SLPA 4721

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SLPA 4721

  1. 1. SLPA 4721 1 SLPA 4721 INTRODUCTION TO NEUROLOGICAL COMMUNICATION DISORDERS Semester Hours: 3 Semester/Year: Spring / 2006 Instructor: Dr. Dan Sisterhen Contact: Department of Special Education and Speech-Language Pathology 114 Education Annex State University of West Georgia Carrollton, GA 30118 Office Hours: TBA Telephone: Office – 678-839-6165 Home – 770-751-8807 Cell – 770-241-8060 E-mail: dsisterh@westga.edu Website: www.westga.edu/~dsisterh Fax: 678-839-6162 COURSE DESCRIPTION Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education, SLPA 3701, and SLPA 3704 This course is a study of the primary neurological communication disorders in children and adults. Areas covered include characteristics, assessment, etiology, and treatment of communication disorders of the central and peripheral nervous systems. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK The conceptual framework of the College of Education at UWG forms the basis on which programs, courses, experiences, and outcomes are created. By incorporating the theme “Developing Educators for School Improvement,” the College assumes responsibility for preparing educators who can positively influence school improvement through altering classrooms, schools, and school systems (transformational systemic change). Ten descriptors (decision makers, leaders, lifelong learners, adaptive, collaborative, culturally sensitive, empathetic, knowledgeable, proactive, and reflective) are integral components of the conceptual framework and provide the basis for developing educators who are prepared to improve schools through strategic change. National principles (INTASC), propositions (NBPTS), and standards (Learned Societies) also are incorporated as criteria against which candidates are measured.
  2. 2. SLPA 4721 2 The mission of the College of Education is to develop educators who are prepared to function effectively in diverse educational settings with competencies that are instrumental to planning, implementing, assessing, and re-evaluating existing or proposed practices. This course’s objectives are related directly to the conceptual framework and appropriate descriptors, principles or propositions, and Learned Society standards are identified for each objective. Class activities and assessments that align with course objectives, course content, and the conceptual framework are identified in a separate section of the course syllabus. LEARNING OUTCOMES Link to American Speech, Language, and Hearing Association (ASHA) Knowledge and Skills Acquisition (KASA) The ASHA KASA document details the Standards for the Certificate of Clinical Competence (SCCC). The document is utilized to demonstrate compliance with accreditation standards related to preparing students to meet ASHA certification requirements. It includes nine main knowledge areas (articulation, fluency, voice and resonance, receptive/expressive language, hearing, swallowing, cognitive aspects, social aspects, and communication modalities) across five clinical parameters (etiology, characteristics, prevention, assessment, and intervention). Because of the importance of the KASA standards in tracking and documenting the student’s achievement related to these knowledge areas and clinical parameters, they are directly related to the Learning Outcomes. Accordingly, the relevant Standard(s) are noted under each Learning Outcome. The relevant Conceptual Framework areas and INTASC Principles also are noted and discussed in more detail below. Students will: 1. describe the anatomy, physiology, and science of the central and peripheral nervous systems (Brookshire, 2002); (Lifelong Learner; Adaptive; Knowledgeable; NBPTS 1, 2; ASHA KASA Standard III-B) 2. identify the primary types, causes, and characteristics of neurological communication disorders in children and adults (Brookshire, 2002; Owens, Metz, & Haas, 2003); (Lifelong Learner; Adaptive; Knowledgeable; NBPTS 1, 2; ASHA KASA Standard III-C) 3. describe the primary assessment, treatment and prevention of neurological communication disorders (Brookshire, 2002); (Lifelong Learner; Adaptive; Knowledgeable; Proactive; NBPTS 1, 2; ASHA KASA Standard III-D) 4. explain the communicative and educational characteristics and needs of neurologically disordered children and adults (Brookshire, 2002); and
  3. 3. SLPA 4721 3 (Leader; Lifelong Learner; Adaptive; Culturally sensitive; Empathetic; Knowledgeable; Proactive; NBPTS 1, 2; ASHA KASA Standards III-C, D) 5. explain the appropriate roles for speech-language pathologists in the identification, evaluation, and intervention of neurological disorders in children and adults (Brookshire, 2002; Owens, Metz, & Haas, 2003). (Leader; Decision Makers; Lifelong Learner; Adaptive; Collaborative; Knowledgeable; NBPTS 3; ASHA KASA Standard III-D) TEXTS, READINGS, AND INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES Required Text: Brookshire, R. H. (2002). Introduction to neurogenic communication disorders (6th ed.). New York: Elsevier Science. References: Owens, R. E., Metz, D. E., & Haas, A. (2003). Introduction to communication disorders: A life perspective (2nd ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon. Handouts as needed. ASSIGNMENTS, EVALUATION PROCEDURES AND GRADING POLICY Link to Conceptual framework The focus of this graduate-level course is to acquaint the speech-language pathology student with the major disorders of the auditory system. The graduate student will be prepared to operate as the on-site referral/intervention expert in managing children with auditory disorders in schools. At the completion of this course, the student will have demonstrated achievement in the areas of leadership: taking responsibility for managing neurological communicative disorders (Assignments 2 – 4), lifelong learner: acquiring a sense of ongoing professional investigation (Assignments 1 – 4), adaptive: learning to evaluate situations in light of new information (Assignments 2, 4), culturally sensitive: adapting identification and intervention to meet the needs of a diverse school population (Assignments 2, 3), knowledgeable: acquiring the didactic and clinical content through class notes, text and the literature (Assignments 1 - 4), and being proactive: applying information to prevent neurological communication disorders (Assignments 1 – 4). Assignments: 1) Class Participation: Students are expected to read assigned material prior to class and actively participate in discussions and activities. (5 points) Learning Outcomes 1 - 5.
  4. 4. SLPA 4721 4 2) Assessment Participation: Students will observe and participate in assessment and intervention techniques employed with children and adults with neurological communicative disorders. (5 points) Learning Outcomes 1 - 5. 3) Research Paper / Presentation: Each student will develop a research paper on a selected neurological communication disorder topic. Topics may involve anatomy & physiology, causes, characteristics, assessment, prevention, or treatment. Presentation of the paper may be required pending class size. Details will be covered in a separate handout. (30 points) Learning Outcomes 1 - 5. 4) Examinations: Three exams will be administered during the course at approximately the 5th week, the 11th week and final week. (60 points) Learning Outcomes 1 - 5. Evaluation Procedures: Participation - 5 points Assessment - 5 points Paper - 30 points Examinations - 60 points Grading Policy: A = 90-100 points B = 80-89 points C = 70-79 points F= 60-69 points CLASS POLICIES Attendance is required to experience the full benefit of the class activities. Absences must be approved, in advance where possible. Two or more unexcused absences may result in a one letter-grade reduction. As a reflection of university policy, this class is in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local laws, including but not limited to, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Equal Pay Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (to the Higher Education Act of 1965), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Vietnam-Era Veterans Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974, and all amendments to the foregoing. As advocates of both the letter and intent of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, we will make every accommodation possible to support students with disabilities
  5. 5. SLPA 4721 5 that may impact negatively academic performance. Students with disabilities should discuss the need for adaptations or accommodations at the beginning of the semester CLASS OUTLINE Week 1: Introduction/Class Orientation Anatomy and Physiology of the Central and Peripheral Nervous System Week 2: Anatomy and Physiology of the Central and Peripheral Nervous System Week 3: Anatomy and Physiology of the Central and Peripheral Nervous System Week 4: Types, Characteristics, and Causes of Neurological Communication Disorders in Children and Adults Week 5: Exam 1 Types, Characteristics, and Causes of Neurological Communication Disorders in Children and Adults Week 6: Types, Characteristics, and Causes of Neurological Communication Disorders in Children and Adults Week 7: Types, Characteristics, and Causes of Neurological Communication Disorders in Children and Adults Week 8: The Identification and Assessment of Neurological Communication Disorders in Children and Adults Week 9: The Identification and Assessment of Neurological Communication Disorders in Children and Adults Week 10: The Identification and Assessment of Neurological Communication Disorders in Children and Adults Week 11: Exam 2 Week 12: The Prevention and Treatment of Neurological Communication Disorders in Children and Adults Week 13: The Prevention and Treatment of Neurological Communication Disorders in Children and Adults Week 14: The Prevention and Treatment of Neurological Communication Disorders in Children and Adults
  6. 6. SLPA 4721 6 Week 15: The Prevention and Treatment of Neurological Communication Disorders in Children and Adults Class Presentations Week 16: Exam 3 ACADEMIC HONESTY Students are expected to adhere to the highest standards of academic honesty. Plagiarism occurs when a student uses or purchases ghostwritten papers. It also occurs when a student utilizes the ideas of or information obtained from another person without giving credit to that person. If plagiarism or another at of academic dishonest occurs, it will be dealt with in accordance with the academic misconduct policy as stated in Student Handbook, Undergraduate Catalog, and Graduate Catalog.

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