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The Rock Cycle<br />Crystal Quartz<br />Sedimentary Rock<br />
The Rock Cycle<br />Three Types of Rock<br />Cooling<br />Igneous<br />Magma/ Lava<br />Heat/ Pressure<br />Erosion/ Lithi...
Igneous Rock<br />Formed two ways<br />Underground  Intrusive (or Plutonic)<br />Cooling magma chambers<br />Above ground...
Igneous Rock<br />Cooling Rates<br />Rapid cooling<br />Fine texture<br />No visible crystals<br />Sometimes glassy<br />S...
Igneous Rock<br />Mafic Rock<br />Rich in magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe)<br />Felsic Rock<br />Rich in feldspar and silica (...
Activity<br />Were they cooled rapidly or slowly?<br />
Metamorphic Rock<br />Formed from Igneous and Sedimentary rock<br />Changed by underground conditions (metamorphosed)<br /...
Metamorphic Rock<br />Regional Metamorphism<br />Large-scale <br />Heat and pressure work together<br />5- 40 km undergrou...
Metamorphic Rock<br />Foliated-<br />Orientation of minerals is perpendicular to direction of pressure.<br />Non-foliated-...
Sedimentary Rock<br />Formed from sediment<br />Sediment- sand, pebbles, mud, dust…<br />How is sediment created?<br />Ero...
Sedimentary Rock<br />Lithification- <br />loose sediment is collected and hardened into rock<br />Compaction <br />Recryt...
Sedimentary Rock<br />Form in beds of sediment deposition<br />Caused by currents, waves, drying conditions<br />Ripple ma...
Activity<br />What type of rock is it?<br />
Activity<br />What type of rock is it?<br />
The Rock Cycle<br />
Photo Sources <br />Mike Beauregard, “Stripes”, June 2010 via flickr, Creative Commons Attribution.<br />Brenda Clark, “Cr...
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The rock cycle

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The rock cycle

  1. 1. The Rock Cycle<br />Crystal Quartz<br />Sedimentary Rock<br />
  2. 2. The Rock Cycle<br />Three Types of Rock<br />Cooling<br />Igneous<br />Magma/ Lava<br />Heat/ Pressure<br />Erosion/ Lithification<br />Erosion/ Lithification<br />Metamorphic<br />Sedimentary<br />Heat/ Pressure<br />
  3. 3. Igneous Rock<br />Formed two ways<br />Underground  Intrusive (or Plutonic)<br />Cooling magma chambers<br />Above ground Extrusive (or Volcanic)<br />Cooling lava<br />
  4. 4. Igneous Rock<br />Cooling Rates<br />Rapid cooling<br />Fine texture<br />No visible crystals<br />Sometimes glassy<br />Sometimes full of air pockets<br />Slow cooling<br />Coarse texture<br />Large crystalsvisible<br />
  5. 5. Igneous Rock<br />Mafic Rock<br />Rich in magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe)<br />Felsic Rock<br />Rich in feldspar and silica (quartz)<br />
  6. 6. Activity<br />Were they cooled rapidly or slowly?<br />
  7. 7. Metamorphic Rock<br />Formed from Igneous and Sedimentary rock<br />Changed by underground conditions (metamorphosed)<br />Heat, pressure, and strain<br />
  8. 8. Metamorphic Rock<br />Regional Metamorphism<br />Large-scale <br />Heat and pressure work together<br />5- 40 km underground<br />Contact Metamorphism<br />Lava or magma in contact with rock<br />Dynamic Metamorphism<br />Pressure along fault zones<br />Mylonites<br />
  9. 9. Metamorphic Rock<br />Foliated-<br />Orientation of minerals is perpendicular to direction of pressure.<br />Non-foliated-<br /> No preferred <br /> orientation.<br />
  10. 10. Sedimentary Rock<br />Formed from sediment<br />Sediment- sand, pebbles, mud, dust…<br />How is sediment created?<br />Erosion- weathering of rock causes material to break off<br />
  11. 11. Sedimentary Rock<br />Lithification- <br />loose sediment is collected and hardened into rock<br />Compaction <br />Recrytallization<br />Cementation<br />
  12. 12. Sedimentary Rock<br />Form in beds of sediment deposition<br />Caused by currents, waves, drying conditions<br />Ripple marks, mud cracks…<br />
  13. 13. Activity<br />What type of rock is it?<br />
  14. 14. Activity<br />What type of rock is it?<br />
  15. 15. The Rock Cycle<br />
  16. 16. Photo Sources <br />Mike Beauregard, “Stripes”, June 2010 via flickr, Creative Commons Attribution.<br />Brenda Clark, “Crystal 1”, April 28,2009 via flickr, Creative Commons Attribution.<br />Tourist_on_earth, “Amethyst”, June 21, 2008 via flickr, Creative Commons Attribution.<br />Kevin Walsh, “Obsidian”, August 14, 2007 via flickr, Creative Commoms Attribution.<br />SiimSepp, “Gniess”, April 20, 2005 via wikimedia, Creative Commons Attribution.<br />ZeWrestler, “Conglomerate Rock”, October 4, 2009 via wikimedia, Creative Commons Attirbution.<br />Burkina Faso, “Dry Lake”, January 2008 via wikimedia, Creative Commons Attribution.<br />Benjamint444, “Pumice Stone”, September 2010 via wikimedia, Creative Commons Attribution.<br />Peter Bockstaller, “Breccia”, 2007 via wikimedia, Creative Commons Attribution.<br />

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