Note: This presentation does not have an audio
component—all necessary information is included on
the slides.
 11.5 to 12 million undocumented immigrants
lived in the U.S.
• 2/3 of that population had been living in the
U.S for 10 ...
• Myth: Undocumented immigrants come to the U.S. to get welfare
 Facts:
 Most come exclusively to work
 90% worked, a h...
• Myth: Most children of the undocumented are
“unauthorized”
 Fact: 2/3 of children with undocumented parents are U.S.
ci...
 Definition: Refugee, person who has fled or been
expelled from his or her country of origin because of
natural catastrop...
Live in a place where people are persecuted because of their race, religion, ethnic
affiliation, social group, or politica...
United States 41,300
Australia 13,400
Canada 10,700
Sweden 2,400
Norway 1,000
New Zealand 700
 The US averages 40,000 to 50,000 refugees each year.
 Texas became home to almost 4,000 last year.
 Dallas gained over...
 Refugees have all the same rights as U.S.
citizens except that they are unable to vote or
hold public office. They must ...
All refugees entering the U.S. go through a
resettlement agency
Resettlement agencies pick up the refugee
from the airpo...
 Unfavorable living
conditions such as
living with relatives
 Refugees often have
to move from place to
place
 Refugee ...
 Numerous languages, not all adequately represented
• Many services only translate three to five languages.
 Daily tasks...
 The majority of
refugee students have
never been in a formal
classroom
• Lacking basic skills
• Non-English speaking
• R...
Access to Healthcare
• Financial
• Transportation
• Communication
Hostility from host community
Distrust of Medical pro...
 Mental Health Issues
• Mental Health
problems comprise the
main health issue s
which refugees face
• Anxiety, depression...
www.refugee.org
www.churchworldservice.org
www.lirs.org
www.state.gov
www.irc.org
www.unhcr.org
www.cal.org
Immigrants & refugees
Immigrants & refugees
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Immigrants & refugees

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Immigrants & refugees

  1. 1. Note: This presentation does not have an audio component—all necessary information is included on the slides.
  2. 2.  11.5 to 12 million undocumented immigrants lived in the U.S. • 2/3 of that population had been living in the U.S for 10 years or less.  The majority of “new arrivals” are young, have few years of schooling, and speak little English.  Most are employed in low paying jobs requiring very little skill.  Almost two-thirds of the undocumented population lives in just six states: California (26 %), Texas (12 %), Florida (10 %) New York (8 %), Illinois (4 %), and New Jersey (4 %)
  3. 3. • Myth: Undocumented immigrants come to the U.S. to get welfare  Facts:  Most come exclusively to work  90% worked, a higher rate than U.S. citizens and legal immigrants!  Are ineligible for welfare, food stamps, and Medicaid • Myth: Undocumented immigrants all crossed the Mexican border  Facts:  60-75% of 10 million undocumented immigrants crossed the Mexican border illegally and w/o inspection  25-40% entered legally and either overstayed visas or violated terms of their admission • Myth: Undocumented immigrants are all single men  Facts:  40% of the adults are women  54% of men live “in married couples or other families”  Less than ½ are single and unattached
  4. 4. • Myth: Most children of the undocumented are “unauthorized”  Fact: 2/3 of children with undocumented parents are U.S. citizens who live in mixed-status families • Myth: A large number of school children are undocumented  Fact: In 2000, 1.5% of elementary, and 3% of secondary children were undocumented • Myth: Undocumented immigrants do not pay taxes  Fact: Social Security Administration estimates that ¾ of undocumented immigrants pay payroll taxes and contribute $6-7 billion in Social Security that they will be unable to claim.
  5. 5.  Definition: Refugee, person who has fled or been expelled from his or her country of origin because of natural catastrophe, war or military occupation, or fear of religious, racial, or political persecution.
  6. 6. Live in a place where people are persecuted because of their race, religion, ethnic affiliation, social group, or political belief. Belong to one of these groups. Flee your country when your life is threatened. Take only your immediate family members and the clothes you are wearing. Find your way to the relative safety of a neighboring country. Apply to the UNHCR, United Nations High Commission for refugees, for protection. If the UN recognizes your need for protection, you may be given a card and allowed to live in a refugee camp. You may not even be safe there as these often isn’t security within the camp. You probably aren’t allowed to work in the asylum country and are therefore dependent on the UN and NGOs to provide food, medical care and education.
  7. 7. United States 41,300 Australia 13,400 Canada 10,700 Sweden 2,400 Norway 1,000 New Zealand 700
  8. 8.  The US averages 40,000 to 50,000 refugees each year.  Texas became home to almost 4,000 last year.  Dallas gained over 1,200 refugees last year.  The top five groups originated from Somalia, Cuba, Sudan, Myanmar, and Vietnam.
  9. 9.  Refugees have all the same rights as U.S. citizens except that they are unable to vote or hold public office. They must adhere to all the same laws as U.S. citizens.  Refugees arrive with I-94 cards, this serves as their proof of residency and their birth certificate.  1 year after arrival to the U.S. the refugee can apply for a green card, usually with the assistance of their resettlement agency.  5 years from their date of arrival refugee may apply for citizenship. They must pass a written and oral test.
  10. 10. All refugees entering the U.S. go through a resettlement agency Resettlement agencies pick up the refugee from the airport and arrange for their basic needs to be met, housing, food, medical and clothing. Basic role of a resettlement agency is to get the refugee client self sufficient within 90 to 180 days.
  11. 11.  Unfavorable living conditions such as living with relatives  Refugees often have to move from place to place  Refugee Services in Dallas Texas
  12. 12.  Numerous languages, not all adequately represented • Many services only translate three to five languages.  Daily tasks impeded • Doctor visits • Grocery store outings • Needing bus information or being lost • Helping children with school  Use of family/friends is the primary source of information • The longest residence become the greatest source. • Can lead to misinformation  Word of mouth is also utilized • Oral cultures, need factual information within the communities
  13. 13.  The majority of refugee students have never been in a formal classroom • Lacking basic skills • Non-English speaking • Reading, writing, math • Attention span  Refugee Parental Involvement • Parents are not used to being involved in the school system • Children often begin speaking English before their parents which can create stress • Language barriers keep parents from being involved
  14. 14. Access to Healthcare • Financial • Transportation • Communication Hostility from host community Distrust of Medical providers Differing cultural Understanding of illness and health care systems
  15. 15.  Mental Health Issues • Mental Health problems comprise the main health issue s which refugees face • Anxiety, depression, po st traumatic stress disorder • Torture trauma • Life events
  16. 16. www.refugee.org www.churchworldservice.org www.lirs.org www.state.gov www.irc.org www.unhcr.org www.cal.org

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