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Digital Tattoo for UBC Teacher Candidates: Fall 2015

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This slide deck was used in the seminar for the Elementary cohort from UBC's Faculty of Education.

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Digital Tattoo for UBC Teacher Candidates: Fall 2015

  1. 1. Think Before You Ink Julie Mitchell, UBC Library (on leave) Cindy Underhill, CTLT
  2. 2. Identity Image credit: Shannon Kringen on Flickr licensed cc:by
  3. 3. digital identity and teachers… “As a field and society we should be willing to openly discuss these issues with understanding, patience, and recognition of the complexities surrounding SNS [social networking site] participation and social well-being.” Excerpt from: Kimmons, R.; Veletsianos, G (in press) Teacher Professionalization in the Age of Social Networking Sites: Identifying Major Tensions and Dilemmas. JM
  4. 4. Session We’ll explore 4 questions:  Why does your digital identity matter – as teachers?  How might your digital practices impact your students?  What makes the digital world so complex?  What are some strategies for thoughtful decision making? JM
  5. 5. your digital identity: a fragment  What did you share?  Why did you share it?  How did you share it?  What did you consider before hitting send? 5 minutes: Think, Pair, Share Your social networks:
  6. 6. Your digital identity JMImage licensed cc:by Maurizio Pesce on Flickr Stats from: Mary Meeker’s Internet Trends 2015 – Report: http://www.kpcb.com/internet-trends.  40% of mobile users on smartphones  73% of world’s population use mobile phones.
  7. 7. Why does it matter?  video at 4 billion views per day (mainly FB)  gaming growing 122% year over year  audio content growing 33% year over year (10 mill in last 2 years joined Soundcloud)  content & stories growing 140% year over year Excerpt from: Audrey Watters: What Educators Need to Know About Today’s Internet – EML June 2015 Stats from Mary Meeker’s Internet Report for 2015: http://www.kpcb.com/internet-trends Image licensed Cc:by:sa by Martin Abbegglen on Flickr
  8. 8. Why does it matter?  12-24 year olds generating content – 76% use camera to post to SM  Snapchat and Instagram replacing FB for social networking Stats from Mary Meeker’s Internet Report for 2015 http://www.kpcb.com/internet-trends Image licensed Cc:by:sa by Martin Abbegglen on Flickr
  9. 9. Why does it matter? The rise of the “ephemeralnet”… “Now of age, those young digital natives whose lives we cataloged without their consent are rebelling. They don’t want open social networks, they want intimacy. They don’t believe every action has to be meaningful and permanent. They imagine the web as deletable.” Excerpt from: Techcrunch.com: The Rise of the Ephemeralnet – June 2013. Image from: Weheartit - Anonymous
  10. 10. Why does it matter? “ What apps like these do is allow us a little bit more freedom to be ourselves, for better or worse.” From: Forbes – Why We Should Celebrate Snapchat and Encourage Ephemeral Communication (May, 2013)
  11. 11. Why does it matter? Instagram launched Snapchat rival – Bolt – in 2014. Until it hits Canada, your images can be seen and shared by anyone if your account is public. Just sayin…
  12. 12. Why does it matter to teachers? “Popular SNS have embedded beliefs about identity that are naïve and do not fully reflect the negotiated social participation that frame educators’ evolving Identities.” Excerpt from: Kimmons, R.; Veletsianos, G (in press) Teacher Professionalization in the Age of Social Networking Sites: Identifying Major Tensions and Dilemmas.
  13. 13. Considerations/negotiations Image source: http://www.ivanecoyote.com/page/6/bio Image licensed cc:by on Flickr
  14. 14. Why does it matter to teachers? “ The Supreme Court of Canada has determined that educators are held to a higher standard than other citizens due to their unique role in society.” From:www.bcteacherregulation
  15. 15. Group Discussion – Part 1 “ The Supreme Court of Canada has determined that educators are held to a higher standard than other citizens due to their unique role in society.” From:www.bcteacherregulation.ca
  16. 16. Group Discussion – Part 2 Go, no-go & shades of grey.  Join a pair: group brainstorm. Take note of your group’s thoughts on the following: Go Acceptable activity on social media Shades of Grey Not sure where this fits No-Go Un-acceptable activity on social media
  17. 17. Go: professional network From: Education Canada: Twitter and Canadian Educators From: educator George Couros’ Twitter timeline
  18. 18. No-Go: criticizing students Enough said?
  19. 19. No-Go: racism Winnipeg teacher, on leave after controversial Facebook posts on aboriginals. Excerpt from: CBC news Manitoba Posted: Dec 11, 2014
  20. 20. Shades of grey… “If teachers do not clearly understand how moral turpitude is defined in a given community, then how can they be sure that their behavior (online or offline) is beyond reproach?” Excerpt from: Kimmons, R.; Veletsianos, G (in press) Teacher Professionalization in the Age of Social Networking Sites: Identifying Major Tensions and Dilemmas.
  21. 21. Blurred Boundaries Do guidelines help? VSB drafts social media guidelines May, 2013 From Gwyneth Anne-Bronwynn on Flickr – CCbySA 2.0
  22. 22. Blurred boundaries  You’re on holiday in Mexico and friend posts and tags a photo of you on the beach with a drink and cigarette in hand.
  23. 23. Consider context Photo source: www.dailymail.co.uk
  24. 24. Consider context Photo source: Huffington Post
  25. 25. Blurred Boundaries  VSB Draft Social Media Policy (p. 2) "As role models for students and a representative of the School District, you must ensure that your use of social networking, even on your personal time, does not reflect negatively on your professional reputation or that of the School District.” From VSB Draft Social Media Policy
  26. 26. Blurred Boundaries  VSB Draft Social Media Policy (p. 3) “Ask friends not to tag you in any photos or videos without your permission and remove anything that is not appropriate to your role in the School District.” From VSB Draft Social Media Policy
  27. 27. Blurred Boundaries  You’ve had a terrible first week on your practicum and you post the following to a private group on FB: “Crazy advisor, entitled students, and mismanaged school. All in a days work. Anyone up for a drink?”
  28. 28. Blurred Boundaries: Students Image credit: Flickr user OldShoeWoman JM
  29. 29. Blurred Boundaries: Students CU
  30. 30. Blurred Boundaries  VSB Draft Social Media Policy (p. 2) “Social networking sites and online postings are not necessarily private. Never criticize students, other district employees or the School District on online sites.” From VSB Draft Social Media Policy CU
  31. 31. Blurred Boundaries  You’ve finished a great first week on your practicum and you receive a FB friend request from one of the students in your class.
  32. 32. Blurred Boundaries Excerpt from: The Daily Dot – Jan 9, 2015: Why Teachers Shouldn’t Be Friends With Their Students on Facebook
  33. 33. Blurred Boundaries  VSB Draft Social Media Policy (p. 2) “Do not request or accept any students or minor (person under the age of 19 years) as ‘friends’ on social networking sites or interact with students or minors on social networking sites for purposes not related to the delivery of the student’s educational program.” From VSB Draft Social Media Policy CU
  34. 34. Your digital tattoo: by others  Not online? Or are you?  Own your identity Source: http://mashable.com/2012/09/27/sikh-reddit-response/ CU
  35. 35. Complexity of Online Environment  Dynamics that influence what we do online – Anonymity – Persistence – Replicability – Searchability – Scalability From: boyd, danah. 2009. "Social Media is Here to Stay... Now What?" JM
  36. 36. The audience can be invisible and anonymous JM
  37. 37. Online Environment | Persistence what you (or others) put on the internet stays there The good The bad The ugly JM
  38. 38. Online Environment |Replicability Content can be taken out of context JM
  39. 39. Online Environment |Scalability Scalability: what’s intended for one reaches many JM
  40. 40. Online Environment | Searchability JM
  41. 41. Online Environment | Searchability JM
  42. 42. Strategies What employers look for… Excerpt from: Berkelaar, B. (2014) What Employers Want To See When They Google You. Brazencareerist.com CU
  43. 43. Strategies  Consider what you want out of life. “By acting online and offline in a way consistent with what you value, you simplify the work of impression management and increase the chances of finding a good professional match.” Excerpt from: Berkelaar, B. (2014) What Employers Want To See When They Google You. Brazencareerist.com
  44. 44. Strategies  Get advice and feedback. Ask friends what three words come to mind when they google you or look at your public profiles. “Use any feedback you get to evaluate your digital presence against the expectations set out for your profession.” Excerpt from: Berkelaar, B. (2014) What Employers Want To See When They Google You. Brazencareerist.com
  45. 45. Strategies  Curate accordingly. “having some information online is generally better than nothing. Manage privacy settings, check Google and Bing, update your profile photos and share your expertise in relevant online communities.” Excerpt from: Berkelaar, B. (2014) What Employers Want To See When They Google You. Brazencareerist.com
  46. 46. Strategies  Choose and manage digital relationships carefully. “We are known by the friends we keep online. If you haven’t done so, use LinkedIn to develop and maintain a network of relevant professional connections.” “Ask people with whom you’ve worked or volunteered whether they can offer you an endorsement.” Excerpt from: Berkelaar, B. (2014) What Employers Want To See When They Google You. Brazencareerist.com
  47. 47. Photo release policies  Become familiar with media release or photo release policies of your school district  It is important to remember your responsibilities as a teacher candidate include not adding to the digital tattoo of your students. JM Image credit: Flickr user OldShoeWoman
  48. 48. Facebook Guide for Educators Facebook for Educators and Community Leaders (2013): http://bit.ly/1MoldeC
  49. 49. Soundcloud: Ask A Teacher Series Panoply Media: Ask a Teacher Series: Episode 9: Friending Your Students
  50. 50. How did we do together? Consider what you’ve learned…  Why does your digital identity matter – as teachers?  How might your digital practices impact your students?  What makes the digital world so complex?  What are some strategies for thoughtful decision making? JM
  51. 51. Resources  BC College of Teachers: Standards, Questions and Case Studies http://www.bcct.ca/Standards/QuestionsCaseStudiesContents.aspx#  Berkelaar, B. (2014)What Employers Want To See When They Google You. Brazencareerist.com  boyd, danah. 2009. "Social Media is Here to Stay... Now What?" Microsoft Research Tech Fest, Redmond, Washington, February 26. Retrieved March 10, 2009: http://www.danah.org/papers/talks/MSRTechFest2009.html  Digital Tattoo: digitaltattoo.ubc.ca  Foresight Future Identities (2013) Final Project Report.The Government Office for Science, London.  Haberman,S. (2012) Sikh Woman Teaches Reddit a Lesson in Tolerance. Mashable.com  Vancouver School Board (May, 2013): Draft Policy and Regulations: Acceptable Use of Technology and Social Media Policy for Employees  Kimmons, R.; Veletsianos, G (in press) Teacher Professionalization in the Age of Social Networking Sites: Identifying Major Tensions and Dilemmas.  Meeker, Mary (2015). Internet Trends 2015: http://www.kpcb.com/internet-trends  Watters, Audrey (2015) What Educators Need to Know About Today’s Internet – EML June 2015
  52. 52. Connect with us… digitaltattoo.ubc.ca Twitter: DT@UBC Slideshare: Digital Tattoo http://www.slideshare.net/digitaltattoo/digital- tattoo-for-teacher-candidates-at-ubc JM

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