Moodle Final Project Week 10

1,304 views

Published on

My final presentation done for EDUC 8841. This presentation was not created with the intent to show it to the board of Penta. The presentation followed a rubric with specific guidelines and specifications.

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,304
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
14
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
29
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • MOODLE was designed after lead user Dougiamus’ became disillusioned with his current online course management system, Web CT (Moodle Background, 2009, para. 2).At that time, current online course shells did not support Dougiamus’ vision of a constructivist online environment (Wikipedia - Moodle, 2009, para. 19).
  • MOODLE was designed by Martin Dougiamus (Moodle background, 2009, para. 1.). Dougiamus wanted an open source software application that supported social constructivism (Wikipedia - Moodle, n.d., para. 16). Dougiamus was the lead thinker and he produced MOODLE himself (Moodle background, 2009, para. 7).
  • Problems include storage of MOODLE on a server and lack of support (Brooks – Young, 2008, para. 6).MOODLE 1.0 was released in 2002 and focused on smaller post secondary courses (Moodle background, 2009, para. 7).
  • Moodle.org was created as a network for MOODLE users(Moodle background, 2009, para. 9).Moodle.com, a company established to help Moodle users, was established in 2003 (Moodle background, 2009, para. 10).
  • Rogers (2003) identified five stages in the innovation-decision making process.KnowledgePersuasionDecisionImplementationConfirmation
  • Rogers (2003) defined knowledge as “when an individual (or other decision-making unit) is exposed to an innovation’s existence and gains an understanding of how it functions” (Rogers, 2003, p. 171).MOODLE was released to the public in 2001 (Dougiamas, 2009 , para. 10).MOODLE is supported by the MOODLE community which took off in 2002 (Dougiamas, 2009, para. 13).Dougiamas and Taylor (2002) presented MOODLE at conferences and published their findings.
  • Rogers (2003) defined the persuasion stage as the stage where “the individual forms a favorable or unfavorable attitude toward the innovation” (Rogers, 2003, p. 174).The first MOODLEMoot, face to face meeting of MOODLE users, happened in 2004 (Dougiamas, 2009 , para. 13).MOODLE grew in 2004 from 1000 registered sites to 2334 (Dougiamas, 2009 , para. 13).
  • Rogers (2003) defined the decision stage as “when an individual (or other decision making unit) engages in activities that lead to a choice to adopt or reject an innovation” (Rogers, 2003, p. 177). In 2005, both Campussource and the Open University endorsed MOODLE. Open Univeristy was a key adopter for the success of MOODLE (Dougiamas, 2009 , para. 14).
  • Rogers (2003) defined the implementation stage as “when an individual (or other decision-making unit) puts an innovation to use” (Rogers, 2003, p. 179).In 2005, the first how-to MOODLE book was published. There have been at least six more published since (Dougiamas, 2009 , para. 16).Nasrin (2009) reported there were 16,927,590 users of MOODLE in 2008 (Nasrin, 2009, p. 2).Nasrin (2009) explained that MOODLE is continually reinvented by developers because of its Open Source distribution which allows developers to adapt the program to their individual need (Nasrin, 2009, p. 13).
  • Rogers (2003) defined the confirmation stage as when “the individual (or other decision-making unit) seeks reinforcement for the innovation-decision already made, and may reverse this decision if exposed to conflicting messages about the innovation” (Rogers, 2003, p. 189).MOODLE plans on creating a “best practices” community highlighting successful MOODLE implementation (Dougiamas, 2009 , para. 30).In 2009, MOODLE had 52,153 registered sites (Wikipedia - Moodle, n.d., para. 21).
  • Dougiamus presented MOODLE at conferences and published articles.Moodle.com was established.MoodleMoots bring MOODLE users together.MOODLE how-to books are in print.MOODLE plans on creating “best practices” community.Dougiamus presented MOODLE at conferences and published articles.Moodle.com was established.MoodleMoots bring MOODLE users together.MOODLE how-to books are in print.MOODLE plans on creating “best practices” community.
  • Dougiamas (2009) reported MOODLE had grown from 1000 to 2334 registered sites in 2004.Alier, Casany, and Casado (2007) reported 19,001 registered sites in November 2006Cole, J. (2007) reported 32,000 registered sites in October 2007.When I made my S-Curve, I interpreted the data reported by MOODLE from March 2009 until December 2009 as the slowdown of the S. This is a hypothetical prediction that MOODLE growth has slowed and may or may not come to fruition. Even though the MOODLE site had the provided chart, I used actual data for the creation of my S-Curve. The MOODLE site did not provide historical data which made this process very tedious and time consuming.De Zwart (2008) reported 38,896 registered sites in January 2008.Moodle.org – background (2009) reported 45,710 registered sites in December 2009.
  • Roger’s (2003) classified innovators into five categories; “innovators” (Rogers, 2003, p. 282), “early adopters” (Rogers, 2003, p. 283), “early majority” (Rogers, 2003, p. 283), “late majority” (Rogers, 2003, p. 284), and “laggards” (Rogers, 2003, p. 284). Innovators were described in terms of Simmel’s “stranger” (Rogers, 2003, pp. 290-291), people who are on the fringe of society and are willing to deviate from group norms.Rogers (2003) described early adopters as leaders of group opinion. Rogers (2003) described the early majority as people who are open to adoption that prefer to follow other’s lead. Rogers (2003) described the late majority as individuals who need to be influenced to adopt by outside pressure.Rogers (2003) described laggards as people who are influenced by the past and resist change.
  • Paid research time would help innovators.Copyright ownership and credit will also increase innovators.Extra time to work on innovations would increase innovators.Administrative support would help innovators.
  • Early adopters are teachers or support staff who learn of the new innovation and integrate it. These early adopters could carry an official title, such as department head, or be “unofficial” school leaders.One strategy is to allow early adopters to attend technology conferences to learn about new ideas and innovations.Stipend for time would also increase early adopters.
  • At our school, this is the group of teachers and support staff who try the new innovation they learned of from the early adopter. When there are enough early majority, the technology director has to pay attention and allow the innovation to become accepted.One strategy would be to have a technology director who is open to new innovations and willing to work with early majority members.Incentives would work well with the early majority.
  • This is the group of teachers and support staff who wait until the technology director provides in-services on the new technology. These individuals will use the technology only if all the bugs are worked out.One strategy for the late majority is to have the technology director approve the new technology earlier.Another strategy is to offer more quality training for the new innovation.
  • There is a contingent of teachers and support staff at our school who have taught the same way for thirty years and refuse to change their methods. Many believe that if the methods were good enough for them, today’s students can learn the same way.The only strategy to get laggards to adopt the new technology is to require its implementation. This may be a problem if it violates the contract as agreed upon by the administration and the union.
  • Innovator – MOODLE was designed by Martin Dougiamus (Moodle background, 2009, para. 1.). Early Adopters – A few teachers learned of MOODLE at different conferences and a few have downloaded it and began to play with it.Early Majority – These teachers have shown and discussed the potential of MOODLE with other teachers who have begun to think about potential MOODLE use in their classrooms.Late Adopters – If the technology director would approve MOODLE, the staff could have an opening training and begin using it.Laggards – Many laggards would resist MOODLE, however if parents started demanding it from them, they would eventually start to use it.
  • Rogers (2003) described “five attributes of innovations”(Rogers, 2003, p. 223) including; “relative advantage” (Rogers, 2003, p. 229), “compatibility” (Rogers, 2003, p. 240), “complexity” (Rogers, 2003, p. 257), “trialability” (Rogers, 2003, p. 258), and “observability” (Rogers, 2003, p. 258).Relative Advantage - MOODLE needs increase student academic performanceCompatibility – MOODLE needs to work with the existing technology infrastructureComplexity – MOODLE needs to be complex enough to offer features, but easy enough to be quickly learnedTrialability – A select test group of teachers can implement MOODLE for a year to work out problemsObservability – Teachers need to see other teachers in the building using MOODLE – a link to the school website would allow this
  • Rogers (2003) described a centralized approach as a “top down” (Rogers, 2003, p.401) diffusion in which innovation is created by “technically-expert officials” (Rogers, 2003, p. 395). Rogers (2003) defined decentralized diffusion systems as one where the innovation comes from within and is adopted “horizontally via peer networks” (Rogers, 2003, p. 395).Even though MOODLE is a decentralized diffusion approach outside of the school system, inside our school, the only way it will succeed is if it is a centralized approach. Because the technology director needs to approve all websites to remove the Internet filter, a decentralized approach would not work.
  • Rogers (2003) defined the seven roles of a change agent as, “to develop a need for change on the part of the clients”, “to establish an information exchange relationship”, to diagnose problems”, to create an intent to change in the client”, to translate intentions into actions”, to stabilize adoption and prevention discontinuance”, and “to achieve a terminal relationship with clients” (Rogers, 2003, p. 400).
  • The school were I work is a career center for tenth through twelfth grades located in the Midwestern United States. Students are trained in 36 different career programs for half a day and college preparatory academics for the other half of the day. Students are drawn from 16 different school districts that are both suburban and rural. I recommend creating a focus team to look at the best ways to implement MOODLE. I suggest including; the technology director, the director (our version of a principal), three career teachers who are willing to lead MOODLE implementation, and three academic teachers who are willing to lead MOODLE implementation.
  • Rogers (2003) defined critical mass as the place where further adoption becomes “self-sustaining” (Rogers, 2003, p. 343).Wyles (2007) claimed MOODLE had already achieved critical mass in 2007 and that adoption of MOODLE at that point was a no brainer.With 16,927,590 users (Nasrin, 2009, p. 2). I concur with Wyles statement; MOODLE is self-sustaining in 2010.1. Rogers (2003) recommended getting teachers who other teachers look up to as the first adopters of MOODLE.2. Rogers (2003) suggested presenting MOODLE to the staff as “inevitable” and “ very desirable” (Rogers, 2003, p. 361).3. Rogers (2003) explained MOODLE should be introduced to existing groups such as the business cluster, who are more technologically innovative.4. Rogers (2003) suggested adding “incentives” (Rogers, 2003, p. 361) to reach critical mass. At Penta, these incentives could include stipend hours and free training that counts towards college credit and Continuing Educational Units (CEU)s.
  • 1. Rogers (2003) recommended getting teachers who other teachers look up to as the first adopters of MOODLE.2. Rogers (2003) suggested presenting MOODLE to the staff as “inevitable” and “ very desirable” (Rogers, 2003, p. 361).3. Rogers (2003) explained MOODLE should be introduced to existing groups such as the business cluster, who are more technologically innovative.4. Rogers (2003) suggested adding “incentives” (Rogers, 2003, p. 361) to reach critical mass. At Penta, these incentives could include stipend hours and free training that counts towards college credit and Continuing Educational Units (CEU)s.1. Get teachers who other teachers look up to as the first adopters of MOODLE.2. Present MOODLE to the staff as “inevitable” and “ very desirable”.3. MOODLE should be introduced to existing groups such as the business cluster, who are more technologically innovative.4. Incentives - At Penta, these incentives could include stipend hours and free training that counts towards college credit and Continuing Educational Units (CEU)s.
  • Focus Group work as a form of “skunkworks” for one yearMOODLE = adaptable for a variety of situationsOver year focus group adapt MOODLE specifically for application at Penta
  • ReferencesAlier, M., Casany, M. J., &Casado, P. (2007). A mobile extension of a web based MOODLE virtual classroom. Retrieved from http://www.essi.upc.edu/~mjcasany/Maria_Jose_Casany_Homepage/Publications_files/07.echallenges.pdfBrooks – Young, S. (2008). Got moodle? The Journal. Retrieved from http://thejournal.com/Articles/2008/04/01/Got-Moodle.aspx?Page=1Cole, J. (2007). Moodle and the Future of Learning. Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net/jason.cole/nitle-keynote-jc1#stats-bottomDe Zwart, H. (2008). The Future of Moodle and How Not to Stop It. Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net/hansdezwart/the-future-of-moodle-and-how-not-to-stop-it-presentationDougiamas, M. (2009). Moodle: a case study in sustainability. Retrieved from http://www.oss-watch.ac.uk/resources/cs-moodle.xmlDougiamus, M. & Taylor, P. (2002). Interpretive analysis of an internet-based course constructed using a new courseware tool called Moodle. Paper presented at the Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia  (HERDSA) 2002 conference, Adelaide, South Australia. Retrieved from http://moodletraining.pbworks.com/historyMoodle.org – background (2009). Retrieved from http://docs.moodle.org/en/BackgroundMoodle.org – stats (2009). Retrieved from http://moodle.org/stats/Nasrin, N. (2009). University on web: A case study of using MOODLE for course work. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10361/394 Rogers, E. M. (2003). Diffusion of innovations (5th ed.). New York: Free Press. Wikipedia – Moodle (n. d.). Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MoodleWikipedia – Moodle (n. d.). Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MoodleWyles, R. (2007) Choosing an LMS. [Web log message]. Retrieved from https://eduforge.org/blog/blog.php?/authors/2-richardwyles
  • Moodle Final Project Week 10

    1. 1. MOODLE Presentation to Penta Career Center’s Board of Education<br />Presented by Dave Harms<br />
    2. 2. Need for MOODLE at Penta<br />Better Communication<br />
    3. 3. Need<br />Dougiamus’ need for creating MOODLE<br />Martin Dougiamus<br />Disillusioned<br />Vision<br />
    4. 4. Research<br />MOODLE was designed by Martin Dougiamus <br />
    5. 5. Development<br />Problems encountered<br /> storage of MOODLE on a server <br /> lack of support<br />
    6. 6. Commercialization<br />Moodle.org – network for MOODLE users<br />Moodle.com – help for<br />MOODLE users<br />
    7. 7. Innovation-Decision Making Process<br />Five stages in the innovation-decision making process.<br />
    8. 8. Knowledge<br />Knowledge - “when an individual (or other decision-making unit) is exposed to an innovation’s existence and gains an understanding of how it functions”<br /><ul><li>2001 - released to the public
    9. 9. 2002 -supported by the MOODLE community</li></ul> -MOODLE 1.0 released<br /><ul><li>Dougiamas and Taylor</li></li></ul><li>Persuasion<br />Persuasion stage- the stage where “the individual forms a favorable or unfavorable attitude toward the innovation”<br />2004<br />First <br />MOODLEMoot, face to face meeting for users<br />MOODLE <br />grew in 2004 from 1000 registered sites to 2334<br />
    10. 10. Decision<br />Decision stage – “when an individual (or other decision making unit) engages in activities that lead to a choice to adopt or reject an innovation”<br />
    11. 11. Implimentation<br />Implementation stage – “when an individual (or other decision-making unit) puts an innovation to use” <br />2005 - how-to MOODLE books<br />2008 - 16,927,590 users<br />MOODLE – continually being reinvented <br />
    12. 12. Confirmation<br />Confirmation stage – “the individual (or other decision-making unit) seeks reinforcement for the innovation-decision already made, and may reverse this decision if exposed to conflicting messages about the innovation” <br />successful MOODLE implementation<br />2009 - 52,153 registered sites <br />
    13. 13. Best communication channels<br />Conferences<br />Published articles.<br />Moodle.com<br />MoodleMoots<br />How-to books<br />“best practices” community.<br />
    14. 14. Moodle.org – stats (2009)<br />Graph showing MOODLE implementation since its inception. <br />
    15. 15. S-Curve<br />
    16. 16. Five Classifications of Innovators<br />
    17. 17. Innovators<br />Innovators - individual teachers/staff with a creative way to do something. <br />STRAGETIES<br /><ul><li>Paid research time
    18. 18. Copyright ownership and credit
    19. 19. Extra time to work on innovations
    20. 20. Administrative support</li></li></ul><li>Early Adopters<br />Early adopters – teachers/staff who learn of the new innovation and integrate it. <br />STRAGETIES<br /><ul><li>Allowed to learn about new ideas and innovations
    21. 21. Stipend for time</li></li></ul><li>Early Majority<br />Early Majority -group of teachers/staff who try the new innovation they learned of from the early adopter. <br />STRAGETIES<br /><ul><li>Technology director
    22. 22. open to new innovations
    23. 23. willing to work with early majority members.
    24. 24. Incentives</li></li></ul><li>Late Majority<br />Late Majority - group of teachers/staff who wait until the technology director provides in-services on the new technology. <br />STRAGETIES<br /><ul><li>Technology director </li></ul>– approve new technology earlier.<br /><ul><li>Offer quality training</li></li></ul><li>Laggards<br />Laggards - believe that if the methods were good enough for them, today’s students can learn the same way.<br />STRAGETIES<br /><ul><li>Require its implementation.
    25. 25. Union contracts and company policies. </li></li></ul><li>Five Classifications of MOODLE <br />
    26. 26. Attributes Best Attribute for MOODLE<br />Relative Advantage increase student academic performance<br />Compatibility work with existing technology<br />Complexity complex enough to offer features, <br /> easy enough to be quickly learned<br />Trialabilitytest group can implement MOODLE to work out problems<br />ObservabilitySeeMOODLE being used in house<br /> –a link to the school website <br />Five Attributes of Innovations<br />
    27. 27. Centralized/ Decentralized Approach<br />Centralized approach - “top down” diffusion in which innovation is created by “technically-expert officials”<br />Decentralized diffusion systems - one where the innovation comes from within and is adopted “horizontally via peer networks”<br />MOODLE is a decentralized diffusion approach<br />BUT…<br />inside our school, centralized approach is needed<br />WHY? <br />The technology director - approves all websites<br />
    28. 28. Seven Roles of a Change Agent <br />
    29. 29. Penta Change Agents<br />Penta<br />10-12 grade<br />36 career programs ½ day<br />college prep academics ½ day<br />students com from 16 different school districts (suburban and rural)<br />Penta Focus Team<br />
    30. 30. Critical Mass<br />Critical mass - the place where further adoption becomes “self-sustaining”<br />16,927,590users <br />self-sustaining in 2010.<br />achieved critical mass in 2007 and that adoption of MOODLE<br />
    31. 31. Four Strategies to Reach Critical Mass <br />Strategies @ Penta Career Center<br />
    32. 32. Champions Define Need<br />
    33. 33. Matching Innovation To Need<br />Focus Group<br />
    34. 34. Further Info<br />Links to MOODLE related sites:<br />http://moodle.org/<br />http://docs.moodle.org/<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moodle<br />http://download.moodle.org/<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8eO7axqxr4<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z9XfwBzt1mY<br />
    35. 35. Final Thoughts on MOODLE<br />MOODLE Increases Communication<br />

    ×