Google & Digital Learning Design

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The components introduced in digital learning design provides opportunities for teachers to construct a concept development framework that is multidisciplinary, student centered, and authentic to 21st Century skills. The digital learning design framework is based on research in both explicit instruction and constructivist learning. Using the digital design framework will help teachers pull together elements of college and career readiness standards, while constructing deep learning opportunities for students to perform.
Digital Learning Design serves as a “hub of innovation” that teachers can use to nurture learning skills, competencies, and habits of mind that provide students essential skills for tackling new and demanding cognitive challenges. Digital Learning Design is about teaching, learning, communicating, collaborating and creating.

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  • Welcome to Digital Learning Design and Google Applications
  • The components introduced in digital learning designprovides opportunities for teachers to construct a concept development framework that is multidisciplinary, student centered, and authentic to 21st Century skills. The digital learning designframework is based on research in both explicit instruction and constructivist learning. Using the digital design framework will help teachers pull together elements of college and career readiness standards, while constructing deep learning opportunities for students to perform. Digital Learning Design serves as a “hub of innovation” that teachers can use to nurture learning skills, competencies, and habits of mind that provide students essential skills for tackling new and demanding cognitive challenges. Digital Learning Design is about teaching, learning, communicating, collaborating and creating.
  • The digital learning design model provides explanation through the use of a concept design template. The concept design template is a guide to the development of an authentic culminating problem-based unit. These units are problem based in nature and take no longer than five hours to complete. The problem based units are designed specifically for facilitated instruction where teachers are harmonized to a relationship that uses rigor and relevance as a design map for purposeful learning . The key component of the model is to construct college and career standards that have been previously mastered into authentic real life tasks. These authentic task are designed to stimulate student thinking through an inquiry process while using 21st Century skills. http://www.thinglink.com/scene/308749202752536578
  • Today our digital design tools will consist of Google Apps for education. We will not provide you with evidence of the design model but will provide you with information on how Google application tools can fit within any instructional practice to enhance a students learning. Google has a long list of applications that are available to schools for free. Schools can establish their own Google Domain of application tools to allow students to safely experience the needed literacy skills to support 21st Century learning. Schools choose Google Applications for many reasons including the fact that it provides an excellent suite of productivity tools. Google Docs provides students and teachers with plethora of featured applications for teachers and students to learn 21st Century literacy through word processor, spreadsheet program, presentation tool, and more. In this section an introduction will be given on how to use Google applications as learning tools within the instructional design process.
  • If you do not have all of the infrastructure in place or budget to support software purchases schools should consider Google Apps as an option. Google has made a commitment to education and offers the entire Google Apps suite of services to schools for free, with no advertising, and with no strings attached. Large school districts who have investigated both Google Apps and Microsoft’s options discovered that to match the features offered in Google Apps (for free) found they would have to pay Microsoft over $200,000 per year, every year. Google Docs is not a watered-down, light version of Office programs. It provides a full featured word processor, spreadsheet program, presentation tool, and more.
  • Today we will explore various aspects of Digital Learning Design and how it relates to Digital Literacy and the applications that Google provides.
  • The new challenge for education is in information consumption as literacy is redefined through connected learning experiences and in ways that students access the vast warehouses of digital content. Education will need to face these challenges by redefining the process of web found knowledge into best practices on how to access, curate and create content that will enhance 21st Century learning skills. http://www.thinglink.com/scene/308478522920271873
  • This process is what defines digital literacy: the set of skills needed to collaboratively collect information from multiple sources, decipher and reduce shared information into segments of exactness, and reshape information into multimedia products that become new ideas with deeper meaning. Barbara R. Jones-Kavalier and Suzanne L. Flannigan: in an article post entitled Connecting the Digital Dots: Literacy of the 21st Century; defined digital literacy as; "A person's ability to perform tasks effectively in a digital environment ... Literacy includes the ability to read and interpret media, to reproduce data and images through digital manipulation, and to evaluate and apply new knowledge gained from digital environments."
  • The first incremental change is in knowing how, when, and where to locate useful information on the Internet. Accessing and sourcing Information is the ability to search for correct information; how to understand search engine results; how to make accurate inferences about information originating from a hyperlink and how to correctly source digital content.
  • Ten years ago, information accessing on the internet was a simple process of one line source request which resulted in a read only Web 1.0 results. The availability of information resources and search technologies is expanding rapidly, increasing the importance of effectively knowing how to access and reduce digital information into reliable forms of content extraction. This requires a new set of skills and strategies that are essential in accessing and successfully screening information. To demonstrate how Web 2.0 Internet information has changed in complexity from simple searches to a more complex form is illustrated in (Figure 2 Fragmentation of Information Sourcing.)3 Information now comes from scattered Web 2.0 sources from a community of contributors that requires sense making by an individual interpreter. Teaching students about information assimilation is about knowing how, when, and where to access information on the Internet, will grow to be an increasingly significant factor of digital media literacy.
  • Digital Information Fluency (DIF) is the ability to find, evaluate and use digital information effectively, efficiently and ethically. DIF involves knowing how digital information is different from print information; having the skills to use specialized tools for finding digital information; and developing the dispositions needed in the digital information environment. As teachers and librarians develop these skills and teach them to students, students will become better equipped to achieve their information needs.http://epubgeneration.weebly.com/uploads/5/5/8/8/5588196/activity_one.pdf
  • The Implications of Classroom Instruction and Open Source Networking Tools will have a major impact on classroom learning. The management skills required of today's educators and curriculum developers will include the ability to assess the importance of networking tools, and to develop methods that support the integration of these new instructional delivery formats within the given standards of the required curriculum.
  • We can define social networking as web-based Web 2.0 services that allow teachers and students to (1) construct a student profile within a circumscribed system, (2) inarticulate a list of other users with whom they collaborate ideas, and (3) view and collaborate a sources of information made by others within the networked environment. The nature and nomenclature of these collaborations may vary from the central purpose established by the networking site. Defining the central purpose for collaboration and social networking is key in digital learning design as social networking must not be a distracter to learning but a promotional avenue to share and deepen the learning process.
  • A way to introduce the ideas of accessing information that are built on content resourcing of social networks is to create a classroom backchannel. This will allow the students to participate in a virtual conversation while being facilitated by the classroom teacher. Backchannels that are asynchronous can be used for various classroom formal or informal discussions about current events, collaborative projects, readings, portfolios, and many other content specific activities generated by the teacher. The purpose behind the asynchronous backchannel is to provide immediate feedback or responses to learner. The teacher can also generate questions on the backchannel to support students in the construction of a project. Students can use the backchannel to describe their work to others; while other participants provide feedback or advice. Participation on the backchannel can help in the formation of a community among groups of learners who otherwise would be unable to communicate formally or informally.
  • A way to introduce the ideas of accessing information that are built on content resourcing of social networks is to create a classroom backchannel. This will allow the students to participate in a virtual conversation while being facilitated by the classroom teacher. Backchannels that are asynchronous can be used for various classroom formal or informal discussions about current events, collaborative projects, readings, portfolios, and many other content specific activities generated by the teacher. The purpose behind the asynchronous backchannel is to provide immediate feedback or responses to learner. The teacher can also generate questions on the backchannel to support students in the construction of a project. Students can use the backchannel to describe their work to others; while other participants provide feedback or advice. Participation on the backchannel can help in the formation of a community among groups of learners who otherwise would be unable to communicate formally or informally.
  • Writing and communicating ideas clearly through text is a fundamental skill that plays a critical role in every classroom. How can the process be improved with the use of Google Docs? Google applications can be used in an sundry of ways to provide both audio and video feedback on student writing. Google Docscan also be used as tools to create powerful reflections on a students own writing. Document sharing and comments provide students with opportunities to receive immediate feedback in the 24/7 classroom. Since Docs are stored online, students can work at school and at home from any computer with an Internet connection and they are more likely to revisit their work if they know someone else will be commenting on it.In the classroom, collaborative writing increases student participation, facilitates discussion of readings and enhances critical thinking (Chan, 1996). It and class work as well as that of their peers (Jacobsen and Mueller, 1998).Students learn to clearly express ideas through writing . Collaborative writing effectively teaches the concept of teamwork. Collaborative writing improves document quality by pooling the strengths of group members. At the same time, individual weaknesses are caught by the group and revised.Ultimately, collaboration can be a form of motivation for students as they become excited about working with a group as well as the prospect of learning from other students.Here some of the web tools to encourage and foster collaborative writing :http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/05/5-excellent-web-tools-to-teach.htmlhttps://docs.google.com/presentation/d/14mpGJZwUL-EqBvJvJoQltRlrqoFSMDWuMMe_xceHO1I/present#slide=id.i6https://chroniclevitae.com/news/389-the-best-new-google-docs-tools-for-teachers-and-studentshttp://web.uvic.ca/~sdoyle/E302/Notes/Peer%20editing.html
  • Google Docs, its web-based word-processing software. The updates include a new item in your menu bar, called Add-ons, that gives writers access to a wide selection of new, third-party tools. Several of these apps are specifically designed for writing and evaluating research work. – Google recently launched the Add-ons feature, which brings really useful Apps Script based extensions to Docs & Sheets. Add-ons are really easy to discover and install, and become available across all Docs & Sheets when they are installed. - See more at: http://blog.synergyse.com/2014/04/top-10-google-docs-sheets-add-ons-education.html#sthash.IbrpKbZX.dpufSee more at: https://chroniclevitae.com/news/389-the-best-new-google-docs-tools-for-teachers-and-students#sthash.FSIX9YkI.dpufhttp://googledrive.blogspot.com/2014/03/add-ons.htmlhttp://blog.synergyse.com/2014/04/top-10-google-docs-sheets-add-ons-education.html
  • Aggregation is the act of collecting content from multiple resources of information and then pulling information together into one information pool. In education aggregating information can help in topic selection as the aggregation tools seeks out topics lessening the one line search results. Social network aggregation is the process of collecting content from multiple social network services. The task is often performed by a social network  aggregator, which pulls together information into a single location, or helps a user consolidate multiple social networking profiles into one profile. 
  • I am sold on a workflow solution that includes having students turn in their work using a Google form. This is because I can ask specific questions and use those questions to encourage deep and purposeful reflection – and forms can provide me with a link to their work. This makes finding all student work easy without having to look through numerous different locations.
  • Google forms is known for its setup to collect data. As educators we are expanding the Google Forms capability to include it as an assessment tool. Google Forms can be embedded into a webpage or the link can be shared with students to access the assessment. When creating the form you can choose questions that allow for students to provide a short answer, long explanation, a multiple choice question or a combination of any of the question styles. As you write your questions it is reccommended that you make the first question asking for the student's name and checking the box mandatory. If the questions are marked mandatory the student will not be able to submit the form until all questions have been addressed. Once you have shared the form responses are collected in a spreadsheet you can access in your Google Account.http://www.teachthought.com/technology/80-interesting-ways-to-use-google-forms-in-the-classroom/https://sites.google.com/site/mydigitalfootprint//innovative-ideas-for-using-google-forms
  • A Hangout is a web-based tool created by Google for communicating through video. Up to ten people can "hang out" at one time in a virtual "room." A Hangout can be as simple or as complex as needed for the task at hand. It can be used simply to converse or, through the use of extra apps and add-ons that Google provides, a Hangout can become a robust, virtual meeting space.http://www.edutopia.org/blog/educators-schools-google-hangouts-mary-beth-hertz
  • Digital curation is a process of establishing and developing long term repositories of digital assets. These are the same assets that are now being used by researchers, scientists, historians, writers and scholars.. These are the research skills found to be important for today's student that are spelled out within the components of digital literacy. To help students function in a society where information access is growing out of proportion is to teach students about how to use curation tools. This is a new skill that needs to be developed. It is a digital literacy skill that will help students to research appraise and manage digital information into sustained compilations. The teaching of curation tools will improve a student's ability to access quality of information as it coincides with selecting, and sharing the best and most relevant digital information.
  • ProcessA process portfolio is simple. Students create a product and then later reflect on the process by answering some thought-provoking questions. The important part here is getting the students to think about their learning. This is often an important step that gets overlooked as teachers move quickly from one lesson to another. This allows kids the time to reflect, to ask more questions, or to do additional research.ShowcaseThis type of portfolio seeks to highlight the students’ best work. Here is where they publish the work they are most proud of and/or the work that has become important to them. Showcased work will allow students to populate their digital footprint, create a longitudinal learning inventory, and show growth over time. This is a powerful experience for students and can really increase student self-esteem and pride in their work.HybridThis is a combo of the two portfolios above and my favorite of the three. The hybrid model allows kids to reflect on their learning and then additionally choose those pieces that they value and that show the most growth. It is through this hybrid model that students take work from a previous year and expand on it in subsequent years. This encourages students to work on a project over time or expand on a writing assignment as their skills improve.http://www.edudemic.com/digital-portfolios/
  • Digitalportfolios are important, andthe power of Google tools can help students curate and showcase and own their learning.A portfolio is a goal-driven, organized collection of artifacts and reflections that demonstrate a growth or expansion of knowledge and skills over time. The content, organization and presentation of materials in portfolios can vary greatly depending on the purpose and intended audience of the portfolio. An essential element of a portfolio is to show evidence of an individual’s growth and development.A portfolio is a purposeful collection of student work that tells the story of a student's personal self and a student's achievement. Portfolios may demonstrate a wide range of student work. Students control the selection of portfolio content and material. Unlike standardized tests portfolios are direct indicators of a student's learning experiences.Portfolios allow teachers and parents to share a real display of a student's performance without interpretation of test scores. Portfolios provide a natural medium for teacher-pupil discussions and the customization of individual learning experiences and goals. Comprehensive portfolios, maintained over a period of time, can exhibit comparisons of student work and illustrations of growthWhat are Digital Portfolios?Digital portfolios, sometimes referred to as multimedia portfolios, electronic portfolios, e-folios and web folios contain much of the content traditional portfolios include but present these materials in digital format.Materials, also called artifacts, are presented using a combination of multimedia technologies such as audio recordings, database, spreadsheet, video and others.Digital portfolios are a way of showcasing student achievement through class assignments, community service, and occupational experience.Basically, a digital portfolio means that students can save their work to a disk, a CD, or a web page.
  • students create evidence and artifacts of their own learning through the process of aggregation and curation
  • Most of us in education are looking for a new resolve for fostering the development of creative problem solving within our schools and classrooms. Some of the motivation behind this quest for developing new instructional methods of helping students seek ways to solve problems is driven by the mass amounts of available information. Students today have to learn how to access, sort, decipher, and curate information that is being produced at a phenomenal rate.  Not only is information at its highest level at any point in mankind's existence, it is surmountable to ever grasp the connections needed to find the origins of a single idea. What becomes even more prevalent in this quest is that their seems to be a thought that there are a limited number of students who are graduating from our schools who know how to  creatively solve problems. When a teacher thinks about thinking they are redesigning their mastery objective by using higher levels of complexity. They are thinking about the cognitive development of their students. They are thinking about how they can apply rigor within their mastery objectives using statements that stretch the learning curve at the correct level of complexity. A thinking objective usually is transformed from a mastery objective to a performance objective when using higher levels of cognitive reasoning, especially when applied at DOK levels 3 and 4. The thinking objective includes prerequisite observable skill sets of mastery but expands the application of knowledge as it aims to develop a particular thinking skills.
  • using creation as formative and summative assessment.
  • The learner-centered classroom places the student at the center of knowledge obtainment. Students are linked to the process in engaged activities as they are asked to perform authentic task. These are the instructional strategies that include being able to activate the learning process without influencing student choices. To  work along side of the student and being able to oversee the growth and development of students, the teacher and the students become a partner in the learning process. Authentic performance assessmentspractically shifts direct instructional practices to providing students with more control over their own learning. Giving students a greater sense of their own responsibility for their learning becomes learning accountability.  clarifying learning goals providing the student with control of his or her learninghttp://www.thinglink.com/scene/324288090266927104
  • Simply defined, “deeper learning” is the “process of learning for transfer,” meaning it allows a student to take what’s learned in one situation and apply it to another, explained James Pellegrino, one of the authors of the report. “You can use knowledge in ways that make it useful in new situations,” he said in a recent webinar. “You have procedural knowledge of how, why, and when to apply it to answer questions and solve problems.”http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2012/09/how-do-we-define-and-measure-deeper-learning/
  • http://epubgeneration.weebly.com/The Connected Learning website initially opened on June of 2012, for the purpose of conducting and archiving research for the development of a 21st Century model for education. The central purpose of the website is to provide a guide for teaching of digital literacy in a connected learning environment. The website supports ideas of student centered facilitated instruction, that provides for the creation of content through project, problem based learning applications.
  • Mike King is the recipient of the 2012 Digital Principal Award sponsored by the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP). The award was created to 'honor principals who exhibit bold, creative leadership in their drive to harness the potential of new technologies to further learning goals.' The role of the educator, King believes, is to facilitate that process and help students use digital tools responsibly. King is a prolific author, most recently focusing on the flipped classroom and the textbook of the future. To learn more about Mike you can review his Digital Portfolio  where you will find links to his presentations, productions and publications.http://mikekinglinks.weebly.com/
  • Google & Digital Learning Design

    1. 1. D E S I G DIGITAL LEARNING GOOGLE APPLICATIONS
    2. 2. DIGITAL LEARNING DESIGN IS THE USE OF DIGITAL TOOLS WITHIN THE INSTRUCTIONAL PROCESS TO ENHANCE LEARNING THROUGH A CONTINUAL DEVELOPMENT OF LITERACY SKILLS D. L. D. DEFINED
    3. 3. DIGITAL LEARNING DESIGN INCLUDES  Explicit Instruction  Project Based Learning  Problem Based Learning  Individualized Student Centered Learning  Authentic Instruction and Assessment (AIW)  Blended Learning
    4. 4. GOOGLE APPS FOR EDUCATION  Google Documents - a word processing program (similar to Microsoft Word)  Google Presentations - a multimedia presentation program (similar to Microsoft PowerPoint)  Google Spreadsheets - a spreadsheet program (similar to Microsoft Excel)  Google Forms - a program for creating and delivering online forms, surveys, quizzes, and more  Google Drawings - a drawing and graphics program
    5. 5. Why Google Docs?  Free (Includes e-mail)  Constantly adding new features  Removes compatibility issues  Allows for anytime, anywhere access  Allows for collaboration and sharing  Compatible with dropbox and other file storage applications
    6. 6. D L D & GOOGLE APPLICATIONS
    7. 7. INFORMATION ACCESSING COLLABORATION AGGREGATION CURATION DIGITAL MEDIA IMAGE DESIGN AUDIO MIXING DOCUMENTS ANIMATION
    8. 8. Literacy includes the ability to read and interpret media, to reproduce data and images through digital manipulation, and to evaluate and apply new knowledge gained from digital environments." "A person's ability to perform tasks effectively in a digital environment ...
    9. 9. ACCESSING AND SOURCING INFORMATION IS THE ABILITY TO SEARCH FOR CORRECT INFORMATION; HOW TO FIGURE OUT SEARCH ENGINE RESULTS; HOW TO MAKE ACCURATE INFERENCES ABOUT INFORMATION ORIGINATING FROM A HYPERLINK AND HOW TO CORRECTLY SOURCE DIGITAL CONTENT. INFORMATION ACCESSING
    10. 10. INFORMATION IS FRAGMENTED
    11. 11. INFORMATION FLUENCY  involves knowing how digital information is different from print information  having the skills to use specialized tools for finding digital information
    12. 12. NEW SKILLS ARE REQUIRED  Knowing how, when, and where to access information on the Internet will grow to be an increasingly significant factor of digital literacy.  The availability of information resources and search technologies is expanding rapidly increasing the importance of effectively knowing how to access and reduce digital information into reliable forms of content extraction.
    13. 13. INFORMATION ACCESSING “ “ Similar WordsExcluded Words Exact Phrases Multiple Words OR ~ Numerical Ranges . . . . define: site: link: 1 + 1 cm in foot
    14. 14. THE PARTICIPATORY CULTURES THAT ARE AFFECTED TO A LARGE EXTENT BY THE TYPE OF PERSONAL LEARNING SPACES THAT PROVIDE A DEGREE OF INFORMAL MENTORSHIP THROUGH THE CREATION AND SHARING OF WORK WITH OTHERS. COLLABORATION
    15. 15. NEW SKILLS ARE REQUIRED  Safely construct a student profile within a circumscribed system  Safely inarticulate a list of other users with whom they collaborate ideas,  Safely view and collaborate a sources of information made by others within the networked environment  Understand the importance of citation work online and plagiarism
    16. 16. ASYNCHRONOUS BACKCHANNEL  create a classroom backchannel  formal or informal discussions  support students in the construction of a project  formation of a community among groups  students participate in a virtual conversation
    17. 17. GOOGLE MODERATOR Google Moderator allows you to create a series about anything that you are interested in discussing and open it up for people to submit questions, ideas, or suggestions.
    18. 18. GOOGLE DOCS & COLLABORATION  encourages students to continually assess their own performance  improves document quality by pooling the strengths of group members  collaborative writing increases student participation Peer Editing Guidelines
    19. 19. GOOGLE DOCS ADD-ONS
    20. 20. AGGREGATION IS THE ACT OF COLLECTING CONTENT FROM MULTIPLE RESOURCES OF INFORMATION AND THEN PULLING INFORMATION TOGETHER INTO ONE INFORMATION POOL. AGGREGATION
    21. 21. GOOGLE AGGREGATION TOOLS
    22. 22. AGGREGATION WITH Create Checklists Create Surveys Collect Data Graph Results Design Questionnaires Map Connections Google Forms
    23. 23. GOOGLE HANGOUTS  Connecting with Mentors  Google Hangouts can make learning more engaging and personalized for students  Hangouts can aid in connecting people without the need for travel.  great way for students to engage in connected learning (4) experiences with their peers  record Hangout discussions as a resource for other students
    24. 24. DIGITAL CURATION IS A PROCESS OF ESTABLISHING AND DEVELOPING LONG TERM REPOSITORIES OF DIGITAL ASSETS. CURATION
    25. 25. THREE TYPES OF PORTFOLIOS PROCESS • Students create a product • reflect on the process SHOWCASE • Students’ best work • longitudinal learning inventory HYBRID • Students reflect on their learning • choose those pieces that they value think about their learning expand work from previous year publish selected work through reflection
    26. 26. GOOGLE DIGITAL PORTFOLIO TOOLS
    27. 27. ABILITY TO PRODUCE SOMETHING NEW THROUGH IMAGINATIVE SKILL, WHETHER A NEW SOLUTION TO A PROBLEM, A NEW METHOD OR DEVICE, OR A NEW ARTISTIC OBJECT OR FORM. CREATION
    28. 28. THE ULTIMATE EVIDENCE OF LEARNING IS CREATION
    29. 29. ACTIVATORS OF LEARNING
    30. 30. DIGITAL MEDIA CREATION TEAMS IMAGES AUDIO MIXING DOCUMENTS ANIMATION
    31. 31. DIGITAL DESIGN RESOURCES http://epubgeneration.weebly.com/
    32. 32. @digitalsandbox1 Classrooms WALLS without

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