Corporate fashions Inc: Case Study on Sampling, Business Research Methods

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Case study Solution of Corporate Fashions Inc.
It is a case study in Sampling, business research methods

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Corporate fashions Inc: Case Study on Sampling, Business Research Methods

  1. 1. Corporate Fashions, Inc. (A) Section A Group 6 Abhay Sharma 1A Aniruddh Srivastava 9A Devansh Doshi Manasi Jain 16A 23A Sachin Gupta 38A Vidooshi Joshi 55A
  2. 2. Case Summary (1/3) Corporate Fashions, Inc., was a national franchiser of specialty retail shops that sell wear-to-the-office clothing to career-oriented, professional working women. The company was looking into the possibility of opening a store in the Forest View Shopping Center in a suburb of Chicago.  It located its stores in those major metropolitan areas which were believed to contain the highest number of professional career women. The stores were typically places in large shopping centers surrounded by the residential areas in which the targeted women were believed to reside. Only large shopping centers with a number of stores of the type that attracted professional career women were considered candidate sites for a Corporate Fashions store.  The Forest View Shopping Center was being considered as a possible site for a Corporate Fashions store because of the number and quality of stores in the center. 
  3. 3. Case Summary (2/3) Figures provided by the shopping center manager indicated that the shopping center’s traffic and sales volume more than likely could support a Corporate Fashions store. The main concern among Corporate Fashions management was whether an adequate proportion of the woemn shoppers at Forest View were the type of professional career women that Corporate Fashions was trying to attract to its stores.  Because the shopping center was unable to provide detailed information about the professional career woemn shoppers, Corporate Fashions management decided to undertake a survey to obtain the desired information. Corporate Fashions managers felt that one of their stores would be successful in the Forst View Shopping Center if at least 10% of the shopping center’s female shoppers were members of their target market. 
  4. 4. Case Summary (3/3)  Characteristics of female shoppers of the target market of Corporate Fashions: ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ Employed full-time 25-45 years of age Earns $30,000 or more annually Regularly shops at Forest View Buys clothing of the type sold by Corporate Fashions Spends at least $600 per year on such clothing Spends at least $200 per year in specialty stores Buys from specialty stores that are not price-oriented Corporate Fashions managers wanted an accurate estimate of the proportion of Forest View’s female shoppers who were professional career women.  Research showed that approximately 96% of all Forest View female shoppers resided in 15 communities (E.g. Elmhurst, Hinsdale, Villa Park, Western Springs and others) 
  5. 5. Management Decision Problem  Corporate Fashions, Inc. wants to know if they should open a store in the Forest View Shopping Center, suburb of Chicago.
  6. 6. Research Problem  To determine if there are adequate women shoppers at Forest View that fall in the Target Group of the company
  7. 7. Sampling Design A (1/3)    Obtain the telephone directories of all of the 15 communities within the Forest View market area Select a probability sample of names and telephone numbers from each community These names and numbers could be used to undertake a telephone survey designed to identify women who shopped at Forest View and whether or not they were also professional career women.
  8. 8. Sampling Design A (2/3) Degree of targeting achieved: Only geographic  Sampling Framework: Telephone directories of all of the 15 communities within the Forest View market area  Sampling method: Probabilistic, Simple Random 
  9. 9. Sampling Design A (3/3) Advantages Disadvantages
  10. 10. Sampling Design B (1/3)    Use a map to identify the ZIP code areas comprising the 15 communities in Forest View’s market area Corporate Fashions could then go to one of the large commercial research service companies, such as Donnelley, and purchase a random sample of names, addresses, and telephone numbers selected from all of the households in the identified ZIP code areas This random list could be used in the
  11. 11. Sampling Design B(2/3) Degree of targeting achieved: Only geographic  Sampling Framework: random sample of names, addresses, and telephone numbers selected from all of the households in the identified ZIP code areas  Sampling method: Probabilistic, Simple Random 
  12. 12. Sampling Design B (3/3) Advantages Disadvantages
  13. 13. Sampling Design C (1/3) Use 1980 Census of Housing data covering the census tracts comprising Forest View’s market area  Using area sampling methods, an inhome personal interview study could be designed by randomly selecting a certain number of blocks in each community, then randomly selecting certain dwelling units in each of the selected blocks 
  14. 14. Sampling Design C (2/3) Degree of targeting achieved: Only geographic Age, income, and gender can be inferred  Sampling Framework: 1980 Census of Housing data covering the census tracts comprising Forest View’s market area  Sampling method: Probabilistic, Cluster Sampling 
  15. 15. Sampling Design C (3/3) Advantages Disadvantages
  16. 16. Sampling Design D (1/3) Randomly select females who were shopping in the Forest View Shopping Center  Female Shoppers could be selected at random locations at random times of the day, even on randomly selected days of the week  Such shoppers could be personally interviewed on the spot to obtain the desired information. 
  17. 17. Sampling Design D (2/3) Degree of targeting achieved: Geographic and age Shopping behavior, the kinds of shops from where purchase happens can be inferred  Sampling Framework: Mall intercept survey  Sampling method: NonProbabilistic, Judgmental Sampling 
  18. 18. Sampling Design D (3/3) Advantages Disadvantages
  19. 19. Other approaches Web or mail survey Getting a level of geographic targeting would be very difficult 
  20. 20. We Recommend Mall intercept survey Additions:  Remove randomness in the selection of days, location, and time  Select locations and time of day when maximum of the target population would be available  Give some discount coupons as incentives
  21. 21. Thank You!

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