Welcome<br />Open Source Software – Day 1<br />How free is free?<br />Presented by Deb Forsten<br />
Is free free?<br />The Free Software Foundation refers to open source “free” software in terms of freedom not necessarily ...
Taking Webinar Notes- screen captures<br />
Open Source  - Topics Covered<br />General Definition<br />Origin & Historical Perspective<br />Open verses Proprietary<br...
General Definition<br />Introduction - Open source doesn't just mean access to the source code. The distribution terms of ...
The GNU General Public License (GPL)<br />Preamble (1991)<br />The licenses for most software are designed to take away yo...
Origin & Historical Perspective<br />Concept started in the early 1900 with the automobile industry<br />Gasoline patent h...
Open Source verses proprietary code?<br />Open Source<br />advantages: free, enormous community of users/developers<br />C...
How do I find resources?<br />Google it<br />Sourceforge.net<br />Osalt.com<br />php.opensourcecms.com/<br />
Open Source Software Functions<br />Office Applications (word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, database, image edi...
Free Software<br />Not all free software is open source<br />Beware of free applications<br />Definitely beware of added v...
Guidelines for checking out a free application<br />Once you find one – Google it for title and spyware<br />Case Study – ...
Free version verses $69.95/annual Pro Version:<br />Basic difference is <br /><ul><li>file sharing
screen sharing
Drag-n-drop file transfer</li></ul>Answer the question: what do you need this application to do?<br />
Let’s Compare Office applications<br />MS Office 2010<br />Open Office<br />
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Open Source_Day 1-presentation

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AWC Webinar - August 8-24-2010
Open Source Software - How free is free.

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Open Source_Day 1-presentation

  1. 1. Welcome<br />Open Source Software – Day 1<br />How free is free?<br />Presented by Deb Forsten<br />
  2. 2. Is free free?<br />The Free Software Foundation refers to open source “free” software in terms of freedom not necessarily price<br />So open source actually refers to the free access to the source code of a project/application<br />We will also refer to the cost of the learning curve involved in learning new technologies and the cost of NOT learning about alternative software solutions<br />
  3. 3. Taking Webinar Notes- screen captures<br />
  4. 4. Open Source - Topics Covered<br />General Definition<br />Origin & Historical Perspective<br />Open verses Proprietary<br />Functions – what can you use open source for<br />Free verses open source<br />Demonstration of Office 2010 verses Open office<br />Questions<br />
  5. 5. General Definition<br />Introduction - Open source doesn't just mean access to the source code. The distribution terms of open-source software must comply with the following criteria: <br />Free Redistribution The license shall not restrict any party from selling or giving away the software as a component of an aggregate software distribution containing programs from several different sources. The license shall not require a royalty or other fee for such sale. <br />Source Code The program must include source code, and must allow distribution in source code as well as compiled form. Where some form of a product is not distributed with source code, there must be a well-publicized means of obtaining the source code for no more than a reasonable reproduction cost preferably, downloading via the Internet without charge. The source code must be the preferred form in which a programmer would modify the program. Deliberately obfuscated source code is not allowed. Intermediate forms such as the output of a preprocessor or translator are not allowed. <br />Derived Works The license must allow modifications and derived works, and must allow them to be distributed under the same terms as the license of the original software. <br />Integrity of The Author's Source Code The license may restrict source-code from being distributed in modified form only if the license allows the distribution of "patch files" with the source code for the purpose of modifying the program at build time. The license must explicitly permit distribution of software built from modified source code. The license may require derived works to carry a different name or version number from the original software. <br />No Discrimination Against Persons or Groups The license must not discriminate against any person or group of persons. <br />No Discrimination Against Fields of Endeavor The license must not restrict anyone from making use of the program in a specific field of endeavor. For example, it may not restrict the program from being used in a business, or from being used for genetic research. 7<br />Distribution of License The rights attached to the program must apply to all to whom the program is redistributed without the need for execution of an additional license by those parties. <br />License Must Not Be Specific to a Product The rights attached to the program must not depend on the program's being part of a particular software distribution. If the program is extracted from that distribution and used or distributed within the terms of the program's license, all parties to whom the program is redistributed should have the same rights as those that are granted in conjunction with the original software distribution. 9<br />License Must Not Restrict Other Software The license must not place restrictions on other software that is distributed along with the licensed software. For example, the license must not insist that all other programs distributed on the same medium must be open-source software. <br />License Must Be Technology-Neutral No provision of the license may be predicated on any individual technology or style of interface. <br />
  6. 6. The GNU General Public License (GPL)<br />Preamble (1991)<br />The licenses for most software are designed to take away your freedom to share and change it. By contrast, the GNU General Public License is intended to guarantee your freedom to share and change free software--to make sure the software is free for all its users. This General Public License applies to most of the Free Software Foundation's software and to any other program whose authors commit to using it. (Some other Free Software Foundation software is covered by the GNU Library General Public License instead.) You can apply it to your programs, too.<br />When we speak of free software, we are referring to freedom, not price. Our General Public Licenses are designed to make sure that you have the freedom to distribute copies of free software (and charge for this service if you wish), that you receive source code or can get it if youwant it, that you can change the software or use pieces of it in new free programs; and that you know you can do these things.<br />
  7. 7. Origin & Historical Perspective<br />Concept started in the early 1900 with the automobile industry<br />Gasoline patent holders tried to control automobile makers development – Henry Ford challenged and won – open standards were used up through WWII<br />Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (ARPANET) – used a similar procedure to share IBM’s operating system in the 50’s & 60’s in computers<br />In 1983-85 – Richard Stallman(MIT) founded the Free Software foundation to support the GNU Project and the GNU General Public License (GNU GPL or simply GPL)<br />Open Source terminology and Open Source Initiative (OSI) evolved in 1998 (supported by Netscape….)<br />
  8. 8. Open Source verses proprietary code?<br />Open Source<br />advantages: free, enormous community of users/developers<br />Commercial/Proprietary Coding <br />advantages: more security, more control, much more money<br />Why would some one give away the code?<br />Is it a sub-standard product?<br />Your decisions should be based on what you need software to do for you.<br />
  9. 9. How do I find resources?<br />Google it<br />Sourceforge.net<br />Osalt.com<br />php.opensourcecms.com/<br />
  10. 10. Open Source Software Functions<br />Office Applications (word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, database, image editors)<br />Text Editors<br />Image Editors - galleries<br />Web Content managers<br />Audio/Video editors/converters<br />
  11. 11. Free Software<br />Not all free software is open source<br />Beware of free applications<br />Definitely beware of added value packages that you “Check” at the completion of installation<br />“mywebsearchtoolbar”<br />
  12. 12. Guidelines for checking out a free application<br />Once you find one – Google it for title and spyware<br />Case Study – Logmein – remote desktop access<br />Try before you buy!<br />
  13. 13. Free version verses $69.95/annual Pro Version:<br />Basic difference is <br /><ul><li>file sharing
  14. 14. screen sharing
  15. 15. Drag-n-drop file transfer</li></ul>Answer the question: what do you need this application to do?<br />
  16. 16. Let’s Compare Office applications<br />MS Office 2010<br />Open Office<br />
  17. 17. In Summary<br />Open Source – great resource for a variety of functions<br />Open Source – because of the collaborative process is often a superior product for your purpose<br />Is it right for you?<br />
  18. 18. Resources & Questions<br />Contact me at<br />deb@zenithassociates.com<br />www.zenithassociates.com<br />

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