Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
SCHOOL of DENTISTRY

                    DOCTOR of DENTAL SURGERY
                            BACHELOR of SCIENCE IN DENTA...
Table of Contents

A Tradition of Pioneers                            2
Overview of the School                            ...
On behalf of our students, staff and faculty,
                                                     I am pleased to learn o...
In 1888, Edith H. White set aside her love for
                                                                           ...
“There are a variety of different
                                                                                 backgro...
Clinic, located 200 miles north of the Twin
                                                                              ...
“The Center for Contemporary Dentistry
                                                                       places Minne...
profession. Career planning is integrated into            Advanced clinical specialty training programs
                  ...
defects. A head and facial pain clinic evaluates
                                                          and treats pati...
Access to Student Educational Records—In                     Student Services
                            accordance with ...
“You can treat patients in Australia,
                                                                                lobb...
committees or apply for national positions or              Fraternities and Honor Societies
                           ext...
Students can participate in the following:

Hibbing Community College Dental Clinic:
In 2002, the School of Dentistry laun...
Dental hygienists practice in a variety of settings
                                                                      ...
“If you want real-world learning—
    alongside dental students and
    faculty—you come here.”
                          ...
English proficiency: Applicants who are not                  Information for Accepted Applicants
                         ...
Curriculum                                                  Spring Semester
                                              ...
Dental Hygiene (DH)                                                        DH 3123. The Dental Hygiene Care Process Clinic...
DH 3227. Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology Clinic II. (0 cr; A-F only.
Prereq-DH student)                                  ...
Shirley Burgen Lichtwardt Memorial
                                                                                       ...
SCHOOL of DENTISTRY
SCHOOL of DENTISTRY
SCHOOL of DENTISTRY
SCHOOL of DENTISTRY
SCHOOL of DENTISTRY
SCHOOL of DENTISTRY
SCHOOL of DENTISTRY
SCHOOL of DENTISTRY
SCHOOL of DENTISTRY
SCHOOL of DENTISTRY
SCHOOL of DENTISTRY
SCHOOL of DENTISTRY
SCHOOL of DENTISTRY
SCHOOL of DENTISTRY
SCHOOL of DENTISTRY
SCHOOL of DENTISTRY
SCHOOL of DENTISTRY
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

SCHOOL of DENTISTRY

4,178 views

Published on

  • Manufacturer and supplier of high quality stainless steel Dental Instruments for Studants and Professionals as per Requirments.

    Call: 0092 323 8661002
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

SCHOOL of DENTISTRY

  1. 1. SCHOOL of DENTISTRY DOCTOR of DENTAL SURGERY BACHELOR of SCIENCE IN DENTAL HYGIENE 2006 – 08 CATALOG
  2. 2. Table of Contents A Tradition of Pioneers 2 Overview of the School 5 Student Life 9 Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene 12 Doctor of Dental Surgery 20 The University of Minnesota and the Twin Cities 31 Quick Facts 32 Resource Guide 33 Index 35
  3. 3. On behalf of our students, staff and faculty, I am pleased to learn of your interest in the dental profession and the University A Letter from the Dean of Minnesota School of Dentistry. With the unprecedented level of dental treatment needs in our society, the confidence and trust the public has for our judgments, and the availability of some amazing technologies, I contend that there has never been a better time to enter our profession. As one of the outstanding dental schools in the world, we are committed to: • Graduating dental professionals who provide the highest quality of care and service to the people of Minnesota and the world; • Discovering new knowledge through research, which will inspire innovation in the biomedical, behavioral and clinical sciences; • Providing oral health care to a diverse patient population in a variety of settings; and • Providing objective, evidence-based clinical and independent learning experiences for dental professionals. Our students enjoy a challenging clinical education in a supportive environment that is rich with opportunities for professional growth and community involvement. We are proud of our school and our reputation for excellence, and invite you to explore more fully the opportunities we offer. Patrick M. Lloyd, D.D.S., M.S. Dean The University of Minnesota is chartered. In 1858, Minnesota becomes the 32nd state in the union. The University closes from 1861 through 1867 for the Civil War. 85
  4. 4. In 1888, Edith H. White set aside her love for travel, fencing and mountain climbing to join 21 young colleagues at the University of A Tradition of Pioneers Minnesota College of Dentistry. They were the first class at a new dental school, and a faculty of four taught these inaugural students how to run a dental engine with a foot pedal, how to make their own lab and clinical instruments and Dr. Edith H. White, how to protect the oral health of future patients. When the new dentists graduated three years seen here in fencing later and launched their practices—some in attire, was the first Midwestern hometowns and others as far away woman graduate of the as Alaska’s Yukon Territory, where Edith White followed the gold rush—they were hailed not University of Minnesota only as health care experts with valued skills, but College of Dentistry. also as true pioneers. That leadership tradition still thrives at the School of Dentistry. The dental hygiene baccalaureate program is the only dental hygiene program in the state that offers a baccalaureate degree and is associated with a dental school. The faculty is known throughout the world for significant contributions to ongoing dental research and technology. And although today’s students no longer make their own instruments, they remain pioneers— in research, in education, in clinical services, in outreach and in excellence. Pioneering Through Research Were Edith White in today’s class, she would not have to navigate the Yukon to find excitement. Exploring current research would offer adventure enough. The School of Dentistry has pioneered research in pain control, fluoridation, microbiology and disease prevention. In 1990, a $2.5 million National Institutes of Health grant helped launch the Oral Health Clinical Research Center, one of only four U.S. centers funded to transfer research and technology advances into clinical areas to enhance diagnosis, prevention and treatment of oral diseases. The School is also a world leader in cancer pain research, discoveries that link oral disease with St. Joseph’s Oil sells for 50 cents and promises relief from toothaches, sprains, frostbite and quinsy. An ad for Smith’s Bile Beans promised to purify the blood by “acting directly and promptly on the Liver, Skin and Kidneys.” 880
  5. 5. “There are a variety of different backgrounds, but you still get that small school feeling.” Kirsten Enget Third-Year Dental Student heart disease, and knowledge about molecular communication, practice management, clinical motors and how DNA is packaged into viruses. experiences and business skills. The Minnesota Center for Biomaterials and Students pursuing advanced training can choose Biomechanics, which works closely with 11 clinical specialty or special focus areas, manufacturers to develop new dental products including clinical research, oral biology and and materials, has contributed major innovations public health. Master’s and Ph.D. programs, to the field. The Virtual Dental Patient, a offered in conjunction with the University of computerized imaging program capable of Minnesota Graduate School, prepare general predicting a patient’s oral health problems, is dentists, specialists, and dental hygienists one example. Another is an artificial mouth that for academic, research and administration duplicates one year of chewing in a single day. careers. Graduates of dental schools outside Invaluable technology for testing the durability of the United States and Canada train here, as of dental materials, this unique invention earned well. And a five-year award from the National display rights at the Smithsonian Institution in Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Faculty members Washington, D.C. provides generous support for a Dentist- are skilled dentists, Scientist Training Program (D.D.S./Ph.D. clinicians, scientists Choosing the Best, degree). Then Training Them Well and researchers. Dental equipment has changed—a lot—since But where you are Dental students at the School of Dentistry rank 1888. The School’s Center for Contemporary high in their undergraduate classes, with an concerned, they are Dentistry is a state-of-the-art dental clinic that overall 3.63 grade point average. Nationally, features cutting-edge technology. Generous teachers first. You get their Dental Admission Test scores are among support from Patterson Dental Supply, Inc. the personal attention the highest. Students accepted into the bachelor ensures that the clinic is equipped with the latest of science dental hygiene program are also you need. innovations. among the best and brightest, and pursue teaching and research as well as clinical careers. The School of Dentistry trains nearly 80 percent of Minnesota’s dentists and a majority of those The days of Edith White’s three-year dentistry in neighboring states. Yet graduates also pursue program, however, are long gone. Today the careers as far away as Madagascar and Peru. four-year D.D.S. program, which typically Their education is ongoing; more than 5,000 follows four years of undergraduate classes, dentists and dental hygienists return to the features diverse courses in basic, clinical and School of Dentistry each year and select from behavioral sciences, as well as interpersonal more than 100 continuing education programs. University of Minnesota College of Dentistry is founded as a division of the Department of Medicine. Started with four professors, the College is the 8th university-based dental school in the U.S. Dr. Gainsford Ridgeway is the School’s first graduate. 888
  6. 6. Clinic, located 200 miles north of the Twin Cities on the campus of the Hibbing Community College, and they treat patients in metropolitan and out-state communities aboard a three-chair mobile dental clinic. The School of Dentistry has also exchanged students and faculty with countries throughout the world since 1921. By the 1980s, these teaching, research and consulting experiences had touched 88 countries, from Australia to Tobago. Faculty and students have provided dental care to a vast array of international Our work affects Reaching Out to Support patients, from Republic of Malagasy villagers virtually every person in Communities to Vietnamese refugees to members of the royal family in Qatar (where the palace dental clinic Minnesota. We educate Edith White and her classmates gained part of boasts Persian rugs and Italian marble walls). their clinical experience by dispensing free care nearly 80 percent of in a building on Seven Corners in Minneapolis, the state’s practicing near their school. That community outreach Launching Leaders tradition not only continues, it has expanded Like Edith White, whose career took her dentists, 58 percent of beyond city and county borders. from Minneapolis to Chicago to Alaska, those its practicing dental who choose a career in dentistry can expect specialists and Today, School of Dentistry students treat a challenging and rewarding future. An aging patients in on-site clinics—more than 100,000 population, changing patterns of dental care and 49 percent of its dental patient visits annually—where they provide an expanding health care sector point to a strong hygiene educators. general dental and dental hygiene services, as demand for dentists and dental hygienists in the well as pediatric and geriatric dental services next 10 to 15 years. Research and technology (the geriatric dentistry training program is the advances promise that tomorrow’s dentists and nation’s first). dental hygienists will deliver a wider range of dental and dental hygiene services than ever The School also provides a full range of before. specialty services, including orthodontic, endodontic, periodontic, oral diagnosis/ Many dentists and dental hygienists work in radiology, oral pathology, prosthodontic, and private or group practices. Excellent career oral and maxillofacial surgery. Patients with opportunities also exist in teaching and research, special needs also visit clinics that work with in government agencies, or in industry. cleft lips and palates, facial dental anomalies, smoking cessation, temporomandibular joint/ As the face of dentistry across the country chronic facial pain, and dental implants. continues to grow and change, so, too, must the way in which dental schools teach and students Dental and dental hygiene students also enhance learn. The pioneering tradition that has served their skills in community-based service learning the School of Dentistry since 1888, and led to programs. At the Union Gospel Mission in St. outstanding performance in research, education Paul, the low-income and homeless receive free and community service, is not just important services. Students treat patients at two inner- to the future of today’s aspiring dental health city clinics and five Twin Cities nursing homes. care providers. Like the leaders it launches, it is They travel to the School’s Hibbing Dental essential. Gophers play their first football game against Wisconsin and win 6-0. At the intramural level, the “Dents” and “Medics” compete fiercely to defend the honor of their respective schools. 890
  7. 7. “The Center for Contemporary Dentistry places Minnesota on the cutting edge of contemporary dental education.” Dr. Dan Skaar Interim Chair Department of Primary Dental Care The Center for Overview of the The School of Dentistry is part of the health sciences complex on the University of Contemporary Dentistry is a state-of-the-art School of Dentistry Minnesota’s Minneapolis campus. Its main offices, classrooms, clinics, laboratories, reading restorative clinic. and resource rooms are located in the Malcolm Vision: We set the standard in education, Moos Health Sciences Tower, a state-of-the-art research and service. setting for research, teaching and practicing dentistry and dental hygiene. Anatomy and Mission: The University of Minnesota School histology laboratories are located in an adjacent building. of Dentistry improves oral and craniofacial health by educating clinicians and scientists Administrative Offices: School of Dentistry who translate knowledge and experience into 15-209 Malcolm Moos Health Sciences Tower clinical practice. 515 Delaware Street S.E. Minneapolis, MN 55455 The School is committed to: www.dentistry.umn.edu • graduating professionals who provide the Accreditation and Membership highest quality care and service to the Predoctoral dental and undergraduate dental people of Minnesota and the world; hygiene programs and all specialty training programs are accredited by the Commission on • discovering new knowledge through Dental Accreditation. The School of Dentistry is a member of the American Dental Education research, which will inspire innovation in Association. the biomedical, behavioral and clinical sciences; and Degrees Offered The dental and dental hygiene programs • providing oral health care to a diverse emphasize scientific, scholarly, interpersonal patient population in a variety of clinical communication and practice management skills required of graduates in a continually changing settings. 5 School’s first dean, William X. Sudduth, introduces hypnotism as an “anesthetic” in his popular oral surgery lectures. In 1894, patients wishing to have teeth extracted with ether pay a deposit of one dollar on artificial teeth. 89
  8. 8. profession. Career planning is integrated into Advanced clinical specialty training programs the core curriculum. Each curriculum offers a are offered in endodontics, geriatrics, oral wide range of courses in: and maxillofacial surgery, orofacial pain, orthodontics, pediatric dentistry, periodontics (1) basic sciences; and prosthodontics. (2) pre-clinical and clinical sciences; (3) behavioral sciences; A Master of Science (M.S.) in dentistry is (4) professional, interpersonal and offered through the University’s Graduate communications skills; and School to train leaders in dental research, (5) practice management and business skills. education, administration, and advanced clinical and oral sciences. This program is open to Teaching methods are tailored to course content dentists in advanced clinical training programs and include traditional lectures, small group and dental hygienists with baccalaureate tutorials, cooperative learning teams, routine degrees (see the Graduate School Catalog or laboratories and advanced simulation, clinical www.catalogs.umn.edu/grad for details). practice in a comprehensive care facility, and community-based clinical experiences. M.S. and Ph.D. programs in oral biology are offered through the University’s Graduate Doctor of Dental Surgery (D.D.S.) School for those who wish to pursue advanced The D.D.S. program is a four-year degree. basic science training. The School of Admission and graduation requirements are on pp. 20–30. M.S. and Ph.D. degrees are also offered in Dentistry has earned clinical research, biological sciences and public an international A Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in dentistry is not health through the University Graduate School reputation for its offered through the School of Dentistry. and the School of Public Health. educational, clinical, However, students can earn a B.S. degree while Minnesota Craniofacial Research research, service and completing a D.D.S. degree if the college Training Program patient care programs. at which they completed pre-professional The Minnesota Craniofacial Research Training coursework recognizes the School of (MinnCResT) Program, funded by a five-year Dentistry’s coursework and awards the degree award from the National Institute of Dental independently. For more information, contact and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), provides your undergraduate institution. generous support for a Dentist-Scientist Training Program (D.D.S./Ph.D.) degree. MinnCResT Bachelor of Science (B.S.) trainees pursue novel interdisciplinary research in Dental Hygiene that expands the frontier and scope of dental, The B.S. program is open to entry-level students craniofacial, and oral health knowledge in and the Degree Completion Program is open their choice of laboratory settings in more than to graduates of accredited associate degree 20 research fields with 80 acclaimed faculty programs in dental hygiene. Admission and mentors. graduation requirements are on pp. 12–19. Other graduate degree programs include Advanced Education Medical Scientist Training Program (M.D. and and Graduate Programs Ph.D.); Ph.D.; postdoctoral (post-Ph.D.); post- Advanced education and graduate programs D.D.S.; postdoctoral/Ph.D.; postdoctoral/M.S. prepare dental professionals for careers in in clinical research; and a short-term research specialty practice, as well as research, education experience for current D.D.S. students. 6 and administration. The use of x-rays as a diagnostic tool becomes available for dental practice and instruction. In 1905, the School’s operating costs are $21,387, of which half is earned from clinic services. 90
  9. 9. defects. A head and facial pain clinic evaluates and treats patients with chronic pain. On-Site Patient Care Clinics, staffed by students and faculty, account for more than 100,000 patient visits annually. Students also fine-tune clinical skills in off-site clinics that provide dental and dental hygiene services to rural Minnesota communities, children of migrant workers and the urban homeless. Continuing Education An Acclaimed Research Institution Internationally recognized for excellence The School’s research faculty has pioneered in continuing dental education, the School discoveries in cancer pain research, fluoride, the provides objective, evidence-based lecture, link between bacteria in dental plaque and heart laboratory, clinical and independent learning disease, and is making promising advancements experiences for dental professionals. Dental in knowledge about molecular motors and how and dental hygiene students are encouraged DNA is packaged into viruses. to participate in selected courses during their The Artificial Mouth, a research tool for senior year. Dental graduates are eligible to measuring the strength of dental materials attend lecture programs at no cost for 18 months was developed here. The Artificial Mouth can after graduation. duplicate the effects of one year of chewing in a single day, allowing a unique opportunity to Alumni Support evaluate new dental materials. The School has an active alumni organization whose generous mentoring and financial School researchers also developed the commitments support educational programs, Virtual Dental Patient, a computerized, three- endowments and research projects. Dentistry dimensional imaging program capable of magazine is published twice a year for alumni, indexing and measuring clinical outcomes and friends, donors, students and parents to inform predicting a patient’s oral health problems. them about School news and activities. Special Clinics Policies The Center for Contemporary Dentistry For a complete listing of School of Dentistry offers students and faculty an opportunity to policies, see the Student Handbook or go to the use the most advanced technology available. School’s Web site, www.dentistry.umn.edu. For The Center features the latest in operatory a complete listing of University of Minnesota equipment, clinical and administrative software, policies, go to www.umn.edu/usenate. digital radiology, intra-oral camera and air abrasion systems, clinical microscopy and International applicants who are accepted to a CADCAM restorative system. The center the four-year dental program must guarantee is generously supported by Patterson Dental sufficient funds to meet all educational and Supply, Inc. personal expenses during their F-1 status at the University. The Cleft Palate, Craniofacial Anomalies, and Orofacial Pain Clinics provide Smoking is prohibited in all facilities of interdisciplinary student training and patient the University except for designated private services for people with congenital or acquired residence hall rooms. Fire damages Medical Hall; dental classes resume 0 days later in temporary facilities. In 1916-17, the School’s D.D.S. program expands to four years for “preparation of dental surgeons of the best type.” 9
  10. 10. Access to Student Educational Records—In Student Services accordance with regents policy on access to Refer to Campus Resources, on p. 33, to contact student records, information about a student the organizations below. generally may not be released to a third party without the student’s permission. (Exceptions Disability services: Disability Services under the law include state and federal ensures access to courses, services, activities, educational and financial aid institutions.) employment and facilities for students, faculty and staff with disabilities. Some student information—name, address, electronic (e-mail) address, telephone number, Students with a documented disability (i.e., dates of enrollment and enrollment status (full physical, learning, psychiatric, vision or time, part time, not enrolled, withdrawn, and hearing) who need to arrange reasonable date of withdrawal), college and class, major, accommodations must contact Disability adviser, academic awards and honors received, Services to be eligible for services. Assistance is and degrees earned—is considered public or available to document disability conditions and directory information. Students may prevent the determine/implement accommodations, and for release of public information. To do so, they information, referral, consultation and training. The Reading Room, must notify the records office on their campus. All services are confidential. Learning Resource Students have the right to review their Counseling: Counseling is available from Center and Bio-Medical educational records and to challenge the individual faculty members, University Library are all located contents of those records. The regents policy is Counseling and Consulting Services, Boynton in the health sciences available for review on the Web at http:// Health Service, the Division of Dental Hygiene onestop.umn.edu/onestop/Grades_Transcripts and the Office for Student Affairs. complex. These facilities /RecordsPolicy.html, at 200 Fraser Hall, contain more than Minneapolis, and at records offices on other Financial aid: The Office of Student Finance campuses of the University. Questions may be offers financial assistance and advising. 420,000 reference books, Applications should be filed after January 1 directed to One Stop Student Services Center, periodicals and research 200 Fraser Hall (612-624-1111). of the year of matriculation. Dental hygiene abstracts. students are advised to apply for financial aid Students are responsible for updating their at the time they apply for admission. personal information, which can be done online through the “Personal Information” link at Student employment: The Office of Human http://onestop.umn.edu/onestop. Resources Job Center posts part-time and summer job openings, but the demands of the E-Mail: the University’s Official Means of dental and dental hygiene programs make it Communication—Students are responsible for difficult for students to devote much time to all information sent via their University e-mail outside employment. A number of summer account. Students who forward their e-mail research fellowships are available to School of account are still responsible for all information, Dentistry students. including attachments, sent to the account. 8 Early graduation allows two-thirds of the dental class to serve in the U.S. Army as first lieutenants in the Dental Reserve Corps. In 1918, the entire class of 90 students enlists in the Dental Reserve Corps. 9
  11. 11. “You can treat patients in Australia, lobby legislators, and make friends you’ll keep for life.” Ryan Ritchie Senior Dental Student Student Life Undergraduate dental and dental hygiene students have representatives with voting “Education must be involved in the privileges on School of Dentistry committees Dental and dental hygiene students participate that deal with student concerns, including the affairs of the world, in a variety of organizations that provide an Educational Policy Committee, Council of concerned with the Students, Student Affairs Committee, School community and introduction to professional life and a voice in of Dentistry Alumni Society, admissions shaping the future of dentistry. committees, and various task force groups. committed to caring.” These committees address issues related to admissions, educational policy and programs, Dedication Plaque student affairs, ethics, alumni relations, Moos Tower publications, financial aid, counseling, tutorial assistance and clinical affairs. Students also participate in student organizations, including the Center for Health Interdisciplinary Participation, an organization for students in the Academic Health Center, and the Graduate and Professional Student Association, which represents the interests of University graduate and professional students. National Organizations The American Student Dental Association is a student-run organization representing the interests of dental students. The Minnesota chapter sponsors student functions and provides information about practice management, managed care and legislative issues. Two representatives from each class serve as board members. Students may serve on eight standing 9 Two-year dental hygiene program, restricted to women, begins. In 1919, the State of Minnesota started licensing “dental nurses.” 90
  12. 12. committees or apply for national positions or Fraternities and Honor Societies externships. Leaders in the local chapter are Fraternities: There are two professional dental elected and many attend national and regional fraternities at the University of Minnesota: Delta meetings. Benefits include publications; life, Sigma Delta and Psi Omega. These fraternities health, and disability insurance programs; credit have undergraduate chapters in this country, as card program; etc. well as active international alumni chapters. The American Dental Education Association Professional fraternities enable dental students is open to faculty, dental students, dental to develop close ties with their peers and hygiene students and individuals with an interest alumni. After graduation, fraternity alumni in dental education. Membership benefits organizations across the nation provide valuable include dental education advocacy, professional professional and social contacts, expert advice development opportunities, publications, and professional guidance. workshops and conferences. Dental fraternities feature speakers, tours and The Student American Dental Hygienists’ forums, as well as social activities. Additional Association is a dental hygiene student’s first benefits include on-campus residence and/or link to the profession. Members join the student parking. chapter of the national association. Benefits include publications, health and insurance Honor societies: Graduating dental students programs, legislative advocacy, etc. Activities may be elected by the faculty to the Beta Beta include community outreach, lunch and learn Chapter of the national dental honor society, sessions, and social activities. Omicron Kappa Upsilon. Graduating dental There are two hygiene students may be elected to the Eta professional dental State Professional Organizations Chapter of the National Dental Hygiene Honor fraternities at the Minnesota Dental Association: Dental students Society, Sigma Phi Alpha. belong to the Minnesota Student District Dental University of Minnesota: Society, which is the eighth district of the Community Outreach Programs Delta Sigma Delta Minnesota Dental Association, the state affiliate Any dental professional will say that “doing” and Psi Omega. of the American Dental Association. dentistry is the best way to learn: Pre-clinical students work on typodonts (models), while Minnesota was the first state to extend more advanced students treat patients under membership privileges to dental students. supervision and mentoring by faculty. This included participation on all Association committees and voting representation on its But one of the School’s most popular programs Board of Trustees and at policy-making sessions offers learning experiences beyond those of its House of Delegates. Dental and dental available in the classroom or clinic. The hygiene students are also invited to attend the School’s community outreach program enables Association’s annual scientific meeting. dental and dental hygiene students to refine clinical skills and develop a broad understanding Minnesota Dental Hygienists’ Association: of the health and social responsibilities they will One student from each dental hygiene class is have as dental professionals. selected to serve as a voting student delegate to the annual session of the Minnesota Dental Hygienists’ Association. 0 Graduate Dr. Jee Lum Wong returns to China and years later is named dean of a new dental school in Nanking. By 1988 faculty and students had amassed teaching, research, consulting and study experience in 88 countries. 96
  13. 13. Students can participate in the following: Hibbing Community College Dental Clinic: In 2002, the School of Dentistry launched its first regional dental clinic. Located 200 miles north of the Twin Cities on the campus of the Hibbing Community College, the clinic is a comprehensive care facility that provides real-life, community-based dental practice experience for student dentists. Dental students staff the clinic, usually working in two-week rotations, under supervision of a faculty member. Mobile Dental Unit: In 2003, the School International Exchange Opportunities: The Summer research fellows teamed with UCare (an area HMO) to turn a School has maintained an education exchange take projects from start 37-foot Winnebago into a dental office on program for more than 20 years. Current wheels. The three-chair clinic travels the state, exchange agreements are with the College of to finish in a dynamic making daily trips from the dental school to Dentistry in Århus, Denmark; the Universities program designed cities around the metro area and week-long trips of Greifswald and Heidelberg, Germany; to further careers in to communities in greater Minnesota. the University of Bergen, Norway; and the University of Nijmegen, The Netherlands. education and research. Community clinics: A number of off-campus programs help students define and refine their This program increases awareness of and clinical skills and assist residents of Twin Cities appreciation for dentistry in a global context. communities with access to dental care. Some Students experience a different culture, political are single day clinics, while others are one- or system and lifestyle, and return with greater multi-week experiences. understanding, sensitivity and acceptance of differences in people, their customs and culture. Special Opportunities Extramural Educational Program: Summer Research Fellowship: Summer Extramural clinical experiences (beyond the research scholarships are available to accepted outreach activities required in the curriculum) students for the summer before they matriculate. are available to students during the summer of Dental and dental hygiene students with an their fourth year in the doctor of dental surgery interest in research and postgraduate research program. These volunteer experiences broaden training also can apply for fellowships. Research students’ clinical experience and enhance fellows are paired with a faculty mentor. diversity in the School’s clinical training sites. During a 10-week period in the summer, they Students are selected for these experiences undertake a structured research program. First- based on completion of sufficient competency time research fellows attend a weekly training examinations for the faculty to be confident in seminar. The following spring, all summer their ability to operate effectively in meeting fellows prepare a written research report and a patient needs in a timely manner. poster (for presentations at local and regional student research meetings). Stipends are Union Gospel Mission: Students and faculty provided in the form of financial aid. For more provide volunteer dental care for the homeless application materials and information, go to in the St. Paul clinic. www.dentistry.umn.edu/research_fellowship. Average U.S. dental school investment in dental research is $,955. In 1927, admission to the D.D.S. program required two years of college. 90
  14. 14. Dental hygienists practice in a variety of settings including private dental offices and clinics; health departments, hospitals and long-term Bachelor of Science care facilities; school districts or departments of education; dental, dental hygiene and dental in Dental Hygiene assisting education programs; private business; correctional facilities; private and public centers for patients with special needs; and health The Division of Dental Hygiene is part of the maintenance organizations. A bachelor of School of Dentistry, located in the Academic science degree in dental hygiene provides the Health Center, on the University of Minnesota’s opportunity to serve as a commissioned officer Minneapolis campus. in the U.S. Public Health Service. Division of Dental Hygiene The Program 9-372 Malcolm Moos Health Sciences Tower The dental hygiene program was established 515 Delaware St. S.E. in 1919 and is accredited by the Commission Minneapolis, MN 55455 on Dental Accreditation. It is the only dental 612-625-9121 hygiene program in Minnesota that grants a 612-625-1605 (fax) baccalaureate degree and is affiliated with a e-mail: krue0191@umn.edu school of dentistry. The Division of Dental Hygiene offers two programs: 1) An entry-level program for those wishing to pursue a career in dental hygiene; and 2) A Degree Completion Program for graduates of accredited associate degree programs in dental hygiene. Graduates of both programs earn a baccalaureate (B.S.) degree. The programs blend a solid dental hygiene clinical education with the biological, behavioral and social sciences, and liberal arts. A commitment to community and service, and to intellectual development and critical thinking is emphasized. Tuition and Fees For information on tuition, fees and estimated total expense, consult the Class Schedule or the estimated expense information provided by the Division of Dental Hygiene. The School provides all instruments and supplies. Students pay a usage fee. Faculty members collaborate with U.S. Public Health Service in research on topical application of fluoride on dental caries. In the same decade, the dental hygiene program moved from a nursing focus to an emplasis on dental hygiene and liberal arts. 90 – 9
  15. 15. “If you want real-world learning— alongside dental students and faculty—you come here.” Megan Roberts Dental Hygiene Student Reciprocity and Resident Tuition Entry-level program requirements: The Dental hygienists Application for reciprocity is separate from following courses or their equivalents must be provide educational, application for admission. completed in the College of Liberal Arts or its equivalent at another regionally accredited clinical, research, Qualified residents of Wisconsin, North institution before entry (semester credits follow administrative, Dakota, South Dakota and Manitoba who in parentheses). All courses must be taken on an consumer advocacy, attend the University of Minnesota may apply A–F grading basis. Biology and chemistry will for reciprocity privileges and pay tuition equal be considered outdated if taken more than five change agent and or comparable to Minnesota residency rates. years before the time of application. therapeutic services. Residents of Kansas, Michigan, Missouri and Nebraska may be eligible for reduced tuition Biol 1009—General Biology (4) at the University through the Midwest Student Chem 1011—General Principles of Chemistry (4) Exchange Program. For more information, call EngC 1011 or 1013—University Writing and Critical the University residency adviser at Reading (4) 612-625-6330 or go to http://onestop.umn.edu. FScN 1112—Principles of Nutrition (3) InMd 3001—Human Anatomy (3) Admission Psy 1001—Introduction to Psychology (4) Applicants should have a genuine interest in Soc 1001—Introduction to Sociology (3) human services and in promoting public health Spch 1101—Introduction to Public Speaking (3) and welfare. A strong interest in the natural, Phsl 3051—Human Physiology (4)** social and behavioral sciences is encouraged. Liberal education requirements* * Students are encouraged to complete as many A class is admitted each fall and admission liberal education requirements as possible before is competitive. Applicants must complete entering the program. the University of Minnesota’s high school preparation requirements prior to entry into the **Beginning 2007, students will be required to take Stat 1001—Introduction to Statistics (3) in place of program. Documentation indicating completion Phsl 3051. of all requirements must be submitted to the Division of Dental Hygiene by August 15 of the Degree Completion Program requirements: year of proposed entry. The Division of Dental For information about the Degree Completion Hygiene sets its standards and requirements for Program, contact the Division of Dental admission. Hygiene. Dental graduate program is created and School celebrates its 50th Anniversary. In 1941, the leading cause of rejection of WWII military inductees was dental defects. 99
  16. 16. English proficiency: Applicants who are not Information for Accepted Applicants native English speakers must submit written Immunizations: Students are required to have evidence of a Test of English as a Foreign a health clearance as a condition of enrollment Language (TOEFL) score. The TOEFL is and must complete and submit an Academic offered in computerized format. A TOEFL score Health Center Immunization Record. The of at least 79 is required. The TOEFL must form must be returned for students to register have been administered within two years of the for classes. For more information, go to the date of application. See p. 33 for registration Boynton Health Service Web site at information. www.bhs.umn.edu/services/AHC.htm#AHC. Application Procedure Criminal background check: Minnesota law Applications are accepted from December 1 requires that a person who provides services to February 1 for entry the following fall. that involve direct contact with patients in Requirements include: health care facilities licensed by the Minnesota There’s a lot to learn. Department of Health have a background • High school graduation; check conducted by the state. The background A study partner shares • ACT, PSAT, or SAT scores; check covers a wide range of criminal offenses the workload and • Transcripts of all high school and college and agency-findings related to maltreatment provides support and courses; of children or vulnerable adults. Individuals • Evidence of plans to complete specified disqualified from having direct patient contact encouragement. prerequisite requirements before entry; as a result of the background check may • A minimum 2.00 GPA (cumulative, be determined ineligible for a degree in the prerequisite and science coursework). program. However, a GPA well above a 2.00 is usually necessary to be admitted; Leave of absence: A Leave of Absence Request • Biology or chemistry, and composition, must be submitted to the Director of Dental psychology and/or sociology grades must Hygiene. Leaves of absence are granted for appear on the transcript at the time of up to one academic year only; students must application. complete the program requirements in effect at the time they re-enter the program. University of Minnesota students: Students already enrolled at the University apply by submitting an Application for Undergraduate Change of College to the One Stop Student Services Center, 200 Fraser Hall. Forms are available at the center (624-1111) and online at www.onestop.umn.edu/onestop/forms.html. Other prospective students: Students not currently enrolled at the University of Minnesota may apply by submitting the Application for Undergraduate Admission at http://admissions.tc.umn.edu or to the University’s Office of Admissions. First American Dental Association accreditation team visits the School, which is ranked 6th in the nation. In 1948, President Truman signs a law creating the National Institute of Dental Research as a branch of the National Institutes of Health. 9
  17. 17. Curriculum Spring Semester DH 3221 Local Anesthesia and Pain Control 2 The following courses must be completed DH 3224W The Dental Hygiene Care Process: to satisfy graduation requirements (semester Clinical Application IV 4 credits follow in parentheses) and must be taken DH 3227 Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology: A–F unless otherwise noted. Dental hygiene Clinic II 0 students are also required to participate in DH 3231W Research Methods in Dental Hygiene 3 DH 3235 Dental Hygiene Care for one or more off-campus day and weeklong Special Needs Patients 2 community outreach programs. See p. 10. PubH 3001 Personal and Community Health 2 Sophomore Year Senior Year Fall Semester Credits Fall Semester The Bachelor of Science DH 2111 Dental Anatomy 2 DH 4125W The Dental Hygiene Care Process: DH 2121 The Dental Hygiene Care Process: Clinical Application V 6 degree expands your Clinical Application I 5 DH 4128 Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology: career options. That’s DH 2132 Head and Neck Anatomy 1 Clinic III 0 BioC 1001 Elementary Biochemistry 3 DH 4131 Epidemiology, Prevention, what sets us apart from MicB 4001 Microorganisms and Disease 2 Dental Public Health, and Liberal Education Requirements 3 Community Outreach 3 an associate degree DH 4132W Ethics, Jurisprudence, and Principles program. Spring Semester of Practice 2 DH 2210 Oral Histology and Embryology 2 DH 4137 Patient Management (PCG) 1 DH 2212 Dental Hygienist-Patient Relationship 2 DH 2221 Periodontology 3 Spring Semester DH 2222 The Dental Hygiene Care Process: DH 4226 The Dental Hygiene Care Process: Clinical Application II 3 Clinical Application VI 5 DH 2231 Cariology 2 DH 4229 Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology: Phsl 3051 Human Physiology 4 Clinic IV 3 DH 4231 Periodontology II Lecture 1 May/Summer Session DH 4232 Community Outreach 1 DH 2211 General and Oral Pathology 2 DH 4233 Legislative, Social, Economic, DH 2233 The Dental Hygiene Care Process: and Practice Factors in Oral Health 2 Clinical Application 1 DH 4238 Patient Management (PCG) 1 DH 2235 Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology 0 DH 3134 Dental Hygiene Care for Pediatric The Division of Dental Hygiene retains the right to Patients 1 revise, add and/or delete any course or requirement. Students will complete requirements in effect at the Junior Year time they enter/re-enter the program. Fall Semester DH 3111 Biomaterials and Principles of Student Support Program Restorative Techniques I 4 The Division of Dental Hygiene monitors DH 3123 The Dental Hygiene Care Process: academic performance and provides tutoring Clinical Application III 4 and consultation as necessary. Counseling and DH 3126 Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology: Clinic I 0 advising are available through the Division, the DH 3131 Periodontology I Lecture 1 University Counseling and Consulting Service DH 3132 Applied Nutrition in Dental Hygiene and faculty. Care 1 DH 3133 Pharmacology 2 DH 3135 Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology: Theory, Principles and Radiographic Analysis 2 5 All states require licensure of dental hygienists. In 1953, the School’s dean initiates the first university-based dental assistant program in the U.S. It is discontinued in 1982 under pressure of budget reductions. 95
  18. 18. Dental Hygiene (DH) DH 3123. The Dental Hygiene Care Process Clinical Application III. (4 cr Prereq-DH student) DH 2111. Dental Anatomy. (2 cr Prereq-DH student) Dental hygiene treatment planning, alternative instruments, and All deciduous/permanent teeth, including tooth form, function, advanced skills related to implementation of dental hygiene care. and relationship to oral health. Calcification, eruption, Clinical experience. exfoliation patterns. Ideal static occlusion, dental terminology, DH 3126. Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology Clinic I. (0 cr; A-F only. tooth annotation systems. Lab includes identification/annotation Prereq-DH student) of teeth. Exposing patient radiographs, interpretation, panoramic/extraoral DH 2121. The Dental Hygiene Care Process Clinical Application I. (5 cr; technique, quality assurance procedures. A-F only. Prereq-DH student) DH 3131. Periodontology I Lecture. (1 cr; A-F only. §DENT 5611. Prereq- Dental hygiene care process, assessment principles related DH student) to medical and oral health status, dental hygiene clinical Periodontal anatomy. Physiology/etiology of periodontal procedures, and development of instrumentation skills. diseases. Clinical, histopathological, and pathogenesis of DH 2132. Head and Neck Anatomy. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq-DH student) gingivitis/periodontitis. Role of genetics, tobacco use, and Anatomical structures of head/neck as they relate to practice of systemic disorders. Preventive/therapeutic procedures associated dental hygiene. with diagnosis, prognosis, treatment planning, and initial phase of periodontal therapy. DH 2191. Independent Study. (0-6 cr [max 6 cr]. Prereq-DH student) Individually arranged study, instruction, or research with faculty DH 3132. Applied Nutrition in Dental Hygiene Care. (1 cr; A-F only. to meet student needs/interests. Prereq-DH student) Principles of diet/nutrition applied to dental hygiene patient care. DH 2210. General and Oral Pathology. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-DH student) Skills in dental dietary counseling. Topics in pathology related to dentistry and oral cavity. Oral benign/malignant tumors. Infectious, inflammatory, and DH 3133. Pharmacology. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-DH student) immunologically mediated lesions/diseases. Principles of pharmacology, physical/chemical properties of drugs, modes of administration, therapeutic/adverse effects, drug DH 2211. Oral Histology and Embroyology. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-DH actions/interactions. student) Development of orofacial region. Structural microscopic DH 3134. Dental Hygiene Care for Pediatric Patients. (1 cr; A-F only. anatomy of oral hard/soft tissues applicable for rendering clinical Prereq-DH student) treatment. Knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for providing dental hygiene care for pediatric patients. DH 2212. Dental Hygienist-Patient Relationship. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq- DH student) DH 3135. Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology: Theory, Principles, and Use of clinical research and evidence-based clinical decision Radiographic Analysis. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-DH student) making when communicating scientifically based clinical therapy Atomic radiations. Characteristics, production, and control of and treatment modalities. Promotion of active participation by radiographs. Radiographic exposures, recent concepts. Radiation patient in clinical decision making. biology, dosimetry, protection, regulations. Discrepancies and technical errors in intraoral radiographs. Radiographic anatomy. DH 2221. Periodontology. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-DH student) Radiographic evidence of deviations from normal anatomic Periodontal diseases. Etiology, assessment, and treatment variations. options. Clinical experience in debridement, root planing, and placing periodontal dressings. DH 3136. Patient Care Group I (PCGs). (1 cr; A-F only) Small-group, cooperative learning integrating dental and dental DH 2222. Dental Hygiene Care Process Clinical Application II. (1-4 cr hygiene students. Application of patient care skills taught [max 4 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-DH student) in other courses. Focuses on communication skills, patient School of Dentistry clinical systems. Various medical/emergency management, team work, collegiality, and practice philosophy conditions affecting patient care and preventive strategies for necessary for practice of dental hygiene. dental diseases. Skill development in fluoride, sealant, and air polishing techniques. Evaluation of products used in treatment of DH 3191. Independent Study. (0 cr. Prereq-DH student) dental caries and periodontal diseases. Clinical experience in dental hygiene care. DH 2231. Cariology. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-DH student) DH 3203. Dental Hygiene Care for Special Needs Patients I. (2 cr; A-F Dental caries. Etiology, pathology, and prevention. only) Knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for providing dental DH 2233. Dental Hygiene Care Process: Clinical Application. (1 cr; S-N hygiene care for pediatric/orthodontic and geriatric patients and only. Prereq-DH student) individuals with disabilities. Clinical experience in dental hygiene patient care. DH 3221. Local Anesthesia and Pain Management. (2 cr; A-F only) DH 2235. Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-DH Concepts in administration of local anesthesia, nitrous oxide- student) oxygen sedation, and other methods of pain management. General principles of radiology, radiation physics, dosimetry, Anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, patient assessment, biology, radiation protection, regulations, concepts of imaging. indications and contraindications, selection of agents, injection DH 3111. Biomaterials and Principles of Restorative Techniques I. (4 cr techniques, complications, emergency management, and legal/ Prereq-DH student) ethical considerations. Lecture, lab, clinic. Principles of biomaterials, restorative techniques. Lecture, DH 3224. The Dental Hygiene Care Process Clinical Application IV. (1-4 preclinical experiences. cr [max 4 cr]; A-F only) DH 3112. General and Oral Pathology. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-DH student) Evaluation of dental hygiene patient care and assurance of Circulatory disturbances, inflammation, and tumors. Emphasizes quality in the dental hygiene profession. Clinical experience in diseases affecting oral cavity, dental caries, periodontal diseases, dental hygiene patient care. oral neoplasias, and similar problems. 6 Faculty and students launch a community-based oral cancer detection program. Over the next 15 years, 32,391 people received free screenings for oral cancer in 17 Minnesota communities. 95
  19. 19. DH 3227. Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology Clinic II. (0 cr; A-F only. Prereq-DH student) Course Symbols Exposing patient radiographs, interpretation, panoramic/extraoral technique, and quality assurance procedures. ,........The comma, used in prerequisite listings, means “and.” DH 3231. Research Methods in Dental Hygiene. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq- #.......Approval of the instructor is required for registration. DH student) Develop skills in scientific method and analyzing research §.......Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for the course listed after this symbol. findings; emphasis on types of research, problem selection, hypothesis writing, research planning and design, data collection A prerequisite course listed by number only (e.g., prereq 5246) is in the same department as the and measuring techniques, analysis and interpretation of data, course being described. and writing the research proposal. DH 3235. Dental Hygiene Care for the Geriatric Patient and the Patient With Special Needs . (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-DH student) DH 4231. Periodontology III Lecture. (1 cr; A-F only. §DENT 6613. Prereq- Knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for providing dental DH student) hygiene care for geriatric patients and patients with special Clinical procedures associated with surgical phase of periodontal needs. therapy. Evaluation of periodontal treatment, maintenance DH 4125. The Dental Hygiene Care Process Clinical Application V. (1-7 phase, and relationship between periodontics and other dentistry cr [max 7 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-DH student) disciplines. Roles of clinical research in periodontics. Adapt dental hygiene care process to meet preventive/treatment DH 4232. Community Outreach. (1 cr; S-N only. Prereq-DH student) needs of traditional and special needs patients. Analyze patient Dental hygiene education in various community settings. preventive/treatment need through case presentation. Community service, cultural diversity, family violence issues. New products, DH 4233. Legislative, Social, Economic, and Practice Factors in Oral techniques, research. Health. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq-DH student) Current status/trends in dentistry in relation to health care DH 4128. Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology Clinic III. (0 cr; A-F only. promotion, regulation, and delivery and political/legislative Prereq-DH student) process. Exposing patient radiographs, interpretation, panoramic/extraoral technique, quality assurance procedures. DH 4241. Extramural Clinical Dental Hygiene. (0-6 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-#) DH 4131. Epidemiology, Prevention, Dental Public Health, and Com- Students participate in educational/clinical experiences with munity Outreach. (3 cr; A-F only. §DENT 5401. Prereq-DH student) diverse patient populations in community outreach clinics. Epidemiological methods of investigation, patterns of oral diseases. Scope/content of specialty of dental public health. DH 4250. Dental Hygiene Community Outreach Elective. (0-8 cr [max 8 Assess plan, implement a community dental health program. cr]; S-N only. Prereq-DH student) Individually arranged dental hygiene clinical experience in DH 4132. Ethics, Jurisprudence, and Principles of Practice. (2 cr; A-F community outreach clinics. only. Prereq-DH student) Career planning, team building, employment seeking, DH 4292. Curriculum Development in Dental Hygiene. (3 cr) jurisprudence, and ethical decision making. Curriculum development /management. Competency based education and outcomes assessment. Role of accreditation in DH 4191. Independent Study. (0-6 cr [max 6 cr]. Prereq-DH student) dental hygiene education. Individually arranged study, instruction, or research with faculty to meet student needs/interests. DH 4293. Course Development in Dental Hygiene. (0-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F only) DH 4211. Principles of Restorative Techniques II. (3 cr) Principles/practice of course development, testing, and Restorative Techniques. Clinical experiences. evaluation. DH 4226. Dental Hygiene Care Process Clinical Application VI. (1-5 cr DH 4294. Directed Research. (0-4 cr [max 4 cr]) [max 5 cr]; A-F only. Prereq-DH student) Critical literature review and/or individual empirical research Advanced dental hygiene care process. Analyze patient project leading to a written report, and/or intensive observation/ preventive/treatment need through case presentation. Community participation in the clinical research center. service, cultural diversity, family violence issues. New products, techniques, research. DH 4295. Instructional Methods in Dental Hygiene Education. (0-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F only) DH 4227. Advanced Dental Hygiene Clinical Experience I. (0-6 cr [max 6 Application of principles of learning, learning styles, teaching cr]. Prereq-DH student) styles, and instructional methods. Microteaching of selected Development of skills in sonic/ultrasonic scaling/assessment, instructional skills. treatment planning, documentation, implementation/evaluation of dental hygiene care. DH 4296. Issues in Dental Hygiene. (0-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F only) Issues, trends, and research related to dental hygiene. Current DH 4228. Advanced Dental Hygiene Clinical Experience II. (0-6 cr [max literature. 6 cr]. Prereq-DH student) Development of skills in sonic/ultrasonic scaling/assessment, DH 4297. Dental Hygiene Education: Supervised Teaching. (1-4 cr [max treatment planning, documentation, implementation/evaluation 4 cr]; A-F only) of dental hygiene care. Observation/participation in supervised teaching experience in dental hygiene education. DH 4229. Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology Clinic IV. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq-DH student) DH 4298. Dental Hygiene Process of Care: Clinical Application. (1-4 cr Exposing patient radiographs, interpretation, panoramic/extraoral [max 4 cr]) technique, quality assurance procedures. Clinical care of patients. Cleft Palate Clinic moves to the School from Sister Kenny Institute. The clinic provides diagnostic and comprehensive treatment-planning services for people with repaired cleft lip and palate and other maxillofacial anomalies. 965
  20. 20. Shirley Burgen Lichtwardt Memorial Scholarship: For selected juniors and seniors who are in good academic standing and have The program blends a established financial need. solid dental hygiene Kathleen J. Newell Outstanding Dental education with the Hygiene Student Award: For selected juniors biological, behavioral and seniors who exhibit scholarship and leadership. and social sciences, and the liberal arts. Sigma Phi Alpha Eta Chapter Membership: National Dental Hygiene Honor Society established to recognize and honor excellence in scholarship, service, and character among graduating dental hygiene students. A maximum of 10 percent of each graduating class is selected for membership. Sigma Phi Alpha Award: Awarded to the sophomore, junior and senior who maintains the highest GPA. Procter Gamble Excellence in Dental Hygiene Award: Awarded to a selected junior who exhibits scholarship, leadership, service and contribution to the dental hygiene profession. Scholarships and Awards The following awards are presented to dental Naomi Rhode Dental Hygienist-Patient hygiene students during the annual Honors Day Relationship Award: Awarded to a selected and Senior Recognition Reception programs. senior who exhibits the most interest and skill in the dental hygienist-patient relationship. Louise C. Ball Scholarship: For selected juniors and seniors who are in good academic Metro Dental Fellow Student Award: standing and have established financial need. Awarded to the senior student (selected by junior students) and junior student (selected by Gordon Marie Hackborn Scholarship: sophomore students) who each exhibits a high For a selected sophomore in good academic level of interpersonal communication skills, standing who has had a personal or professional is involved in other activities, and serves as a challenge while pursuing his/her academic goals mentor to junior and sophomore students. in dental hygiene. Park Dental Service Excellence Award: Ione M. Jackson Scholarship: Established Awarded to a sophomore, junior, and senior to honor a former University of Minnesota student in recognition of commitment to quality program director, the scholarship is awarded patient care and service to the community and to a qualified senior who wishes to become a for being a true professional who provides dental hygiene educator. excellent patient service, education, and relationship building. 8 School researcher photographs viruses and extends knowledge of basic biology at the vascular level. In 1969, Minnesota was the first state to mandate continuing education for dentists and dental hygienists to maintain licensure. 966

×