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Communications Strategy in the Era of Accountability

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This covers the evolving need for marketing communications to deliver on both ubsines and advertising objectives and how to approach this today when brand owners are demanding more

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Communications Strategy in the Era of Accountability

  1. 1. Communications Strategy in the Era of Accountability Adeola Kayode
  2. 2. Adeola Kayode Digital Strategy, Insight Publicis Author: Digital Epidemic: Strategic eMarketing Guide to Growing your Business in the Age of Connected Customers
  3. 3. 1. Prelude
  4. 4. They just don’t get me! Conversations with 3 Brand Managers
  5. 5. When your client knows more, able to do more, work faster or cheaper than you; you will soon be out of business. 1
  6. 6. Today; it is not the big that eat the small; it is the fast that eat the slow. Inflation hasn’t affected Speed yet. It remains a Competitive Advantage. 2
  7. 7. 2. IPA effectiveness
  8. 8. Context: "Marketing in the Era of Accountability" outlines an analysis of data, based on a sample of 880 case studies  By Les Binet - European Director, DDB Matrix and Marketing Consultant, Peter Field  Under the platform of The Institute of Practitioners in Advertising (IPA),  UK’s professional institute for agencies covering advertising, media and marketing communications industry. The role of the IPA is to promote the value of media, marketing and advertising agencies.  The IPA Awards is the most rigorous effectiveness awards scheme designed to narrow the gap practice and best practice by identifying the key drivers of effectiveness.  It focuses on the pursuit of profitability, not the winning of prizes.
  9. 9. Context: The research covered the following areas 1. Introduction 2. Briefing 3. Budget setting 4. Communication Strategy 5. Media Strategy 6. Measurement 7. Payback and Remuneration
  10. 10. Emotional Involvement Fame Information Persuasion Reinforcement More Complex
  11. 11. Emotional Involvement Fame Information Touching emotions and feeling in consumers by generating emotional engagement with the campaign Transfer emotions to brand by using empathy to influence choice Getting the brand talked about by making it famous Brand stands out distinctively from others in the category Encourage brand usage by creating a perception of a bigger and stronger brand Avoids emotional tools and NFP Government campaigns Providing information related to brand usage Includes a classic reason why. Classical and purely logical rationale Highlight functional benefit over others eg. fastest
  12. 12. Persuasion Reinforcement More Complex Generate interest with information or news and then adding an emotional element for persuasion Challenge / enhance existing knowledge or behavior about the brand Emotional content is low and process of persuasion is rational Seeks to reinforce existing behavior rather than change it Aimed at increasing loyalty through increased frequency and weight of brand usage Focus on usage occasions, usage modes, strength between brand and associated events A combination of 2/more behavior rather than change it Aimed at increasing loyalty through increased frequency and weight of brand usage Focus on usage occasions, usage modes, strength between brand and associated events
  13. 13. More Complex: Principally Emotional 17% Principally Rational 12% Emotional and Rational 71% Persuasion Reinforcement Fame Emotional involvement
  14. 14. Findings 1: Emotionally-based influence models are more effective Communications models that use emotional appeal (emotional appeal and more complex models) are more likely to yield more business results than rationally based models (information and persuasion).
  15. 15. Findings 2: Emotional campaigns generate more business effects It out performs on all business measure [ Sales, Market Share, Profit, Penetration, Loyalty, Price Sensitivity]. Fame campaigns also perform creditably close because of greater effectiveness and accountability. Reinforcement campaigns are the least profitable of all.
  16. 16. Findings 3: Emotional based campaigns generate more numerous immediate effects It out performs on almost all intermediate effects [ Brand Awareness, Brand Commitment, Brand Fame, Brand Differentiation, Quality Perceptions, Brand Image, Brand Trust].
  17. 17. Findings 4: Emotional based campaigns are more memorable While rational campaigns are more effective (by small margin) in directly influencing consumer behaviour in short term behavioural responses, Emotional campaigns play a major role in the commercial success by being more memorable in the long run by having a stronger impact in memory formation and durable memories.
  18. 18. Findings 5: Rational based campaigns are better at (short-term) direct effects with consumers While rational campaigns are more effective because the required consumer behaviour is rather immediate (calls, sales, website visits etc) or short order (try new uses of a product). Only requires the stimulus and does not require long term memory formulation.
  19. 19. Findings 6: Different Strategies for different contexts Emotional campaigns exert a greater influence on brand choice and are more memorable than rational campaigns. Cumulative effect is stronger than rational campaigns. Emotional campaign are more effective for premium brands. (of course, premium brands need emotional support/attributes than non-premium brands to justify their premium positioning)
  20. 20. Findings 7: Premium brands need more emotional support Emotional campaigns are more effective for premium brands. Premium brands need the support of emotional attributes than non-premium brands as a way to justify their premium position within the category.
  21. 21. Findings 8: Emotional Campaigns work during buoyant times Emotional campaigns are more effective during buoyant market conditions. During this time, consumers are less focused on price and value messages. Tough times seem to demand a more complex approach, mixing emotional and rational tactics (e. g. mixing brand messages with price or promotional messages)
  22. 22. Findings 9: Emotional Campaigns become more important as categories mature Especially, in declining categories. They tend to be characterized by low functional differentiation and narrow profit margins ( making price competition less effective). In this category, brand growth is much more likely fueled by emotional messaging.
  23. 23. Findings 10: Emotions and fame work best for smaller brands Emotional involvement is effective for most brands, but becomes particularly important for smaller ones. On the other hand, brand leaders are one group that actually benefit from a more rational approach, presumably because economies of scale give them more advantages in terms of product and price that they can talk about.
  24. 24. Findings 11: Rational approaches work best for direct response Direct behavioural response is one area where rational approaches seem to be more effective than emotional ones. Direct response requires short term effect and superior memorability of emotional messages carries no advantages. It also requires direct activity tending to target consumers actively shopping for a product. Active shoppers tend to demand more detailed information.
  25. 25. Findings 12: Rational approaches work best for direct response Direct behavioural response is one area where rational approaches seem to be more effective than emotional ones. Direct response requires short term effect and superior memorability of emotional messages carries no advantages. It also requires direct activity tending to target consumers actively shopping for a product. Active shoppers tend to demand more detailed information.
  26. 26. Findings 12: Creative styles are similarly effective While there was a difference in the communication strategies. Creative TV styles did not have a remarkble difference. Sex as a creative tool was effective but not so much significantly. There was also not so much different effects between live action and animation. The use of humor or celebrities appeared to have nothing to do with the effectiveness of the advert. Testimonial had the only significant difference and it was less effective . Clear conclusion: Keep an open mind.
  27. 27. Summary Findings: i. Aim to change behaviour rather than reinforce existing behaviour ii. Emotional approaches generally work better than rational ones regardless on category though the immediate effects (eg. Brand health) are not always easy to measure iii. Fame model is the most emotional strategy of all iv. Emotional approaches work well in mature markets. Products in younger markets are more differentiated, favouring a mix of emotions and information v. Emotional approaches work better for premium brands as a way of justifying premium. Value brands are a mixed approach vi. Emotions work best when markets are buoyant. In tough times price becomes an important factor. Therefore a balance of emotive brand and price communications. vii. Direct response requires a more rational approach
  28. 28. Caveat: i. Research done in 2008 (2 years before Instagram, 2 years after Twitter were founded) ii. Local relevance: Nuance, culture and values iii. Recession: How does that impact accountability?
  29. 29. How do we then approach this ?
  30. 30. Just 3 things: The Brief The Execution The Strategy & the message
  31. 31. The Brief Three classes of briefs;  Client Briefs  Project briefs  Proactive briefs The Brief:
  32. 32. BUSINESS OBJECTIVE BRAND/ MARKETING OBJECTIVE QUARTERLY OBJECTIVE CAMPAIGN OBJECTIVE / BRIEF Client Briefs Project Briefs Proactive Briefs Normal Agency response Commoditized market Proactive Agency response Consulting model Management buy-in Here is where the money is
  33. 33. Strategy & Message: The Strategy & the message Who owns strategy? The Strategic Planner or the Creative Strategist?
  34. 34. Comparison is the thief of joy—and of creativity
  35. 35. CREATIVE STRATEGIC PLANNING
  36. 36. By collaborating, we open our minds to input from people who see the world a bit differently. Account Management Strategy Creative
  37. 37. Tales from: 1. DDB Tribal : Conversations 2. The Formerly: The experimentalists 3. Anomaly: The builders 4. The zoo keepers Netherlands The Perfect Brief Google HQ in Amsterdam
  38. 38. The Strategy & the message The Objectives The Audience The Insight & The Message The Resources And The Channels The Action Plan
  39. 39. Ran Neu Ner The Creative Cousel Find a way in One single message Get noticed Get into the heart Stay in the Heart Talk to the heart Tell human stories Real relationships Individual>influencer >impact Fight for a cause together Cause Marketing
  40. 40. Aim for the heart and the heart will justify it to the head 3
  41. 41. The Execution: the discipline of getting things done The Execution
  42. 42. Culture eats Strategy for Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner – every time
  43. 43. Culture is back on the corporate agenda. As leaders deal with the demands of increased complexity …. Many recognize the momentum that comes with a responsive and energized culture. Art Kleiner & Rutger Von Post
  44. 44. “Leaders may try to ignore their culture and act as if it isn’t important. But when overlooked, the hidden power of a company’s culture can thwart any leader’s strategic aspirations. No matter how many top-down directives you issue, they will rarely be executed, at least not with the emotional commitment and consistency needed to make them successful.”…….. "If the culture opposes strategy...the results can be disastrous. Jon katzenbach & Ashley Harshak; Booz & Co Stop blaming Culture. Strategy + Culture Issue 62 Spring 2011
  45. 45. I was not the lion, but it fell to me to give the lion’s roar. -Winston Churchill
  46. 46. We’ve got this!
  47. 47. Thank you! Challenge. Comments. Concerns . Questions .

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