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NEW DELHI

WHITE PAPER

MUMBAI

NEW YORK
INTRODUCTION

Nayi Disha builds movement based learning modules for kindergarten children that require them to jump,  hop
...
IESEARCH FOUNDATION

Every child has a distinctive learning style.  While the current education system only caters to visu...
Our modules are based on the following theories that throw light on the need to cater to the different learning
styles,  i...
LEARNING STYLES THEORY

Apart from using different intelligences,  children also have a preferred learning style that they...
FLOw THEORY

Flow theory provides a unique paradigm for studying engagement in educational video games as it takes into
ac...
MOVEMENT BASED CLASSROOM LEARNING

Along with catering to the challenging needs of a kinesthetic learner,  we also advocat...
IAYI DISHA :  A COMPREHENSIVE EDUCATIONAL TOOL

Our modules benefit both,  the learner and the teacher effectively.  The t...
"Young kids have diflrerent learning styles,  some learn
by looking,  some by listening and many others by
moving,  this mo...
OUR PARTNER SCHOOLS

OUR REACH

Mumbai
Bengaluru
Chennai
Ahmedabad
Nagpur
Pune
Hassan
Daman

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
Loud...
WORLD FORUM ON EARLY LEARNING AND CARE

Nayi Disha and Kaju were honored To be a part of The World Forum on Early Learning...
// D
‘ ’/ .

Write To us at
f ,  homework (at) nayidishastudios (dot) com i

J / nayidishostudio E] / nayidishastudios

 
...
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Nayi Disha_White Paper

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Nayi Disha_White Paper

  1. 1. NEW DELHI WHITE PAPER MUMBAI NEW YORK
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION Nayi Disha builds movement based learning modules for kindergarten children that require them to jump, hop and clap while they learn concepts from their curriculum. We utilize motion sensors to detect a child's body so that he/ she is able to physically interact with virtual content. We facilitate kinesthetic learning in classrooms with the help of stories featuring the kid's lovable friend, Kajul NAYII *: :;III>IsHA
  3. 3. IESEARCH FOUNDATION Every child has a distinctive learning style. While the current education system only caters to visual and auditory learners, approximately 45% of the students in a typical classroom are kinesthetic learners. (Tranquillo, 2008) (See Fig. I) Kinesthetic learners understand concepts and ideas better when they are performing an action. Unfortunately, kinesthetic learners are often deemed as mischievous, restless and disruptive with the present system disregarding their needs. Moreover, movement based learning, as a concept is almost absent in the present day classroom, in spite of its proven benefit. § Kinesthetic Learners 45% I7 I K. Visual Learners 30°/ o Auditory Learners 25% I T Fig.1 NAYI "i-QJDISHA
  4. 4. Our modules are based on the following theories that throw light on the need to cater to the different learning styles, intelligences; and the benefits of movement based learning. ' T’ {f ‘ ’ II T’ I" ‘ A ' , / , .. mumiunia , ‘ , LEARNING ' p ‘ maiugmuaiui-; m,= u, I ' ‘ lL‘Il_: II, II, l[tl3ImI_: Il. ‘. ’ - STYLES FLOW THEORY ’ II_vr: w+: I:(nInIlII N; f‘ r ~| ;|3(. ];§r ‘ THEORY , l3Mtlt‘IIt‘II'I Cr ‘ ‘xi N ‘K 7 J I '« “.3 - 1 / IULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES THEORY I'Ioward Gardner classified human intelligences Into eight types. Each of these eight intelligences represents a relatively Independent form of information processing (Gardner, I983) EDDILVI-KINESTHETIC ISUAI. -SPATIA _ VIEILBAL - LINGUISTIC ‘IV‘ I 0/ ' xi ® ‘ o? + I ' . . 1 I ff. ‘i'. .‘i§. ".i. “i? ..“. .'. ‘:. ‘i'; ‘.“. '.'. ’.; Gardnersuggesrsihor each end has - - numb": a blend of two or more of these types. ’ K R ‘- the mind's eye musrcarhmumrc INTRAPERSONAL Nayi Disha’s interactive modules cater '§~—: -‘ ' ' to seven out of eight intelligences listed X ” [$7 ’ _; ’}§ © ' in this theory. I. J sensiflvify m sounds, .1-I. »rIru*Ii: %Iir. m.« introspective and rhythms, Lanes, . self-refllective ‘ t. and mum ‘ I[I| l[‘lL‘-IF“? -I'lI:4“I| l]! N tapatltles ‘ Im-min-uunmlm 113:‘ NI7YI*"? -‘Q-1’I)ISHA
  5. 5. LEARNING STYLES THEORY Apart from using different intelligences, children also have a preferred learning style that they use to grasp ideas and understand concepts. The simplest and most common way of identifying different learning styles is based on the senses. Commonly called the VAK model, this framework describes learners as visual, auditory, or kinesthetic. Visual learners most effectively process visual information; auditory learners understand best through hearing; and kinesthetic learners learn through touch and movement. (Miller, 2001) Nayi Disha’s modules allow children to utilize their preferred learning styles. With our modules being used in the classroom, children are no longer sedentary and teachers find them more active and engaged.
  6. 6. FLOw THEORY Flow theory provides a unique paradigm for studying engagement in educational video games as it takes into account, both game and student engagement. (Csikszentmihalyi, I990) Flow refers to a state of complete absorption or engagement in an activity, where the level of challenge matches an individual's skill and allows children to have deep, motivated, intense and long—term learning experiences. Control Apalhy Relaxation Fig.2 ) During our impact assessment study with preschool children, we concluded that 66 % of the class was found to be in a state of flow while learning through movement based modules. (See Fig .2) (Sarkar & Aneja, 2014)
  7. 7. MOVEMENT BASED CLASSROOM LEARNING Along with catering to the challenging needs of a kinesthetic learner, we also advocate for the inclusion of movement based learning into mainstream education. Movement based modules help the teacher to engage with the students in an effective manner. It also helps the child to register and recall concepts easily. A wide variety of researchers agree on the effectiveness of kinesthetic learning. According to Jean Piaget, although the abilities to abstract a concept and make complex connections between concepts are considered to be signatures of a mature mind, humans learn best by doing something concrete first, and then abstracting to more general concepts. Moreover, introducing children to movement based learning at an early stage is important because they enter kindergarten as kinesthetic and tactile learners, moving and touching everything as they learn. (Dunn & Dunn, 1978 to 1987) The induction of movement based learning in the ~--». » ' classrooms will help children stay active and engaged while they learn.
  8. 8. IAYI DISHA : A COMPREHENSIVE EDUCATIONAL TOOL Our modules benefit both, the learner and the teacher effectively. The teacher plays the role of a facilitator, making her extremely integral to the process of learning through our modules. Enhancing classroom instruction: The modules developed by Nayi Disha have enhanced the teaching experience by taking classroom instruction to a new level. Our modules collect three—dimensional information, thereby supporting various teaching activities like whole-class instruction, group work and one-to-one teacher-student interaction. Along with this, special instructional design can be produced to reinforce a connection between teaching contents and a student's physical responses. Movement based learning modules designed by us not only re—energize the classroom but also lead to experiential learning amongst the students. Enabling holistic learning: Children, we know love to hop, skip and jump; and are full of energy. Nayi Disha’s modules facilitate kinesthetic interactions that are able to coordinate with visual and auditory information , resulting in a holistic and immersive learning process. As they are able to interact with contents physically, students can make use of kinesthetic memory, enabling top-of-mind recall. Author of Smart Moves, Carla Hannaford, has also found out that movement awakens and activates our mental capacities. Moreover, movement integrates and anchors new information and experience into our neural networks (Hannaford, 1995). Feldman & McPhee also state that kinesthetic learners are most successful when totally engaged in an activity (Feldman & McPhee, 2007). NAYI ‘%’fL: ;DlSHA
  9. 9. "Young kids have diflrerent learning styles, some learn by looking, some by listening and many others by moving, this motion based technology helps our children hone all their learning styles and because there is movement involved, kids are no longer sedentary and teachersfind them more involved and focused. " _ - Swati Popat Vats, President, Early Childhood V g Association & Podar Education Network "Nayi Disha Studios is creating something truly amazing. We have found that the children's engagement in the learning process results in higher retention of the concepts. Most of all, Nayi Disha’s games solve one of our most challenging problems as educators - to make learning an enjoyable experience for the children - Ashok Pande_y, Principal, Ahlcon International School
  10. 10. OUR PARTNER SCHOOLS OUR REACH Mumbai Bengaluru Chennai Ahmedabad Nagpur Pune Hassan Daman UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Loudoun, VA Stamford, CT Ransom New Delhi Hyderabad Noida Jaipur Gurgaon Baroda Vapi
  11. 11. WORLD FORUM ON EARLY LEARNING AND CARE Nayi Disha and Kaju were honored To be a part of The World Forum on Early Learning and Care, 2014 in San Juan Puerio Rico. Our talk was a part of The session called ‘Tech Talks for Early Years’. We received a greai response from educators, researchers, school-Owners and policy-makers from over 81 counfries.
  12. 12. // D ‘ ’/ . Write To us at f , homework (at) nayidishastudios (dot) com i J / nayidishostudio E] / nayidishastudios . .p fl / nayidishastudios nu / noyidishosmdios www. nds. io www, nds. io/ biog Csikszenimihalyl, M. (T990). Flow . The Psychology Of Optimal Experience, Harper & Row. Dunn, R. , 8: Dunn, K. (i978). Teaching Secondary Studenls Through Their Individual Learning Styles. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. Feldman, J. , & Mcphee, D, (2007). The Science of Learning and The Ari of Teaching. Delmar Cengage Learning. Gardner, H. (1983). Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple intelligences. New Vork. New York, U S. A: Basic Books. Hannaford, C (1995). Smart Moves. Why Learning is not all in your head. . Arlington, VA : Great Ocean Publishers. Miller. E’. (2001). The rnulhmedla ofthe rnind. ED 451340. . "‘ *1 fr. - Sarkar, T, , & Anela, K. (20i4). Engaging students through games: Flow theory and Ils applications in The classroom. ECA — Early Childhood ‘ " 2) Association. Mumbai. A Tranauillo, J. (2008). Kinesthetic Learning in the classroom. ASSEE - American Society for Engineering Education, (p. 9). Pitlsburg.

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