Beyond the Quotation Marks<br />Preventing Plagiarism and Teaching about Academic Discourse<br />“The ‘Library’,” Quinn Do...
Which best describes you?<br />Faculty Member<br />Grad Student or Post-Doc<br />Undergraduate Student<br />Staff or Admin...
Which best describes the field in which you teach?<br />Humanities<br />Social Sciences<br />Natural Sciences or Engineeri...
While writing a paper on homelessness, you copy and paste some text from a website’s FAQ page. You don’t cite your source ...
“At Rhode Island College, a freshman copied and pasted from a Web site’s frequently asked questions page about homelessnes...
While writing a paper on the Great Depression, you paraphrase a few paragraphs you found on Wikipedia. You don’t cite your...
“Students should understand that sources of common knowledge can be plagiarized. Copying or close paraphrasing of the word...
German teenager Helene Hegemann’s best-selling novel about Berlin club life included several passages lifted from other no...
“Instead of offering an abject apology, Ms. Hegemann insisted, ‘There’s no such thing as originality anyway, just authenti...
http://mashupbreakdown.com/<br />
Girl Talk’s 2011 album All Day consists entirely of samples of other songs, 372 samples in all.<br />Plagiarism<br />Not P...
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Beyond the Quotation Marks

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A few clicker questions on plagiarism for a workshop for faculty on preventing plagiarism

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  • Handle logistics—sign-in, follow-up survey, podcast.Introduce the session and its format. Read the questions you identified in the workshop description:How can we effectively educate our students about plagiarism?What steps can we take to help students understand the nature of academic discourse and academic norms about working with sources?What kinds of assignments and resources we can provide that reduce our students’ motivation and ability to plagiarize?”Note the emphasis on practical strategies for instructors, but also the emphasis on preventing plagiarism by teaching students about the nature of academic discourse.Show today’s blog post exploring reasons why students cheat, which are on-topic for today’s discussion. Click through to show the teaching guide with additional resources.
  • First, let’s find out a bit about who’s in the room.
  • Results from my first-year writing seminar: 93% plagiarism, 7% not
  • From that NYT article: “And at the University of Maryland, a student reprimanded for copying from Wikipedia in a paper on the Great Depression said he thought its entries — unsigned and collectively written — did not need to be credited since they counted, essentially, as common knowledge. “Results from my first-year writing seminar: 80% plagiarism, 20% not
  • Results from my first-year writing seminar: 100% plagiarism, 0% not
  • Beyond the Quotation Marks

    1. 1. Beyond the Quotation Marks<br />Preventing Plagiarism and Teaching about Academic Discourse<br />“The ‘Library’,” Quinn Dombrowski, Flickr (CC)<br />
    2. 2. Which best describes you?<br />Faculty Member<br />Grad Student or Post-Doc<br />Undergraduate Student<br />Staff or Administrator<br />15 of 40<br />
    3. 3. Which best describes the field in which you teach?<br />Humanities<br />Social Sciences<br />Natural Sciences or Engineering<br />10 of 40<br />
    4. 4. While writing a paper on homelessness, you copy and paste some text from a website’s FAQ page. You don’t cite your source because the page doesn’t include author information.<br />Plagiarism<br />Not Plagiarism<br />
    5. 5. “At Rhode Island College, a freshman copied and pasted from a Web site’s frequently asked questions page about homelessness — and did not think he needed to credit a source in his assignment because the page did not include author information.”<br />Trip Gabriel, “Plagiarism Lines Blur for Students in Digital Age,” New York Times, August 1, 2010<br />
    6. 6. While writing a paper on the Great Depression, you paraphrase a few paragraphs you found on Wikipedia. You don’t cite your source because information on Wikipedia can be considered common knowledge.<br />Plagiarism<br />Not Plagiarism<br />
    7. 7. “Students should understand that sources of common knowledge can be plagiarized. Copying or close paraphrasing of the wording or presentation of a source of common knowledge constitutes plagiarism.” <br />Vanderbilt University Student Handbook, “The Honor System”<br />The Wikipedia example was also cited in that New York Times article!<br />
    8. 8. German teenager Helene Hegemann’s best-selling novel about Berlin club life included several passages lifted from other novels.<br />Plagiarism<br />Not Plagiarism<br />
    9. 9. “Instead of offering an abject apology, Ms. Hegemann insisted, ‘There’s no such thing as originality anyway, just authenticity.’ A few critics rose to her defense, and the book remained a finalist for a fiction prize (but did not win).”<br />Trip Gabriel, “Plagiarism Lines Blur for Students in Digital Age,” New York Times, August 1, 2010<br />
    10. 10. http://mashupbreakdown.com/<br />
    11. 11. Girl Talk’s 2011 album All Day consists entirely of samples of other songs, 372 samples in all.<br />Plagiarism<br />Not Plagiarism<br />

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