4.2 - Population Geography

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Aspects of population geography.

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4.2 - Population Geography

  1. 1. Population Geography
  2. 2. <ul><li>There are a lot of people in the world and more all the time. </li></ul><ul><li>Currently over 6.5 billion. </li></ul><ul><li>Estimates are that it will be over 9 billion by 2050. That’s almost a 50% increase in just 44 years! </li></ul><ul><li>What sorts of problems does this present? </li></ul>
  3. 6. <ul><li>Things that affect population growth: </li></ul><ul><li>Birth rate </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The number of live births for every 1,000 people in a given population. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Fertility rate </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The estimated number of children a woman may have in her lifetime in a given population. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The replacement rate is 2.1 kids per mother. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>There are two parents, so two kids are needed to replace them. It’s 2.1 because you have to account for accidental deaths of young children. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The worldwide rate is now about 3.0. So we’re increasing. </li></ul></ul>
  4. 7. <ul><li>Mortality rate </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Number of deaths per every thousand people in a given population. </li></ul></ul>
  5. 8. <ul><li>Infant mortality rate </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Number of deaths of infants per every thousand live births. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This statistic is often used to gauge the health and healthcare abilities of a nation. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The U.S. currently ranks 42 nd in lowest infant mortality rate with a rate of 6.5. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can sometimes be a troublesome statistic because there is no uniform method across countries of measuring it. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Some countries don’t count it if the child dies within the first day, for example, or if it doesn’t breath upon birth. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>These are also self-reported by each country and some may be motivated to play with the numbers. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  6. 9. <ul><ul><li>Also, the more developed countries (with the will) will attempt to deliver at-risk babies at earlier times in the term. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The U.S. generally considers it a live birth if it’s obviously alive when it comes out, reports accurately, and delivers lots of premies. Because of this, its stats seem unusually low. </li></ul></ul>
  7. 10. <ul><li>Population pyramid </li></ul>
  8. 11. <ul><li>Shows the age and gender distribution of a society. </li></ul><ul><li>Allows geographers to evaluate the effect of different events. </li></ul>
  9. 12. <ul><li>Push-pull factors </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Factors that compel people to migrate, either compelling them to leave an area (pushing them out) or that which attracts them to new areas (pulls them towards it). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What are historical examples of each? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Carrying capacity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The ability of land to support a population. The greater its carrying capacity, the more people it can support. </li></ul></ul>

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