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Geography ch.5 the united states- 2003 new

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Geography ch.5 the united states- 2003 new

  1. 1. Next Copyright © by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company Chapter 5 World Geography Physical Geography The Big Idea The United States is a large country with diverse physical features, climates, and resources. Main Ideas • Major physical features of the United States include mountains, rivers, and plains. • The climate of the United States is wetter in the East and South and drier in the West. • The United States is rich in natural resources such as farmland, oil, forests, and minerals.
  2. 2. Copyright © by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company NextPrevious Chapter 5 World Geography Atlantic Coastal Plain • Flat, close to sea level • Rises to a higher level called the Piedmont Appalachian Mountains • Main mountain range in the East • Millions of years of erosion so that highest peak is about 6,700 feet Main Idea 1: Major physical features of the United States include mountains, rivers, and plains. The United States is the third largest country. Physical features from east to west include: Interior Plains • Filled with hills, lakes, and rivers
  3. 3. Copyright © by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company NextPrevious Chapter 5 World Geography Great Lakes Physical Features {continued} • The largest group of freshwater lakes in the world • Important for trade between the United States and Canada Mississippi •North America’s longest and most important river •Has many tributaries, or smaller streams or rivers that flow into a larger stream or river •E.g., the Missouri and Ohio rivers which help drain the entire Interior Plains. •These rivers deposit rich silt that creates the fertile farmlands of the Interior Plains. Great Plains • At higher elevation has vast areas of grasslands
  4. 4. Copyright © by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company NextPrevious Chapter 5 World Geography Rocky Mountains Physical Features West of the Rockies Continental Divide •A line of high peaks in the Rocky Mountains •A continental divide is an area of high ground that divides the flow of rivers towards opposite ends of a continent. Rivers to the east empty into the Mississippi River and to the west into the Pacific Ocean. Alaska and Hawaii • Enormous rugged mountain ranges that rise above 14,000 feet • At 20,320 feet, Alaska’s Mount McKinley is the highest mountain in North America. • Hawaii formed by volcanoes millions of years ago. Next
  5. 5. Copyright © by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company NextPrevious Chapter 5 World Geography East and South •Northeast: Humid continental climate with snowy winters and warm, humid summers •South: Humid subtropical climate with milder winters and warm, humid summers •Florida: Warm all year Interior Plains •Most of the region: A humid continental climate •Great Plains: Hot and dry summers Main Idea 2: The climate of the United States is wetter in the East and South and drier in the West. West •West: Mostly dry •Pacific Northwest coast: A wet, mild coastal climate •Alaska: Sub-arctic and tundra climates •Hawaii: A warm, tropical climate
  6. 6. Copyright © by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company NextPrevious Chapter 5 World Geography Main Idea 3: The United States is rich in natural resources such as farmland, oil, forests, and minerals. • Alaska, California, or Louisiana: oil – The U.S. is a major oil producer but uses more oil than it produces. • Appalachians and Rockies: minerals including coal –Coal supplies the energy for more than half of the electricity produced in the U.S. – The U.S. has about 25 percent of the world’s coal reserves. • Forests: lumber • Farmlands: wheat, corn, soybeans, cotton, fruits, and vegetables
  7. 7. Copyright © by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company NextPrevious Chapter 5 World Geography History and Culture The Big Idea Democratic ideas and immigration have shaped the history and culture of the United States. Main Ideas • The United States is the world’s first modern democracy. • The people and culture of the United States are very diverse.
  8. 8. Copyright © by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company NextPrevious Chapter 5 World Geography • Mid-1700s: The British Empire included more than a dozen colonies along the Atlantic coast. • July 1776: The colonial representatives adopted the Declaration of Independence • 1781: General George Washington's army defeated the British in the Revolutionary War • Britain recognized the independence of the U.S. and granted the U.S. all its land east of the Mississippi River. Main Idea 1: The United States is the world’s first modern democracy. • 1500s: Europeans settlers established colonies, or territories inhabited and controlled by people from a foreign land.
  9. 9. Copyright © by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company NextPrevious Chapter 5 World Geography • These first settlers who traveled west for land and plentiful resources were called pioneers. • Groups of families undertook the harsh trip along the 2,000-mile Oregon Trail. • Most industrial cities in Northeast and Midwest. • The development of waterways and railroads helped industry and expansion into interior. Expansion and Industrial Growth
  10. 10. Copyright © by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company NextPrevious Chapter 5 World Geography • U.S. citizens have the right to vote from age 18. • Citizens are encouraged to participate in their government. U.S. Government and Citizenship • A limited, democratic government with an elected president and Congress • The Constitution defines the powers of the federal government. Rights and Responsibilities
  11. 11. Copyright © by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company NextPrevious Chapter 5 World Geography Main Idea 2: The people and culture of the United States are very diverse. Native Americans African Americans Hispanic Americans • For thousands of years, Native Americans were the only people in the Americas. • Today most live in the west, particularly in Arizona and New Mexico. • Many came from Mexico, Cuba, and other Latin American countries. • Most live in the southwestern states that border Mexico. European Descendents • About 7 out of every 10 people Asian Americans • Live mostly in California • African Americans live in every region, but southern states and many large cities have a higher percentage.
  12. 12. Copyright © by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company NextPrevious Chapter 5 World Geography Language and Religion Religion Language • Most people are Christians. Some are Jewish or Muslim. A small percentage is Hindu or Buddhist. • Many religious holidays: Christmas, Easter, Hanukkah, Yom Kippur, Rosh Hashanah, Ramadan and the feast called ‘Id al-Fitr • African Americans also celebrate Kwanzaa, a holiday that is based on a traditional African festival. • After English, Spanish is the most widely spoken language. • About 17 million Americans speak Spanish. • Over 50 million are bilingual, or speak two languages.
  13. 13. Copyright © by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company NextPrevious Chapter 5 World Geography Food, Music, and Popular Culture Popular Culture Food and Music • American culture, such as movies, television programs, and sports, are popular abroad. • Diverse ethnic foods like Mexican tacos, Italian pasta, or Japanese sushi are now part of the American diet. • Music from around the world have also influenced American culture. • American musical styles include blues, jazz, rock, and hip hop.
  14. 14. Copyright © by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company NextPrevious Chapter 5 World Geography The United States Today The Big Idea The United States has four main regions and faces opportunities and challenges. Main Ideas • The United States has four regions—the Northeast, South, Midwest, and West. • The United States has a strong economy and a powerful military but is facing the challenge of world terrorism.
  15. 15. Copyright © by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company NextPrevious Chapter 5 World Geography The South • Rich farmlands grow cotton, tobacco, and citrus fruit. • This region is becoming more urban and industrialized. –Atlanta metropolis has grown from 1 million in 1960 to 4 million today. Main Idea 1: The United States has four regions—the Northeast, South, Midwest, and West. The Northeast • Industrial and financial centers • Economy: banks, investment firms, insurance companies, respected universities • Rich farmland, coal, steel production, and fishing • Most densely populated region in the U.S. with 40 million people NextPrevious
  16. 16. Copyright © by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company NextPrevious Chapter 5 World Geography The West • More than 10 percent of the nation lives in California, where farming, technology, and entertainment are important industries. • Economy of other states: ranching and growing wheat • Mineral resources: coal, oil, gold, silver, copper, and others The Midwest and the West The Midwest • One of the most productive farming regions in the world • Crops: corn, wheat, and soybeans • Dairy farms in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota • Major cities are located near the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers and the Great Lakes because products are easily shipped to and from these centers.
  17. 17. Copyright © by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company NextPrevious Chapter 5 World Geography Main Idea 3: The United States has a strong economy and a powerful military but is facing the challenge of world terrorism. Military Economy • A powerful military to protect the U.S. • Helps other countries defend themselves • Largest economy in the world • Many natural resources, modern technologies, and jobs • Beneficial trade with Canada, Mexico, China, Japan, and Europe • 1992: The North American Free Trade Agreement, NAFTA, has made trade easier with Mexico and Canada.

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