individual#3:Profession#2:EducatorTR
    21. 21. The Individual: Stacy Snyder 2006: student teacher“drinking” called intoquestion. She was denied ateaching degree. 2008: judge rejected herclaim that this violated herFirst Amendment right tofree speech. 2010: her photo & storylives on in perpetuity.cu“Drunken Pirate”
    22. 22. Consider: your personal viewIn groups of 3, for 2 minutes, discuss: What are the issues that this case brings upfor you?Website: http://nyti.ms/dpAcKMcu
    23. 23. The Educator: Mr. H Offers a blog as supporthub to grade 8 Mathstudents Uses a variety of freelyavailable onlineplatforms for studentsto create and publish. Class accounts are usedand student blogs areprivate.cuMr. H’s support hub: http://sargentparkmathzone.blogspot.ca/
    24. 24. Consider: your view as an educatorIn groups of 3, for 2 minutes, discuss: What responsibility does a teacher have toteach students about being a responsibledigital citizen?cuWebsite: http://bit.ly/acjJi
    25. 25. The Profession: Teaching Ontario College ofteacherssocial media guidelines. Vancouver Boarddeems “friending” andpersonal email“unacceptable”. Blurred boundariesleave students andteachers vulnerable.AS
    26. 26. Broader Context:Teacher Regulation BranchStandard 2: Educators are role models who act ethicallyand honestly.“The Supreme Court of Canada has determined thateducators are held to a higher standard than othercitizens due to their unique role in society.”From: Teacher Regulation Branch (former College of Teachers):http://www.bcteacherregulation.ca/StandardsAS
    27. 27. Consider: your view as part of alarger professionIn groups of 3, for 3 minutes, discuss: How do you balance your professionalobligation to serve as a role model(standard#2) with your personal life online? What role (if any) do you want yourprofessional association to play in helping youwith this?ASWebsite: http://bit.ly/bTUAxo
    28. 28. TRDesign your digital tattoo...personalprofessionalpartofaprofession
    29. 29. Digital Tattoo TutorialTR
    30. 30. Post – Workshop Survey …Please take 5 minutes to complete the survey-Part 3:http://tinyurl.com/9n5j5n5You will likely be contacted in 6 months tocomplete Part 3 of the survey.
    31. 31. Resources BC Teacher Regulation Branch: Standards, Questions and Case Studieshttp://www.bcteacherregulation.ca/Standards/QuestionsCaseStudies.aspx  boyd, danah. 2009. "Social Media is Here to Stay... Now What?" Microsoft Research Tech Fest, Redmond, Washington, February 26.  Retrieved March 10, 2009: http://www.danah.org/papers/talks/MSRTechFest2009.html Digital Tattoo: digitaltattoo.ubc.ca Madden, M., Fox, S., Smith, A., & Vitak, J. (2007).Digital Footprints: Online Identity Management and Search in the Age of Transparency.  Pew/Internet. McBride, Melanie (2010)http://melaniemcbride.net/2009/08/27/putting-the-social-justice-in-social-media-pedagogy/ Ontario College’s “Use of Electronic Communication and Social Media”http://www.oct.ca/publications/PDF/Prof_Adv_Soc_Media_EN.pdf Rego, B. (2009). Teachers Guide to Using Facebook. Richardson, W. (2008, January). Teaching Civics with Social Web Tools. District Administration, 44(1), 56-56. Rosen, Jeffrey (2010) The Web Means the End of Forgetting, New York Times. Quan, Douglas (2010) Facebook Blurs Line Between Teacher and Friend, Vancouver Sun.tr
    32. 32. ResourcesClass Blogs Welcome to Blogging: class intro for elementary students -Sargeant Park Math Zone: http://bit.ly/du9X1k Create a Class Blog (2010)-Edublogger: http://bit.ly/7s2CZeReview/re-use this presentation:Slideshare: Digital Tattootr
    33. 33. The Broader Context: Policy andGuidelinesAShttp://socialmediaguidelines.pbworks.com/Faculty-and-Staff-GuidelinesThe government approachThe collective approachthe practical approach?
    34. 34. The Broader Context:The Web Means the End ofForgetting A humane society valuesprivacy – allows us tocultivate different aspectsof personality in differentcontexts “Societal forgetting”important – we learn andadjust our behavior basedon our mistakes. If we livein fear of making mistakes,we don’t learn/ grow ashuman beings.cuNew York Times: July 21, 2010
    35. 35. The Broader Context: TeachingDigital Citizenshipcu

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