Blaise Pascal (19 June 1623 – 19 August 1662), was aFrench mathematician,         physicist,     inventor,     writer     ...
family. Étienne, who never remarried, decided that he alone wouldeducate his children, for they all showed extraordinary i...
In 1642, in an effort to ease his fathers endless, exhausting calculations,and recalculations, of taxes owed and paid, Pas...
machines. Calculating machines did not become commercially viableuntil the early 19th century, when Charles Xavier Thomas ...
the development of the theory include Abraham de Moivre andPierre-Simon Laplace.In literature, Pascal is regarded as one o...
Blaise Pascal (19 junio 1623 hasta 19 agosto 1662) fue un matemáticofrancés, físico, inventor, escritor y filósofo católic...
miembro fundamental de la familia. Etienne, que nunca volvió acasarse, decidió que sólo él podría educar a sus hijos, ya q...
Étienne fue perdonado. Con el tiempo Étienne estaba de regreso encongraciarse con el cardenal, y en 1639 había sido nombra...
Pascalines vino en variedades tanto en decimales y no decimales, tantode los que existen en los museos de hoy. El sistema ...
de Pascal (un importante principio de la hidrostática), y como semencionó anteriormente, el triángulo de Pascal y Pascal a...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Blaise pascal

562 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
562
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Blaise pascal

  1. 1. Blaise Pascal (19 June 1623 – 19 August 1662), was aFrench mathematician, physicist, inventor, writer andCatholic philosopher. He was a child prodigy who was educated by hisfather, a tax collector in Rouen. Pascals earliest work was in the naturaland applied sciences where he made important contributions to thestudy of fluids, and clarified the concepts of pressure and vacuum bygeneralizing the work of Evangelista Torricelli. Pascal also wrote indefense of the scientific method.Pascal was an important mathematician, helping create two major newareas of research: he wrote a significant treatise on the subjectofprojective geometry at the age of sixteen, and later correspondedwith Pierre de Fermat onprobability theory, strongly influencing thedevelopment of modern economics and social science.Following Galileo and Torricelli, in 1646 he refuted Aristotles followers whoinsisted that nature abhors a vacuum. Pascals results caused manydisputes before being accepted.In 1646, he and his sister Jacqueline identified with the religiousmovement with in Catholicism known by its detractors as Jansenism.[5] Hisfather died in 1651. Following amystical experience in late 1654, he hadhis "second conversion", abandoned his scientific work, and devotedhimself to philosophy and theology. His two most famous works date fromthis period: the Lettres provinciales and the Pensées, the former set in theconflict between Jansenists and Jesuits. In this year, he also wrote animportant treatise on the arithmetical triangle. Between 1658 and 1659he wrote on the cycloid and its use in calculating the volume of solids.Pascal had poor health especially after his eighteenth year and hisdeath came just two months after his 39th birthday.Early life and education.Pascal was born in Clermont-Ferrand; he lost his mother, AntoinetteBegon, at the age of three.[7] His father, Étienne Pascal (1588–1651), whoalso had an interest in science and mathematics, was a local judge andmember of the "Noblesse de Robe". Pascal had two sisters, theyounger Jacqueline and the elder Gilberte.In 1631, five years after the death of his wife,[8] Étienne Pascal movedwith his children to Paris. The newly arrived family soon hired LouiseDelfault, a maid who eventually became an instrumental member of the
  2. 2. family. Étienne, who never remarried, decided that he alone wouldeducate his children, for they all showed extraordinary intellectual ability,particularly his son Blaise. The young Pascal showed an amazingaptitude for mathematics and science.Particularly of interest to Pascal was a work of Desargues on conicsections. Following Desargues thinking, the sixteen-year-old Pascalproduced, as a means of proof, a short treatise on what was called the"Mystic Hexagram", Essai pour les coniques ("Essay on Conics") and sentit—his first serious work of mathematics—to Père Mersenne in Paris; it isknown still today as Pascals theorem. It states that if a hexagon isinscribed in a circle (or conic) then the three intersection points ofopposite sides lie on a line (called the Pascal line).Pascals work was so precocious that Descartes was convinced thatPascals father had written it. When assured by Mersenne that it was,indeed, the product of the son not the father, Descartes dismissed it witha sniff: "I do not find it strange that he has offered demonstrations aboutconics more appropriate than those of the ancients," adding, "but othermatters related to this subject can be proposed that would scarcelyoccur to a sixteen-year-old child."[9]In France at that time offices and positions could be—and were—bought and sold. In 1631 Étienne sold his position as second president ofthe Cour des Aides for 65,665 livres.[10] The money was invested ina government bond which provided if not a lavish then certainly acomfortable income which allowed the Pascal family to move to, andenjoy, Paris. But in 1638 Richelieu, desperate for money to carry onthe Thirty Years War, defaulted on the governments bonds. SuddenlyÉtienne Pascals worth had dropped from nearly 66,000 livres to less than7,300.Like so many others, Étienne was eventually forced to flee Paris becauseof his opposition to the fiscal policies of Cardinal Richelieu, leaving histhree children in the care of his neighbor Madame Sainctot, a greatbeauty with an infamous past who kept one of the most glittering andintellectual salons in all France. It was only when Jacqueline performedwell in a childrens play with Richelieu in attendance that Étienne waspardoned. In time Étienne was back in good graces with the cardinal,and in 1639 had been appointed the kings commissioner of taxes in thecity of Rouen — a city whose tax records, thanks to uprisings, were inutter chaos.
  3. 3. In 1642, in an effort to ease his fathers endless, exhausting calculations,and recalculations, of taxes owed and paid, Pascal, not yet nineteen,constructed a mechanical calculator capable of addition andsubtraction, called Pascals calculator or the Pascaline. The Musée desArts et Métiers in Paris and theZwinger museum in Dresden, Germany,exhibit two of his original mechanical calculators. Though thesemachines are early forerunners to computer engineering, the calculatorfailed to be a great commercial success. Because it was extraordinarilyexpensive thePascaline became little more than a toy, and statussymbol, for the very rich both in France and throughout Europe.However, Pascal continued to make improvements to his design throughthe next decade and built twenty machines in total.Pascal’s Calculator.Blaise Pascal invented the second mechanical calculator, calledalternatively the Pascalina or the Arithmetique, in 1645, the first beingthat of Wilhelm Schickard in 1623.Pascal began work on his calculator in 1642, when he was only 19 yearsold. He had been assisting his father, who worked as a tax commissioner,and sought to produce a device which could reduce some of hisworkload. Pascal received a Royal Privilege in 1649 that granted himexclusive rights to make and sell calculating machines in France. By 1652Pascal claimed to have produced some fifty prototypes and sold justover a dozen machines, but the cost and complexity of the Pascaline—combined with the fact that it could only add and subtract, and thelatter with difficulty—was a barrier to further sales, and productionceased in that year. By that time Pascal had moved on to other pursuits,initially the study of atmospheric pressure, and later philosophy.Pascalines came in both decimal and non-decimal varieties, both ofwhich exist in museums today. The contemporary French currencysystem was similar to the Imperial pounds ("livres"), shillings ("sols") andpence ("deniers") in use in Britain until the 1970s.In 1799 France changed to a metric system, by which time Pascals basicdesign had inspired other craftsmen, although with a similar lack ofcommercial success. Child prodigy Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz devised acompeting design, the Stepped Reckoner, in 1672 which could performaddition, subtraction, multiplication and division; Leibniz struggled forforty years to perfect his design and produce sufficiently reliable
  4. 4. machines. Calculating machines did not become commercially viableuntil the early 19th century, when Charles Xavier Thomas de ColmarsArithmometer, itself using the key break through of Leibnizs design, wascommercially successful.The initial prototype of the Pascaline had only a few dials, whilst laterproduction variants had eight dials, the latter being able to deal withnumbers up to 9,999,999.The calculator had spoked metal wheel dials, with the digit 0 through 9displayed around the circumference of each wheel. To input a digit, theuser placed a stylus in the corresponding space between the spokes,and turned the dial until a metal stop at the bottom was reached, similarto the way a rotary telephone dial is used. This would display the numberin the boxes at the top of the calculator. Then, one would simply redialthe second number to be added, causing the sum of both numbers toappear in boxes at the top. Since the gears of the calculator onlyrotated in one direction, negative numbers could not be directlysummed. To subtract one number from another, the method of ninescomplements was used. To help the user, when a number was enteredits nines complement appeared in a box above the box containing theoriginal value entered.Legacy.In honor of his scientific contributions, the name Pascal has been givento the SI unit of pressure, to aprogramming language, and Pascalslaw (an important principle of hydrostatics), and as mentioned above,Pascals triangle and Pascals wager still bear his name.Pascals development of probability theory was his most influentialcontribution to mathematics.[27]Originally applied to gambling, today it isextremely important in economics, especially in actuarial science. JohnRoss writes, "Probability theory and the discoveries following it changedthe way we regard uncertainty, risk, decision-making, and an individualsand societys ability to influence the course of future events."[28] However,it should be noted that Pascal and Fermat, though doing important earlywork in probability theory, did not develop the field very far. ChristiaanHuygens, learning of the subject from the correspondence of Pascal andFermat, wrote the first book on the subject. Later figures who continued
  5. 5. the development of the theory include Abraham de Moivre andPierre-Simon Laplace.In literature, Pascal is regarded as one of the most important authors ofthe French Classical Period and is read today as one of the greatestmasters of French prose. His use of satire and wit influencedlater polemicists. The content of his literary work is best remembered forits strong opposition to the rationalism of René Descartes andsimultaneous assertion that the main countervailingphilosophy, empiricism, was also insufficient for determining major truths.
  6. 6. Blaise Pascal (19 junio 1623 hasta 19 agosto 1662) fue un matemáticofrancés, físico, inventor, escritor y filósofo católico. Fue un niño prodigioque fue educado por su padre, un recaudador de impuestos en Ruán.Primera obra de Pascal fue en ciencias naturales y aplicadas dondehizo importantes contribuciones al estudio de los fluidos, y aclaró losconceptos de presión y vacío, generalizando la obra de EvangelistaTorricelli. Pascal escribió en defensa del método científico.Pascal fue un matemático importante, ayudando a crear dos grandesáreas nuevas de investigación: escribió un tratado importante sobre eltema de la geometría proyectiva a la edad de dieciséis años, y mástarde mantuvo correspondencia con Pierre de Fermat en la teoría de laprobabilidad, influyendo fuertemente en el desarrollo de la economíamoderna y ciencias sociales. Después de Galileo y Torricelli, en 1646refutó los seguidores de Aristóteles que insistían en que la naturalezaaborrece el vacío. Los resultados de Pascal causó muchas controversiasantes de ser aceptados.En 1646, él y su hermana Jacqueline se identificaron con el movimientoreligioso en el catolicismo con el conocido por sus detractores como eljansenismo. Su padre murió en 1651. Después de la experiencia a finalesde 1654 amystical, él tenía su "segunda conversión", abandonó sutrabajo científico, y se dedicó a la filosofía y la teología. Sus dos obrasmás famosas datan de este período: Cartas provinciales y los Penséeslas, la primera serie en el conflicto entre jansenistas y los jesuitas. En esteaño, él también escribió un importante tratado sobre el triánguloaritmético. Entre 1658 y 1659 escribió sobre la cicloide y su uso en elcálculo del volumen de los sólidos.Pascal tuvo la mala salud sobre todo después de los dieciocho años y sumuerte se produjo apenas dos meses después de su 39 cumpleaños.Vida y educación tempranas.Pascal nació en Clermont-Ferrand, perdió a su madre, AntoinetteBegon, a la edad de tres años. Su padre, Étienne Pascal (1588-1651),quien también tenía un interés en la ciencia y las matemáticas, era unjuez local y miembro de la "noblesse de robe". Pascal tenía doshermanas, menor Jacqueline y Gilberta la mayor.En 1631, cinco años después de la muerte de su mujer, Étienne Pascal setrasladó con sus hijos a París. La familia recién llegados pronto contratóa Louise Delfault, una criada que eventualmente se convirtió en un
  7. 7. miembro fundamental de la familia. Etienne, que nunca volvió acasarse, decidió que sólo él podría educar a sus hijos, ya que todosmostraron extraordinaria capacidad intelectual, en particular, Blaise suhijo. El joven Pascal demostró una aptitud sorprendente para lasmatemáticas y la ciencia.Especialmente de interés para Pascal era una obra de Desargues sobrelas secciones cónicas. Siguiendo el pensamiento de Desargues, Pascalde dieciséis años de edad, produjo, como un medio de prueba, unbreve tratado sobre lo que se llamó el "Hexagrama Místico", Essai pourles coniques ("Ensayo sobre cónicas") y la envió-su primer un trabajoserio de las matemáticas a Père Mersenne en París, es conocido todavíahoy como el teorema de Pascal. Se establece que si un hexágono seinscribe en un círculo (o cónico), entonces los tres puntos deintersección de los lados opuestos se encuentran en una línea (llamadalínea Pascal).El trabajo de Pascal fue tan precoz que Descartes estaba convencidode que el padre de Pascal lo había escrito. Cuando se aseguró porMersenne que era, de hecho, el producto del hijo no del padre,Descartes rechazó con desdén: "No me parece extraño que se haofrecido demostraciones sobre cónicas más apropiadas que las de losantiguos", y agregó ", pero otros asuntos relacionados con este tema sepuede proponer que difícilmente se le ocurriría a un niño de dieciséisaños de edad."En Francia, en el que las oficinas de tiempo y las posiciones podrían ser-yson-comprados y vendidos. En 1631 Étienne vendió su posición comosegundo presidente de la Cour des Aides de 65,665 libras. El dinero fueinvertido en un bono gubernamental que proporcionan, si no unespléndido entonces, ciertamente, una cómoda renta que permitió a lafamilia a trasladarse a Pascal, y disfrutar, de París. Pero en 1638 Richelieu,desesperada por dinero para llevar a cabo la Guerra de los TreintaAños, incumplió sobre los bonos del gobierno. De pronto, vale la penaÉtienne Pascal se había reducido de cerca de 66.000 libras a menos de7.300.Igual que muchos otros, Étienne se vio obligado a huir de París a causade su oposición a las políticas fiscales del cardenal Richelieu, dejando asus tres hijos al cuidado de su vecino Sainctot , una gran belleza con unpasado infame que mantuvo uno de los más brillantes y salonesintelectuales de toda Francia. Fue entonces cuando Jacqueline sedesempeñó bien en el juego infantil con Richelieu en la asistencia a que
  8. 8. Étienne fue perdonado. Con el tiempo Étienne estaba de regreso encongraciarse con el cardenal, y en 1639 había sido nombradocomisionado del rey de los impuestos en la ciudad de Rouen - unaciudad cuyos registros de impuestos, gracias a los levantamientos, seencontraban en un completo caos.En 1642, en un esfuerzo para facilitar a su padre cálculos interminables yagotadores, y los nuevos cálculos, de los impuestos adeudados ypagados, Pascal, que aún no tenía diecinueve años, construyó unacalculadora mecánica capaz de sumar y restar, llamada la calculadorade Pascal o Pascalina . El Museo de Artes y Oficios de París y el museode Zwinger, en Dresde, Alemania, muestran sus dos calculadorasmecánicas originales. A pesar de que estas máquinas son losprecursores tempranos a la ingeniería informática, la calculadora nologró ser un gran éxito comercial.Porque era extraordinariamente costosas la Pascalina se convirtió enpoco más que un juguete, y símbolo de estatus, para los muy ricos,tanto en Francia como en Europa. Sin embargo, Pascal continuóhaciendo mejoras en su diseño a través de la próxima década yconstruyó veinte máquinas en total.Calculadora de Pascal.Blaise Pascal inventó la segunda calculadora mecánica llamada,alternativamente, la Pascalina, o la arithmétique, en 1645, siendo elprimero de Wilhelm Schickard en 1623.Pascal comenzó a trabajar en su calculadora en 1642, cuando sólotenía 19 años de edad. Había estado ayudando a su padre, quientrabajó como comisionado de impuestos, y trató de producir undispositivo que podría reducir parte de su carga de trabajo. Pascalrecibió un Privilegio Real en 1649 que le otorgó los derechos exclusivospara fabricar y vender calculadoras en Francia. En 1652 Pascal afirmóhaber producido unos cincuenta prototipos y vendió poco más de unadocena de máquinas, pero el costo y la complejidad de la Pascalina,combinada con el hecho de que sólo podía sumar y restar, y este últimocon dificultad-es un obstáculo para seguir las ventas y la produccióncesó en ese año. En ese momento, Pascal había pasado a otrasactividades, inicialmente el estudio de la presión atmosférica, yposteriormente la filosofía .
  9. 9. Pascalines vino en variedades tanto en decimales y no decimales, tantode los que existen en los museos de hoy. El sistema actual de monedafrancesa fue similar a las libras imperiales ("libras"), chelines ("soles") yPence ("negacionistas") en uso en Gran Bretaña hasta la década de1970.En 1799 Francia cambió a un sistema métrico decimal, por lo que eldiseño básico de la época de Pascal había inspirado a otros artesanos,aunque con la misma falta de éxito comercial. Niño prodigio GottfriedWilhelm Leibniz ideó un diseño de competición, el Ajustador de Cuentasescalonado, en 1672, lo que podría realizar sumas, restas, multiplicacióny división; Leibniz luchó durante cuarenta años para perfeccionar sudiseño y producción de suficientemente fiables.Las calculadoras no se convirtieron comercialmente viables hastaprincipios del siglo 19, cuando Arithmometer Charles Xavier Thomas deColmar, en sí misma con la ruptura fundamental a través del diseño deLeibniz, fue un éxito comercial.El prototipo inicial de la Pascalina tenía sólo unos pocos digitos, mientrasque más adelante las variantes de producción con ocho digitos, siendoeste último capaz de lidiar con los números hasta el 9.999.999.La calculadora tenía digitos de ruedas metálicas, con el dígito 0 a 9aparecen alrededor de la circunferencia de cada rueda. A la entradade un dígito, el usuario coloca una aguja en el espacio correspondienteentre los radios, y convertido el disco hasta un tope metálico en la parteinferior se logró, similar a la forma en que se utiliza un teléfono rotatorio.Esto muestra el número en las cajas en la parte superior de lacalculadora. Entonces, uno simplemente marcar el segundo númeroque se añade, haciendo la suma de ambos números para aparecer encuadros de la parte superior. Dado que los engranajes de lacalculadora sólo giraban en una dirección, los números negativos nopodrían estar directamente resumidos. Para restar un número de otro, elmétodo de nueves complementa fue utilizado. Para ayudar al usuario,cuando un número se ha introducido el complemento de sus nuevesaparecía en un cuadro encima del cuadro que contiene el valororiginal introducido.Legado.En honor a sus contribuciones científicas, el nombre de Pascal se hadado a la unidad SI de presión, a un lenguaje de programación, y la ley
  10. 10. de Pascal (un importante principio de la hidrostática), y como semencionó anteriormente, el triángulo de Pascal y Pascal apuestatodavía llevan su nombre .El desarrollo de Pascal de la teoría de la probabilidad fue sucontribución más influyente para las matemáticas. Originalmente seaplica a los juegos de azar, hoy en día es muy importante en laeconomía, especialmente en la ciencia actuarial. John Ross escribe: "Lateoría de probabilidades y de los descubrimientos después de quecambió la forma en que consideramos la incertidumbre, el riesgo, latoma de decisiones, y un individuo y la capacidad de la sociedad parainfluir en el curso de los acontecimientos futuros." Sin embargo, debeseñalarse que Pascal y Fermat, aunque hacieron un trabajo importantea principios de la teoría de probabilidades, no se desarrolló el campomuy lejos. Christiaan Huygens, el aprendizaje de la asignatura de lacorrespondencia de Pascal y Fermat, escribió el primer libro sobre eltema. Más tarde, las figuras que continuaron el desarrollo de la teoría deAbraham de Moivre incluyen a Pierre-Simon Laplace.En la literatura, Pascal es considerado como uno de los autores másimportantes del período clásico francés y es leído hoy en día como unode los más grandes maestros de la prosa francesa. Su uso de la sátira yel ingenio de influencia polemistas posteriores. El contenido de su obraliteraria es más recordado por su fuerte oposición al racionalismo deRené Descartes y la afirmación simultánea de la filosofía principalcontrapeso, el empirismo, también era insuficiente para determinarverdades importantes.

×