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Accessible design: which everyone do you mean? CSUN 2015

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Originally presented at OpenWebCamp 6 in 2014 and then again (shortened) at CSUN 2015.

When you design for everyone, do you really mean everyone, or do you actually STILL mean that you're designing for people like you? Do you still mean the Western world? Do you still mean building for screen reader users?

For many of my early years as a web developer, I called what I created accessible, but in many ways, I meant screen reader compatible. Through working with different people with disabilities and different assistive technologies, you'll learn new things that don't have anything to do with guidelines, rules, or success criteria. And that's okay -- those rules and success criteria are an incredible starting point. But they aren't our end point. Not if we truly mean "everyone."

In this session we'll look at designing for audiences other than screen readers. In fact, you'll hear NOTHING about screen reader accessibility in this talk. You'll hear about other audiences: people with mobility or dexterity impairments, low-vision, and even different literacy or cultural differences. You'll learn several practical takeaways to help you design and build things that go beyond screen reader compatible.

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Accessible design: which everyone do you mean? CSUN 2015

  1. 1. Accessible Design: Which everyone do you mean? @feather #csun2015
  2. 2. Derek Featherstone
 
 feather@simplyaccessible.com @feather
  3. 3. Accessible Design: Which everyone do you mean?
  4. 4. What does diversity even mean?
  5. 5. What about ability? expertise?
  6. 6. • blind • low-vision • hearing • mobility/dexterity (fine motor control, low- strength, single- handedness) • cognitive (attention, memory-related, literacy, routines/predictability) • vestibular issues • speech
  7. 7. 3 types of relationships
  8. 8. 1 2 3 Explicit, implicit and content based relationships.
  9. 9. Low-vision challenges
  10. 10. Windows High Contrast Mode: background images disappear.
  11. 11. Low-vision tip: review your interfaces in High Contrast Mode to look for loss of functionality or meaning.
  12. 12. Group closely related items.
  13. 13. PRINCIPLE OF PROXIMITY
 Related items should be together.
  14. 14. Check In 1. Are you a U.S. citizen? 2. Have you ever been denied entry to the U.S.? Yes No Yes No 3. Do you have a TSA Redress Number? 4. If yes, please enter it: Yes No Quit << Previous Next >> Layout:
 Consider proximity, pattern of use for low-vision
  15. 15. Check In 1. Are you a U.S. citizen? 2. Have you ever been denied entry to the U.S.? Yes No Yes No 3. Do you have a TSA Redress Number? 4. If yes, please enter it: Yes No Quit << Previous Next >>
  16. 16. Check In 1. Are you a U.S. citizen? 2. Have you ever been denied entry to the U.S.? Yes No Yes No 3. Do you have a TSA Redress Number? 4. If yes, please enter it: Yes No Quit or Go Back Next >> Not sure? Use layout to create the right chunks.
 Use pattern of use to lead the eye to action.
  17. 17. Examine your interfaces using the straw test to unearth layout and design challenges for people with low-vision.
  18. 18. Mobility and dexterity challenges
  19. 19. To help ensure accessibility, provide multiple means to achieve the same goal.
  20. 20. Cognitive challenges
  21. 21. Wants pawn term, dare worsted ladle gull hoe lift wetter murder inner ladle cordage, honor itch offer lodge, dock florist. Disk ladle gull orphan worry putty ladle rat cluck wetter ladle rat hut, an fur disk raisin pimple colder ladle rat rotten hut.
  22. 22. Once upon a time, there was a little girl who
 lived with her mother in a little cottage, on the edge of a large, dark forest. This little girl
 often wore a pretty little red cloak with her little red hat, and for this reason people called her Little Red Riding Hood.
  23. 23. What’s the impact of aging on what we do?
  24. 24. What’s the impact of culture on what we do?
  25. 25. Edward T. Hall Beyond Culture
 high and low context cultures
  26. 26. High Context Culture Low Context Culture collectivist individualist group empowerment self empowerment authoritarian style information delivery exploratory accuracy valued over speed speed valued over accuracy context is implied based on being in that culture context is explicit and self contained Of course, this is a continuum and not a dichotomy.
  27. 27. Accessible Design: Which everyone do you mean? @feather #csun2015
  28. 28. Derek Featherstone
 
 feather@simplyaccessible.com @feather

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