Ableism

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  • Actually, we autistics prefer to be called autistic. Autism isn't something we HAVE, it's something we ARE. It's literally part of our DNA. I suggest checking out the tag #actuallyautistic. :)
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  • These portrayals elicit unwanted sympathy, or worse, pity toward individuals with disabilities. Respect and acceptance is what people with disabilities would rather have.
  • This implies that it is unusual for people with disabilities to have talents or skills.
  • It is better to say "people without disabilities" or "typical," if necessary to make comparisons.
  • Ableism

    1. 1. Week 8<br />Ableism<br />
    2. 2. Ableism<br />stereotyping , negative attitudes, and discrimination toward people based on a physical or mental disability resulting in discrimination and/or prejudice<br />
    3. 3. Medical Model<br />
    4. 4. Medical Model of Disability<br />The 'medical model' sees the disabled person as the problem. <br />Usually the focus is on the person’s impairment rather than the needs of the person. <br /> <br />Cycle of dependency and exclusion is inevitable<br />
    5. 5. Social Model<br />
    6. 6. Social Model of Disability<br />The position of people who are disabled and the discrimination against them are socially created<br />fear, ignorance and prejudice create barriers and discriminatory practices that are the only true “disabilities”<br />institutional discrimination toward people who are disabled is as fundamental to our society as sexism, racism or heterosexism<br />
    7. 7. Guidelines for Reducing Ableism<br />Do not refer to a person's disability unless it is relevant. <br />Avoid referring to people with disabilities as "the disabled, the blind, the epileptics, the retarded, a quadriplegic," etc. Descriptive terms should be used as adjectives, not as nouns. <br />
    8. 8. Use "disability" rather than "handicap" to refer to a person's disability<br />Never use "cripple/crippled" in any reference of disability <br />
    9. 9. When referring to a person's disability, try to use "people first" language. In other words, it is better to say "person with a disability" or "man who has autism" rather than "a disabled person" or "an autistic man," particularly in a first reference. <br />
    10. 10. Avoid referring to people with disabilities as "the disabled, the blind, the epileptics, the retarded, a quadriplegic," etc. Descriptive terms should be used as adjectives, not as nouns. <br />
    11. 11. Avoid negative or sensational descriptions of a person's disability. Don't say "suffers from," "a victim of," or "afflicted with." <br />Don't refer to people with disabilities as "patients" unless they are receiving treatment in a medical facility. <br />Never say "invalid.”<br />These portrayals elicit unwanted sympathy, or worse, pity toward individuals with disabilities. Respect and acceptance is what people with disabilities would rather have. <br />
    12. 12. Don't portray people with disabilities as overly courageous, brave, special, or superhuman; this implies that it is unusual for people with disabilities to have talents or skills.<br />
    13. 13. Don't use "normal" to describe people who don't have disabilities; it is better to say “people with disabilities” or “typical” if it is necessary to make comparisons.<br />
    14. 14. Never say "wheelchair-bound" or "confined to a wheelchair." People who use mobility or adaptive equipment are, if anything, afforded freedom and access that otherwise would be denied them. <br />
    15. 15. Never assume that a person with a communication disorder (speech impediment, hearing loss, motor impairment) also has a cognitive disability, such as mental retardation. On the other hand, people with mental retardation often speak well. <br />

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