Gamification Vs. Game Based Learning

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From Andrew Hughes of Designing Digitally, Inc. For more information see: http://www.designingdigitally.com

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  • Game Thinking - Using a rubric from games to create interactivity and engagement Game Mechanics - The systematic forumals used to create an entertaining and equal advantage game. All games use mechanics; however, theories and styles differ as to their ultimate importance to the game.
  • “ The use of game attributes ,” which includes game mechanics/dynamics, game design principles, gaming psychology, player journey, game play scripts and storytelling, and/or any other aspects of games “ To drive game-like player behavior ,” such as engagement, interaction, addiction, competition, collaboration, awareness, learning, and/or any other observed player behavior during game play “ In a non-game context ,” which can be anything other than a game (e.g. education, work, health and fitness, community participation, civic engagement, volunteerism, etc.)
  • COD even though grosses over 100 million dollars for each release still is not what gamification is! = https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RIec7WQnmK8
  • “ The use of game attributes ,” which includes game mechanics/dynamics, game design principles, gaming psychology, player journey, game play scripts and storytelling, and/or any other aspects of games “ To drive game-like player behavior ,” such as engagement, interaction, addiction, competition, collaboration, awareness, learning, and/or any other observed player behavior during game play “ In a non-game context ,” which can be anything other than a game (e.g. education, work, health and fitness, community participation, civic engagement, volunteerism, etc.)
  • Frequent Flyer miles are the most obvious form of gamification.
  • There are many educational games that teach various subjects in school through game play. As students play these games, they get practice and reinforcement with a particular concept. As a result, they learn and retain the knowledge better.
  • There are many educational games that teach various subjects in school through game play. As students play these games, they get practice and reinforcement with a particular concept. As a result, they learn and retain the knowledge better.
  • Zamzee = http://youtu.be/_EYqR5BvMOs
  • This item uses Game Thinking to Improve specific behaviors and engagement by awarding and recording real-time feedback through the band and through social competitiveness.
  • This item uses Game Thinking to Improve specific behaviors and engagement by awarding and recording real-time feedback through the band and through social competitiveness.
  • Game based learning is used when you have complex systems that are needed to be learned by a student to be able to survive in that environment. For example – Playing baseball
  • http://youtu.be/-pUhraVG7Ow Assassins Creed 3 – Top 10 best selling video game of 2012. Taught me more about the American Revolutionary War than any course in K-12 or Higher Education “ I suspect that gamers rarely believe that they are genuinely learning about the causes or consequences of the specific war through the games,” Sacks said, “but movie-viewers do often believe that they walk out of the theater understanding history when in fact the story has been vastly oversimplified if not outright distorted.” Now, after three years of development, AC III, the largest Assassin’s Creed game yet, allows players to explore colonial locals like New York, Boston, and the American wilderness as Connor, the half-British, half-Native American protagonist. Players will interact with historical figures like George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Charles Lee and Benedict Arnold while participating in famous events such as the Boston Tea Party, Bunker Hill and the iconic Christmas crossing of the Delaware River. “ You will visit these places in the moment that they were important, and hopefully, experience why we know where they are today.” Alex Hutchison, AC III’s creative director, told Gameinformer . “That’s the goal.” Since the game is historical fiction, the revolution is ultimately a set piece within which the continuing Assassin’s Creed story takes place, but the history is an incredibly important aspect of that narrative, one that the design team handled with great care. “ The office tagline is ‘history is our playground,’ and we take it very very seriously,” says Hutchison. “We do a lot of research; we have historical advisors on staff.” The design team put so much care into the historical aspect of the game so that it could be a means for players to experience firsthand and possibly learn about (or reinforce pre-existing knowledge), as accurately as the game’s narrative would allow, colonial life, the nuances of language, the rhetoric, the people, and the way it all ties together. “ We tried to choose moments that were familiar to people, that would resonate, and then a couple of moments that might be new to them, so that we have this balance of something where players can say, ‘oh I know about this, I’ve read about this, it’s really kind of neat to see it from this perspective.’” Corey May, AC III’s lead writer, stated in a “And then other events that may not be as familiar where they can feel like ‘oh I’m learning something new, I’m being exposed to some interesting, new historical information.” So can a game like Assassin’s Creed III really help students explore history? Is there something to be gained by being immersed in a virtual world in which one can experience and interact with the past? Timothy O’Neil, visiting professor of History here at Albion, believes that videogames can certainly have a place in education. “ I believe that video games do indeed excite students about history and encourage them to learn more–for myself, I am certain that playing Dungeons & Dragons as a teenager ultimately turned me into an academic and a historian as an adult,” said O’Neil. “If I taught US history, I would most definitely find some way to use AC III in my classes.” O’Neil cites another educationally-applicable aspect of the game: questioning. Beyond simply immersing players in the past, the Assassin’s Creed franchise is all about challenging the accepted story. These games weave a secondary narrative throughout history that certainly asks players to question the history books.
  • USAFA - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldk-FmCYPCc
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ef_vAih13pU
  • It is game like approach to aesthetics and usability, rather than the addition of game elements. Some may also call it playful design. A nice example of this is the fail whale from Twitter.
  • It is game like approach to aesthetics and usability, rather than the addition of game elements. Some may also call it playful design. A nice example of this is the fail whale from Twitter.
  • When Development a gameful experience it requires that participants experience the spirit of gaming rather than simply the mechanics, in other words that the rewards of playing a game people want to continue playing are intrinsic rather than extrensic .
  • Gamification Vs. Game Based Learning

    1. 1. Gamification vs. Game-based Training Andrew Hughes Designing Digitally, Inc.
    2. 2. http://www.designingdigitally.com 866-316-9126
    3. 3. Who we are • Designing Digitally, Inc. has four major service departments including E-learning, Training Simulations, Serious Games, Virtual Worlds, and Web Development. • Designing Digitally, Inc. was established in 2001 as an interactive media design firm • Designing Digitally, Inc. went incorporated in 2006 and obtained their GSA IT Schedule 70 contract in 2007 • Designing Digitally, Inc. has an A+ rating with the BBB • Designing Digitally, Inc. is a 2012 Business of the Year according to the Franklin Chamber of Commerce. • Designing Digitally, Inc. wins 2012 Federal Virtual Worlds Challenge • 2013 Training Industry’s Top Content Companies Watch List
    4. 4. Gamification • Gamification is the use of game thinking and game mechanics in a non-game context to engage users and solve problems Gamification is used in applications and processes to improve user engagement
    5. 5. What is NOT Gamification?
    6. 6. What is NOT Gamification?
    7. 7. What is NOT Gamification?
    8. 8. What is Gamificiation?
    9. 9. Gamification Example
    10. 10. Gamification Example
    11. 11. Gamification Example
    12. 12. Gamification Example
    13. 13. Gamification Example
    14. 14. Gamification Example
    15. 15. Gamification can be everywhere!
    16. 16. Game Based Learning • Is the use competitive exercises, either pitting the students against each other or getting them to challenge themselves in order to motivate them to learn better. • Motivation • Learn while doing • Playing WITHIN a game
    17. 17. Game Based Learning • Games often have a fantasy element that engages players in a learning activity through a storyline. The learners learn in a cognitive way. • Use of Storylines • Engagement • User Centered Feedback • Immediate Rewards
    18. 18. Game Based Learning
    19. 19. Example of Game Based Learning
    20. 20. Example of Game Based Learning
    21. 21. Example of Game Based Learning
    22. 22. Example of Game Based Learning
    23. 23. Best Practices - Gameful Design • Gameful Design – The use of thinking about the user experience in the game prior to implementation or addition of game elements.
    24. 24. Best Practices - Gameful Design • AKA Playful Design can change behaviors and expectations of users • http://www.whatisfailwhale.info/
    25. 25. Best Practices - Classification
    26. 26. Best Practices – Process? • Play Games! Many genre’s and formats • Learn Game Elements • Think about the learning first then the game • Use the Agile & ADDIE method with Gameful Design and your gaming experience • Develop out detailed storylines • Create multiple endings for outcomes • Play, test, revise, play, test, revise • Repeat the last step 100x
    27. 27. Any Questions?
    28. 28. http://www.designingdigitally.com 866-316-9126 andrew.hughes@designingdigitally.com

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