Persuasive writing

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Persuasive writing

  1. 1. Persuasive Writing<br />W.GN.O6.O2<br />
  2. 2. The Art of Persuasion<br />Free Credit Report.Com Commericals<br />
  3. 3. You’re Already an Expert!<br />“I got good grades, so I should get a bigger allowance.”<br />“If you buy me a computer, it’ll be easier to do my homework!”<br />“But everyone else is doing it!”<br />
  4. 4. Step 1: Think of a Problem<br />What do you care about?<br />What is your goal?<br />Who is your audience?<br />Is there enough support?<br />
  5. 5. Step 2: Do Your Research!<br />Use Credible Sources<br />There’s more than just the internet!<br />More information = More convincing<br />Consider the Counterargument<br />
  6. 6. What the Heck is a Counterargument?<br />Opinions of people that may disagree with your point of view<br />Think about…<br />Why?<br />What evidence do they have?<br />How can you change their minds?<br />
  7. 7. Step 3: Get Organized<br />
  8. 8. Step 4: Introduction<br />Introduce your topic<br />State how you feel<br />Save evidence for body paragraphs<br />Hook your audience!<br />
  9. 9. Summer: 15 Days or 2 1/2 Months?<br /> The final bell rings. It’s the last day of school, and summer has finally come! Students don’t have to think about school for at least another 2 1/2 months. That is the way it should always be. Schools should continue using the traditional calendar and not a year-round schedule. There are numerous downsides to year-round schooling. It has no positive effects on education, it adds to costs, and it disrupts the long-awaited summer vacation.<br />
  10. 10. Step 5: Body Paragraphs<br />It’s you’re time to shine!<br />Keep information organized<br />“I believe ________ because ________.”<br />1 argument = 1 paragraph<br />
  11. 11. “Like any other facility, keeping a school open requires a great deal of money. When a school changes to a year-round schedule, the costs skyrocket. Keeping school open in the middle of summer requires air conditioning, and that adds significantly to the school’s expenses. The usual utility bills grow because of the additional open-school time.”<br />
  12. 12. Things to Remember!<br />Keep arguments strong<br />Relevance – Does it make sense?<br />Be likeable<br />Remember who you are talking to<br />
  13. 13. What About That Counterargument Thing?<br />Include in separate paragraph.<br />“Others may feel _______ because ________.”<br />“Contrary to the well-accepted belief, year-round schooling has no constructive impact on education.”<br />
  14. 14. Make a Comeback!<br />Prove why your opinion is better!<br />Choice words such as “but”, “however”<br />Support with facts<br />
  15. 15. “However, many schools that change to year-round schedules end up switching back. For example, since 1980, 95 percent of schools that tried the year-round schedule changed back to a traditional calendar.” <br />
  16. 16. Step 6: Conclusion<br />End strong<br />Restate your opinion<br />How can the issue be improved?<br />
  17. 17. “It is evident that year-round schooling is not the best option for the school calendar. There is absolutely nothing wrong with the traditional school year. Why change something that works so well? The final bell rings. Let’s make sure this bell means that the “real” summer vacation has come.”<br />
  18. 18. Works Cited<br />The Trial, Write, August 24, 2007 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution<br />Sydney White, Television, September 7, 2009 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution<br />http://www.freecreditcreport.com<br />Gina Mae, My Personal Sun, February 19, 2011 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution<br />Photolove, Many Questions, August 11, 2007 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution<br />http://www.timeforkids.com/TFK<br />Tracey, Stars, November 16, 2008 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution<br />Dustin Diaz, Day One Hundred and Twenty Nine, May 9, 2009 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution<br />

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