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Griot: Open Source Storytelling Tool

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Copy of slide deck presented at the AAM MuseumExpo on Monday, April 27 at the Technology Innovation Stage

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts (MIA) has created an open source toolset for crafting and sharing engaging digital stories. “Griot”, a West African term for wise story-teller. The interpretive software is in use at the MIA, branded as ArtStories: http://artstories.artsmia.org ArtStories are available on tablet devices provided in the galleries, and for those using their own devices. The tools includes authoring content, presenting stories, and tiling & annotating images to enhance zooming, panning, and highlighting details.

This session will describe the development of the tools, demonstrate the software in action, discuss the results of a formal audience evaluation, and its impact on museum visitors.

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Griot: Open Source Storytelling Tool

  1. 1. Griot: An Open Source Digital Storytelling Platform Museums and the Web
  2. 2. What’s this session all about?
  3. 3. Griot
  4. 4. What’s a “Griot” ?
  5. 5. What is the MIA?
  6. 6. DH
  7. 7. Who am I?
  8. 8. Douglas Hegley Director of Media and Technology Minneapolis Institute of Arts This digital strategy needs some serious analysis.
  9. 9. TDX Project/Griot Software Development Team • Mike Mouw – TDX Project Manager: planning, concept implementation, timeline & scheduling, budget discipline, Product Owner • Andrew David - Head of Software Development: API development, infrastructure design • Kjell Olsen -Web Developer: image tiling / annotation development, front end integration • Misty Havens -Web Developer: front end development, WordPress • Tom Borger -Web Developer: WordPress plugin development, front end integration • Jennifer Jurgens - Graphic Designer-Web/Interactive Media: interface design and layout, art direction • Meaghan Tongen - Media and Technology Project Coordinator and ScrumMaster: rights coordinator, WordPress training • Paige Patet – TDX Project Assistant: project task management, authoring, editing
  10. 10. Why?
  11. 11. Language processing Language comprehension Smells Emotions Emotional reactions Memories Motor cortex Visual Images Your Brain on Facts Your Brain on Stories Human beings prefer narrative - No one speaks in database
  12. 12. Audience Insights Research EXPLORER / PROFESSIONAL 52% EXPERIENCE SEEKER 27% FACILITATING SOCIALIZER 8% FACILITATING PARENTS 7% RECHARGER 6% Brand champions Targeted programing already in place OK
  13. 13. How does MIA use stories to engage?
  14. 14. “To remain viable, museums must rethink not only what types of knowledge they create, but how/with whom they create it, and finally how they communicate it”. - Alex Bortolot, Content Strategist, MIA
  15. 15. PARTICIPANTS CONTENT: Overall Interpretive Framework The majority of our audiences do not come to us with deep prior knowledge. In order to engage as many of them as we can, it is our responsibility to deliver content that meets multiple and varied needs. GENERAL PUBLIC THE ENGAGED, CURIOUS NICHE Snorkeling Scuba diving Surface swimming Wading
  16. 16. CONTEXT Introduction What is this? Why does it matter? CONTENT Narratives & stories From surface to complex Tell me more … EXPERTISE Deep, rich Scholarly research The foundation of details & facts INFORMATION Invite, welcome Inspire, delight Inform CONTENT: Layers of Information PARTICIPANTS This is not, and never will be, “dumbing things down”. Instead, this is opening as many doors as possible, and meeting our audiences where they are, with respect and enthusiasm. GENERAL PUBLIC THE ENGAGED, CURIOUS NICHE Snorkeling Scuba diving Surface swimming Wading
  17. 17. What exactly is TDX at MIA?
  18. 18. BEFORE: “The nursing home of museum technology” - MIA staff, 2012
  19. 19. • Establish a modern approach • Engage audiences via digital platforms • Overall TDX Project Goals - Social interaction - Informal learning Ambition!
  20. 20. FUNDING Thank you!
  21. 21. Project Project Concept: 2012 Evaluation Report Vision Funding: 2012 Road map Budgets Project Initiation: 2013 Deadlines Deliverables Staffing: 2013 Project Mgr Project Asst Teams Delivery:2013-Today Phase 1 Africa Phase 2 Highlights Phase 3 Japan/Asia
  22. 22. Cross-functional Teams – Roles Defined
  23. 23. Writing Workshops: Curators as SMEs
  24. 24. What tools did TDX evaluate, then use?
  25. 25. Evaluated: PACHYDERM
  26. 26. Evaluated: IMA TAP
  27. 27. SS Evaluated: AIC LaunchPad
  28. 28. SS We have the technology We can build it
  29. 29. … with less than FIVE MONTHS to launch! Mike, are you okay? Mike?
  30. 30. Internal software development? Seriously?
  31. 31. Recommended: Commitment to 21st Century Leadership
  32. 32. Audience First Trust Frequent, small course corrections Honest, Transparent Iterative Cycles SHARED OWNERSHIP “Management”: Agile, Lean, Radical …
  33. 33. Speed, Efficiency, Productivity With Scrum
  34. 34. Iterative cycles – how does that work?
  35. 35. New Working Methods: Strong Collaboration, Rapid Prototyping and Iterative Cycles
  36. 36. Work Sessions
  37. 37. Iteration – Involving our Audiences
  38. 38. Collaboration
  39. 39. Remedial Evaluation
  40. 40. Working methods and tools?
  41. 41. Content Creation
  42. 42. Scholarship is the foundation of our work. Start there. Everyone likes an underdog. Don’t do just the highlights. Level with the visitor. Speak to universal experiences. Good stories trade on the visitor’s empathy • Who are your characters? • What is the situation? • What decisions did they make? • What were the stakes? Choosing stories – Which ones? Why those?
  43. 43. If you do nothing else, get rid of the passive voice. The passive voice denies people of their agency – and sounds like hedging. The active voice shifts the focus to people doing stuff. Tone and Voice
  44. 44. Is it an app, or is it a website? What’s the difference?
  45. 45. Decisions, decisions … Other Art Museum Factors: • Hi-rez content = heavy upload and large file size for an app “I won’t delete my music just for this app!” • Frequent updates, esp. with iterative dev approach “Yeah, we’re waiting on the App store approval again”
  46. 46. Apps Mobile Web Require Device-specific development and content creation Responsive design with HTML5 56
  47. 47. Apps Mobile Web Require Device-specific development and content creation Responsive design with HTML5 Work on Specific mobile devices Any browser 57
  48. 48. Apps Mobile Web Require Device-specific development and content creation Responsive design with HTML5 Work on Specific mobile devices Any browser Accessed Installed – can be deleted Accessed & rendered – can’t be deleted (can be ignored) 58
  49. 49. Apps Mobile Web Require Device-specific development and content creation Responsive design with HTML5 Work on Specific mobile devices Any browser Accessed Installed – can be deleted Accessed & rendered – can’t be deleted (can be ignored) Internet Might not need a connection Requires a connection 59
  50. 50. Apps Mobile Web Require Device-specific development and content creation Responsive design with HTML5 Work on Specific mobile devices Any browser Accessed Installed – can be deleted Accessed & rendered – can’t be deleted (can be ignored) Internet Might not need a connection Requires a connection Best for • Games • Use of GPS, accelerometer • Personalization • “Ownership” • Bragging rights/expectations • Content that changes often • Discovery via search • Sharing by users 60
  51. 51. Apps Mobile Web Require Device-specific development and content creation Responsive design with HTML5 Work on Specific mobile devices Any browser Accessed Installed – can be deleted Accessed & rendered – can’t be deleted (can be ignored) Internet Might not need a connection Requires a connection Best for • Games • Use of GPS, accelerometer • Personalization • “Ownership” • Bragging rights/expectations • Content that changes often • Discovery via Search • Sharing by users $$$ It’s gonna cost you … and it’s gonna cost others too • Less expense upfront • More flexible – if done right 61
  52. 52. Responsive Design One URL -> multiple devices (Chrome works best)
  53. 53. • Responsive website is not ALWAYS the way to go • Depends on multiple factors: requirements, constraints, flexibility, etc. • You’ll just have to decide yourself! It’s not a “rule” http://www.mdgadvertising.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/should-you-build-a-mobile-app-or-mobile-website.png
  54. 54. Technical features of Griot AngularJS MVW Framework WordPress CMS (other web CMS systems can be adapted for Griot, such as Drupal, Joomla, etc.) JSON Toolset components and detailed documentation HTML5 application that visitors view in the MIA galleries http://github.com/artsmia/griot WordPress Plugin for annotating images and writing content http://github.com/artsmia/GriotWP Image tiling application http://github.com/artsmia/tilesaw
  55. 55. What did TDX deliver?
  56. 56. Delivered: ArtStories
  57. 57. 4 Breaking News: Zulu Beer Pot ArtStory recognized in 2015 AAM Excellence in Exhibition Label Writing Competition
  58. 58. 6 Delivered: Study Table
  59. 59. What is open source? It’s free, right?
  60. 60. Open Source Software • “Free” download • No company • Community support • Can be modified • Susceptible to security issues • Requires technical skills Commercial Software • License fee • Maintenance fee • Company support • Often cannot be modified • May require less tech support Open Source
  61. 61. Griot is free and open source https://github.com/artsmia/griot We actively seek partners to use, modify, and share Griot back to the community
  62. 62. Has TDX been successful?
  63. 63. Formal Evaluation
  64. 64. • Visitors will use technology in the galleries. • They will spend a significant amount of time with the technology, and will read aloud and discuss as they do so. • The technology was used effectively and with positive response by individuals and groups.
  65. 65. • The use of technology does not detract from visitor focus on the art. • When visitors left the gallery, the descriptions of their visit were almost exclusively about the art, and notably not about the technology.
  66. 66. • People who used the technology spent more time in the exhibit than those that did not use the technology • even after subtracting the time spent using the technology
  67. 67. Next Up: Evaluation of Phase 2
  68. 68. Who else is using Griot?
  69. 69. Saint Louis Art Museum
  70. 70. The de Young (FAMSF)
  71. 71. Can we see it now please?
  72. 72. Live Demo(gasp!)
  73. 73. What’s next? What’s on the horizon for Griot?
  74. 74. Minneapolis Institute of Arts Living Rooms: The Period Room Projects Our 18th century rooms speak about contemporary issues like race, gender, technology, and the 24-hour economy Focus on the Arts of Asia Challenge: thematic groupings, instead of objects Global Maps (fingers crossed!) Stories of global trade and exchange told through a digital map interface
  75. 75. ? More Partners (Let’s Build it Together)
  76. 76. This presentation available at: http://www.slideshare.net/dhegley Thank you! Questions? More information on Griot: http://thoughtsparked.blogspot.com/ Douglas Hegley: @dhegley Mike Mouw: @MikeMouw

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