Poster Design
for the K-12 classroom
Dawn Schwartz
Eisenhower Elementary School
Sayreville

Joe Schwartz
Spotswood High Sc...
FIRST STEP…

Make your own poster!
Poster Design Lesson
K-5
ELA Common Core Standards
(Poster Assignment)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy SL.K.5
Add drawings or other visual displays to
descriptio...
ELA Common Core Standards
(Poster Presentation)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy SL.K.2
Confirm understanding of a text read aloud or inf...
Start with the basics!
Show examples
Show examples
Discuss what makes
a good poster
•Original

•Spaced

•Simple

•Neat

•Colorful

•Accurate

•Organized

•Action

•Readable
What should students look at?
Large
letters for
headlines
Colors that
contrast paper –
no yellow on a
light color and
no b...
Try a “Poster Walk”
around your school
Ask what different kinds of
posters you see…

…what do they do?
…how do they look?
http://rubistar.4teachers.org
Poster Design Lesson
6-8
ELA Common Core Standards
(Middle School)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy SL.6.2
Interpret information presented in diverse media
and fo...
History/SS Common Core Standards
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.7
Integrate visual information
(e.g., in charts, graphs, photogr...
In Middle
School, students
start
to learn how to
connect the
dotsthey learned
about in
Elementary
Poster projects
can be used to help
visualize this process.
• musical - rhythmic

• visual - spatial
• verbal - linguistic

• logical - mathematical
• bodily - kinesthetic
• interper...
Start by doing a similar
poster walk of your building.
How are the messages different
than they are for younger
students?
Messages
might be more
complicated
Accompanying
pictures are a
bit more
complex

Mnemonics used for
younger grades
bridge ...
Poster Design Lesson
9-12
ELA Common Core Standards
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.5
Make strategic use of digital media
(e.g., textual, graphical, audi...
History/SSCommon Core Standards
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7
Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information
presen...
Complex
images
and/or
typography

Serious subject
matter

Detailed
Information
Using better tools that
they learned how to use in
Middle School, students are
able to demonstrate
how to visually organiz...
But left alone, they still
make mistakes…
… here was a poster tour
in my hallways:
No yellow type on white paper!
No yellow type on white paper!
No dark type on dark paper!
Don’t clutter it up!
Make it interesting!
Some better examples…
Time to rethink your work!
Thank You!
schwrtzie@verizon.net

jschwartz@design-ed.org
www.design-ed.org
NJEA 2013 presentation
NJEA 2013 presentation
NJEA 2013 presentation
NJEA 2013 presentation
NJEA 2013 presentation
NJEA 2013 presentation
NJEA 2013 presentation
NJEA 2013 presentation
NJEA 2013 presentation
NJEA 2013 presentation
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NJEA 2013 presentation

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Presentation on improving student's poster design projects given to an audience at the 2013 New Jersey Education Association convention in Atlantic City.

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  • JOE“Good afternoon, everyone!Are you sick and tired of giving out poster assignments to your students and having them give you garbagein return?Do you ever think “I can’t give out a poster assignment, I’m not an art teacher”?Well today, we’re here to tell you that you CAN get better results from your students, you CAN show that they are growing in your classroom by having them create posters on a regular basis, and you DON’T need to be an art teacher to do this.I’m Joe Schwartz and I teach Computer Graphics and Design at Spotswood High School. I’m also an adjunct professor of design at Kean University and the cofounder of the DESIGN-ED coalition, an educational nonprofit group. I’m a member of the Art Educators of NJ and would like to thank them for sponsoring our session here today.DAWNAnd I’m Dawn Schwartz. I’ve been an elementary school teacher for about 20 years and have taught kindergarten, second and third grades.POLL THE ROOM – By a show of hands, do we have any elementary school teachers here? Middle School? High school? What are some of your subject areas?(SLIDE)
  • DAWNUsing the materials on the tables before you, and with no instruction from us, we want you to make a poster for something that you know – it can be your subject area, something that you do as a hobby or something that you are interested in personally. But we want you to make it using ONLY the materials that your own students would use.You’ll see that most of the things that you do to create your poster are almost “common sense” and simply need to be made that “AHA!” moment or lesson for your student.We’ll give you 15 minutes to come up with something the best that you can, and we’ll hang the results up on the walls for everyone else to see.(SLIDE)
  • DAWNNow you’ve had a chance to see what your students experience when you give them a poster assignment that isn’t structured or specific and has no instructions from you on how to make it.I’m here today to help you understand how to get a better poster project out of your elementary students, with just some basic steps that everyone can use. The last thing you want is to have one more thing to teach in your already busy day, I know. I was the same way and I got tired just listening to my husband talk about how elementary school teachers should be teaching more design skills in their classes. So, I decided to give it a try just to shut him up. The problem is it worked, I actually enjoy it and I’m not someone who can draw a square with straight lines.(SLIDE)
  • DAWNNow realize that creating successful posters is part of the ELA Common Core Standards – it’s actually two standards. When I have my students make a poster, they are completing the “point 5” standards assigned to the ELA Common Core. In these examples on the screen, you can see how each grade level ups the ante in complexity – but you can also see how a poster fits in really well with the standard.(SLIDE)
  • DAWNMost of the time, it is not enough in my class to just complete a poster. I also have my students present their information to the class. This reinforces the material and shows me they understand what their poster is about. It also completes ELA Common Core under the “point 2” portion of the standards.(SLIDE)
  • DAWNNow, I’m not an expert in any sort of design – and I don’t have to be. By now, I’ve got a pretty good idea of what makes a good poster so my job here today is to simply provide you with an idea about incorporating the basics of poster design into your lessons.(SLIDE)
  • DAWNThe first thing that I do is give my students the handouts that you have before you. There are two versions – one simple and one a bit more complicated. You can choose which one suits your needs better. While they will photocopy well in black and white, you can show the color version in class for a better example.(SLIDE)
  • DAWNMy goal is to make the students more aware of the posters that they see around them every day, but to look at them in a more critical light. We talk about the purpose of posters and why they are created. We talk about the two categories of posters that we’ll see – the posters that convince us to do something and the posters that inform – that teach us something.Then, we discuss what makes a good poster.(SLIDE)
  • DAWNWe use poster examples right in my own classroom – and you can use what’s in your own rooms as well. When we do this we start to look at different aspects of the posters – their color, readability and organization(SLIDE)
  • DAWNWe look at the titles, how capital and lowercase letters are used, how colors are used and basically, we dissect them. What is the title? How do you know? Why does it stand out to you?(SLIDE)
  • DAWNAfter we’ve done this, I take the students on a “poster walk” around the school. This is the fun, kinesthetic part of the lesson – and the kids really get into it.(SLIDE)
  • DAWNIt’s a good idea to break up your lessons – you can do shorter ones all year that focus on specific attributes and revisit what you’ve taught as you review new material ORteach the whole thing – but if you teach the whole lesson on poster design, make sure you do it more than once during the year to reinforce everything.(SLIDE)
  • DAWNThen I bring them back to work on their assignment. You can assign any theme you like – I had the students make a poster on how to be a good citizen in your community.(SLIDE)
  • DAWNDuring my school day, I teach two classes of Social Studies – my own and then I switch with another teacher. For the purpose of this session, I did a little experiment. I gave my class the poster design lesson that we developed. The class from the other teacher got the same assignment, but without a design lesson – the way I taught it before. You can see examples of these lower results here.(SLIDE)
  • DAWNAs you can see, my class came up with some pretty good designs. They really focused on all aspects of the poster, from the pictures to the title and the writing. We’ll have some examples on the tables so you can compare the students who got the poster design lesson and those that did not.(SLIDE)
  • DAWNWhen these projects are graded, I create a rubric that incorporates both Social Studies and some poster design concepts. For the control group that did not get the design lesson, I created a rubric without the “Title” row to make it different and more fair for them.It’s also important to note that by including the poster design instructions about keeping the posters neat, making the pictures match the content, using capital and lowercase letters in an appropriate way, etc., my students more clearly showed an understanding of the lesson and better accomplished the goals of the assignment.I can also justify to parents and administration the grading of the project because A: It is in the standards andB: I taught it and they should be held responsible for it.Before Joe starts his part of the presentation, let’s get everyone up to take a look at the posters that were made earlier.(SLIDE)
  • JOEThese same principles can be applied in a middle school setting.(SLIDE)
  • JOEThe Common Core Standards for English and Language Arts apply in a similar fashion for Middle School students, so your poster assignments for your specific subject areas can still be Common Core compatible.(SLIDE)
  • JOEThe Common Core Standards for English and Language Arts apply in a similar fashion for Middle School students, so your poster assignments for your specific subject areas can still be Common Core compatible.(SLIDE)
  • JOEBecause middle school is the bridge between learning the basics taught in elementary school and the college preparation of high school, it’s with this age group that the students start to connect the dots. They don’t just learn the skills anymore – now they have to start to apply them.(SLIDE)
  • JOEIf you ask a kindergarten class how many of them think they are creative, how many of them will raise their hands? Ask this same question of a high school freshman class, and what kind of a response do you get?So what happens during the “bridge years” of grades 6-8? Do middle school teachers beat the creativity out of their kids? Of course not. But what most likely happens is that while they are trying to figure out all of that dot-connecting, they lose sight of the different approaches to get there. (SLIDE)
  • JOEIn Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences, he stated that being able to express one’s self visually was just as important as any of the other normally accepted forms of intelligence – and that it was one of the forms most likely to be used in conjunction with the others.The inclusion of a visual component to your projects - like a poster – helps those students who aren’t necessarily good writers or speakers, and it helps you to make sure they are getting the point of your lessons. This is why they are included as Common Core standards.(SLIDE)
  • JOEIf you don’t have access to technology in your building, such as a Smartboard, LCD projector connected to an internet-enabled computer, or a document camera, you can take the same kind of poster walk that Dawn suggested. However, you’re going to see a very different selection of posters than you would see in an elementary school setting.(SLIDE)
  • JOEMiddle School students don’t want to be considered to be little kids any more, but they aren’t ready for the complexity of more sophisticated and complex poster messages. This example is typical of a poster in a middle school setting. The changes are slight, but definitely there.(SLIDE)
  • JOELikewise, in their own work you’ll start to see more complicated imagery – overlapping elements, better use of typography, color and textures.(SLIDE)
  • JOEWhile some students may not always succeed at creating a visually powerful poster solution, their ability to organize complex subject matter should start to observable.(SLIDE)
  • (SLIDE)
  • JOEIn High School, there are ELA Common Core Standards and while they are specific to the inclusion of digital media, this isn’t always possible in every district. So, the use of a poster design project may be a good substitute for you to look at.(SLIDE)
  • JOEThere are also History, Social Studies and Science standards that all speak to the use of something like poster design as a part of the learning process.(SLIDE)
  • JOEBy the time these students hit the high schools, the complexity of the images they will be bombarded with is going to be a bit overwhelming. Everywhere they go in the school, they will be hit with messages meant to attract their attention and seduce them into looking closer and paying more attention to the details.(SLIDE)
  • JOEEven waiting on line for lunch will expose the students to visuals that they would have ignored at the younger levels because they would have been too fatigued to consider reading them at that point.(SLIDE)
  • JOEBut not only are students ready to receive these complex images, if the groundwork has been set they will also be ready to create these messages as well. They can build upon the basic design skills that they were exposed to in the lower grades.(SLIDE)
  • JOEBut as you’ll see by these examples that I pulled from around my own school, without instruction on proper poster design the students will eventually slide back to the dark side…(SLIDE)
  • JOEThe cheerleaders in our school “adopt” a senior football player and are responsible for boosting their morale. While well-intentioned,(SLIDE)
  • JOETheir results aren’t always very good and they broke pretty much every law about how to create great graphics.(SLIDE)
  • JOEUgh.(SLIDE)
  • JOEScrapbooking on a locker – yeah.(SLIDE)
  • JOEAs the students get more self-involved in community events and clubs, it especially becomes important for them to understand how to communicate their messages appropriately but in an interesting way. Posters like this are a waste of time – they are ignored because they are misunderstood. What is the point of this poster? Is there a food drive in school? Are they only accepting canned foods? Am I supposed to find my own hungry person and give them a can of gravy? What am I supposed to do? If the point isn’t clear in an instant, the poster is a waste of time, paper and wall space.(SLIDE)
  • JOEThe following examples are from my Computer Graphics and Design classes. Again, while these projects used digital media to be made, some aspects of them could easily be created using traditional art supplies.(SLIDE)
  • JOEThis one is from a level one student project, about six weeks into the marking period.(SLIDE)
  • JOEAs is this one.(SLIDE)
  • JOEAnd this one, from a student I had a few years back with both an IEP and 504 accommodations.(SLIDE)
  • JOEThese examples from level 3 students show that while high school students should beready to organize and create more complex posters, through constant exposure and practice they are also capable of stepping back and creating sophisticated work that is both simple and powerful.(SLIDE)
  • DAWNSo now that you’ve had your own lesson on poster design, we’re going to revisit the assignment we gave you at the beginning of the session and have you make new posters of the exact same subject matter and content. What can you do better now that you have this new knowledge to work with?We’ll give you about 15 minutes and then hang them next to your first posters to compare and contrast the results.(SLIDE)
  • Does anyone have any questions?If you would like a copy of these slides or have any questions you think of later, please feel free to email us at these addresses. You’ll also find these emails at the bottom of the handouts.Likewise, if you would like to learn more about how to incorporate design into your lessons, please visit my nonprofit group and you’ll find links for email blasts, Facebook and Twitter
  • NJEA 2013 presentation

    1. 1. Poster Design for the K-12 classroom Dawn Schwartz Eisenhower Elementary School Sayreville Joe Schwartz Spotswood High School and the DESIGN-ED Coalition
    2. 2. FIRST STEP… Make your own poster!
    3. 3. Poster Design Lesson K-5
    4. 4. ELA Common Core Standards (Poster Assignment) CCSS.ELA-Literacy SL.K.5 Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions as desired to provide additional detail. CCSS.ELA-Literacy SL.3.5 Create engaging audio recordings of stories or poems that demonstrate fluid reading at an understandable pace; add visual displays when appropriate to emphasize or enhance certain facts or details. CCSS.ELA-Literacy SL.5.5 Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, sound) and visual displays in presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.
    5. 5. ELA Common Core Standards (Poster Presentation) CCSS.ELA-Literacy SL.K.2 Confirm understanding of a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media by asking and answering questions about key details and requesting clarification if something is not understood. CCSS.ELA-Literacy SL.3.2 Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. CCSS.ELA-Literacy SL.5.2 Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
    6. 6. Start with the basics!
    7. 7. Show examples
    8. 8. Show examples
    9. 9. Discuss what makes a good poster •Original •Spaced •Simple •Neat •Colorful •Accurate •Organized •Action •Readable
    10. 10. What should students look at? Large letters for headlines Colors that contrast paper – no yellow on a light color and no black over dark colors! If you have a big paragraph, it goes under its picture Capital letters are used for words that have to stand out Simple type Big, bold pictures! Big letters for sub-heads
    11. 11. Try a “Poster Walk” around your school
    12. 12. Ask what different kinds of posters you see… …what do they do? …how do they look?
    13. 13. http://rubistar.4teachers.org
    14. 14. Poster Design Lesson 6-8
    15. 15. ELA Common Core Standards (Middle School) CCSS.ELA-Literacy SL.6.2 Interpret information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how it contributes to a topic, text, or issue under study. CCSS.ELA-Literacy SL.6.5 Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, images, music, sound) and visual displays in presentations to clarify information
    16. 16. History/SS Common Core Standards CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.7 Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts. Science/Tech Common Core Standards CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.7 Integrate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text with a version of that information expressed visually (e.g., in a flowchart, diagram, model, graph, or table).
    17. 17. In Middle School, students start to learn how to connect the dotsthey learned about in Elementary
    18. 18. Poster projects can be used to help visualize this process.
    19. 19. • musical - rhythmic • visual - spatial • verbal - linguistic • logical - mathematical • bodily - kinesthetic • interpersonal • intrapersonal • naturalistic
    20. 20. Start by doing a similar poster walk of your building. How are the messages different than they are for younger students?
    21. 21. Messages might be more complicated Accompanying pictures are a bit more complex Mnemonics used for younger grades bridge the gap between elementary and high school
    22. 22. Poster Design Lesson 9-12
    23. 23. ELA Common Core Standards CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.5 Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
    24. 24. History/SSCommon Core Standards CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem. Science/Tech Common Core Standards CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.11-12.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order to address a question or solve a problem.
    25. 25. Complex images and/or typography Serious subject matter Detailed Information
    26. 26. Using better tools that they learned how to use in Middle School, students are able to demonstrate how to visually organize both academic projects and abstract concepts.
    27. 27. But left alone, they still make mistakes… … here was a poster tour in my hallways:
    28. 28. No yellow type on white paper!
    29. 29. No yellow type on white paper!
    30. 30. No dark type on dark paper!
    31. 31. Don’t clutter it up!
    32. 32. Make it interesting!
    33. 33. Some better examples…
    34. 34. Time to rethink your work!
    35. 35. Thank You! schwrtzie@verizon.net jschwartz@design-ed.org www.design-ed.org

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