DISABILITY SURVIVAL MANUAL
FOR PERSONS ADAPTING TO DISABILITY
BY PERSONS LIVING WITH DISABILITY

Fourth Edition, April 200...
just another part of your life. This manual can be a valuable resource to you when you
have questions about many aspects o...
Having a disability is a lot like this experience. There are railings seemingly everywhere.
The railings are the barriers....
What is independent living?

Who can help me put it all together?

Where do I find a Center for Independent Living?

Writt...
drive, or do not have a vehicle, public transportation is often available. The Americans
with Disabilities Act (ADA) requi...
work for people with disabilities, are uncomfortable or not knowledgeable about sexual
issues as they relate to disability...
* Learning about your rights
* Standing up for your rights
* Establishing support from others when you doubt yourself


“A...
- Accommodation (“I’m going to be all right, now what?”)

    These feelings come and go, but it may take a while. Having ...
employers have “return to work” programs which will help you return to your previous
job or get another position with the ...
The Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA) was enacted in 1986 to eliminate hindrances in air
travel for persons with disabilities....
community). Centers usually offer a variety of other services to meet the needs of the
local community. There are five CIL...
Like a “Readers Digest.” Personal stories, resources and humor. Gillum Rd. and High
Dr., P.O. Box 700, Bloomington, IL 617...
ABIL is a fragrance and smoke free environment.
Materials in alternate formats and accommodations available upon request.
...
* communication skills
* cooking skills
* personal assistance supervision
* financial management

Personal Assistant Servi...
Programs are made possible through funding from individual and corporate contributions,
Area Agency on Aging, DES/DDD, DES...
Governor’s Council on Spinal & Head Injuries 863-0484
  Pride (Parents Reestablishing Independent Development Encouragemen...
*24 hour Crisis Hotline
  ABS Crisis Line (Value Options) - 222-9444 / (800) 631-1314
  Empact Suicide Hotline - (480) 784...
Career Development Center - 861-0268
  Center for New Direction - 252-0918
  City of Phoenix - 534-5627
  ClearPath - City...
impaired, large type books, Braille printers, Braille and audio magazines, Kurzweil
reading machine)
  Walgreens Health In...
Peoria - (623) 773-7140
   Phoenix - 262-6952
   Pinal County - (520) 868-7201
   Tempe - (480) 350-8950
   South Tucson -...
Apria Healthcare - 282-1400
  Cactus Healthcare & Supplies - 623-995-5005 (Glendale)
  Health N Home - 800-645-1233
  Lion...
-     Also contact any local Parks and Recreation Dept, local YMCA/YWCA, Adult
        Day
      Care, or Senior Center wh...
www.azseals.org


INDEPENDENCE
I Initiative to make changes
N Never accepting barriers
D Developing a plan to help myself
...
DES        Department of Economic Security
DHS        Department of Health Services
DME        Durable Medical Equipment
D...
VA           Veterans Administration
VICAP        Volunteer Interfaith Caregivers Program
VR           Vocational Rehabili...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Disability Survival Manual 2002 (.doc)

1,292 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,292
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Disability Survival Manual 2002 (.doc)

  1. 1. DISABILITY SURVIVAL MANUAL FOR PERSONS ADAPTING TO DISABILITY BY PERSONS LIVING WITH DISABILITY Fourth Edition, April 2002 Written By Donna Redford Kruck & Susan Webb Graphic Design and Layout: John Smith, Donna Redford Kruck & Carolan Quenneville Edited by: Darrel Christenson, Elizabeth Bonn, Tyrone Harrington, Faith Barrett Pam Whitaker-Lee, Lynn Bejnar, Megha Morganfield, Carolan Quenneville Copies Available From: ABIL, 1229 E. Washington, Phoenix, AZ 85034-1101 Phone: (602) 256-2245 V/TTY (800) 280-2245 V/TTY Fax: (602) 254-6407 e-mail: azbridge@abil.org Web site: www.abil.org This manual is available in alternate formats upon request: disk, tape, large print, or Braille Funded by The Flinn Foundation and U.S. DOE / RSA INTRODUCTION BY SUSAN WEBB Whether your new disability is permanent or temporary, it is probably making a major change in your life. Not only does it affect you, but also your family, friends, and possibly your co-workers and employer. There have probably been a legion of professionals (e.g. doctors, social workers, attorneys) giving you expert advice on what lies ahead for you. As good as their information is, they probably are not people who have a disability of their own. Let’s face it, in your most private moments, only you know what you are experiencing. That is why we put together the Disability Survival Manual. The material in this manual is designed and written by those of us who have disabilities. We have “been there.” Although each person’s disability is unique, there are some common elements between your experience and that of the 54 million others in the country with a disability. This manual tells it like it is. After you read it, we hope you will come away from it with two things: 1) life with a disability is not the end of the world- it’s just a new beginning, and 2) knowing where to go, and taking charge of getting there, will make life full, exciting, and rewarding. The people who wrote this manual are not “super crips.” None of us have been on the evening news climbing mountains or hopping across the country on an artificial limb. We are people just like you. Some of us have a family, some of us drive a car, some of us love chocolate, and some of us would not dream of missing Monday Night Football. The only difference is that we have a few more years of adjusting to our disability behind us than you do. So maybe our experience will give you a head-start toward knowing the ropes of living with a disability. Some days may be very difficult in the beginning. Your whole life may revolve around having a disability. But soon your disability will become
  2. 2. just another part of your life. This manual can be a valuable resource to you when you have questions about many aspects of life with a disability. If at any time you don’t find what you need in this manual, ABIL is just a phone call away at 256-2245 or 1-800-280-2245. We will not tell you what to do, but we will provide you with information that you can use to make your own choices about your life. It all may seem overwhelming right now, but things will get better. Today is a good day to get started back on the road to Survival. With the resources in this manual, we hope you will do better than survive... we hope you will do as millions of others with disabilities have done, you will thrive! Susan Webb, Community Advocate Former ABIL Executive Director Surviving Disability is a Journey By Phil Pangrazio, Executive Director, ABIL If you, or someone you love, recently experienced a disability, then this survival manual is just for you. Its contents will provide you the knowledge and resources to become far more independent than you may now think possible. Taking the initiative, of course, is up to you! Living with a significant physical disability is a long journey. More important though, it is a journey that has been traveled by millions of people just like you. At first, the majority of your thoughts are dedicated to survival. Where will I live? How will I get around? Who will help me get showered and dressed? Will I have enough money? Can I ever be employed again? These and many more questions will leave you feeling lonely and isolated. What you have to remember, however, is that you are not alone! This road has lots of tire tracks and the people who traveled before you have laid lots of pavement. Because of their effort, your journey will be much easier. You should think of this survival manual as a roadmap that can assist you in becoming truly independent. Maybe not in a physical sense, but on an emotional level, you will direct your life. You will be in charge. But, it’s up to you! As you are now learning, nobody can truly understand disability until it happens. But when it does, its onset is much like being a newborn. There are lots of unfamiliar obstacles and much learning required to survive. Survival, in fact, would be impossible without the help of mom and dad. To a newborn, life is about dependency and feelings of helplessness. The early stages of disability is much this. Remember when you were a baby and you were left in the crib too long? Mom wasn’t far away, but it seemed like an eternity before she came to your rescue. You wanted to get out, but you couldn’t. You wanted your independence, but the railings were too high. The more you fought, the more frustrated you got.
  3. 3. Having a disability is a lot like this experience. There are railings seemingly everywhere. The railings are the barriers. You will need to learn to eliminate them, or at least manage and adapt to them. Only then can you become as independent as your abilities and talents will allow. Importantly though, you have a choice in this process. You can be passive or active. I strongly suggest you choose the latter approach. Taking an active role or “taking charge” in choosing what is best for you will vastly improve your self-esteem, and earn the respect of others. But it does not happen over night! It takes time and persistence. Just like the newborn, a person with a disability must grow and mature. Sometimes you must re-learn to do something that only months before you took totally for granted, like signing your name. You may have to adapt to a new and different body. But most important, you just need to gain experience in your new environment before you can effectively live within it. Eventually, you will learn that living with a disability is not such a tragedy. You will become comfortable with and accepting of...who you are, how you look, and what physical limitations you have. You will learn to enjoy the journey and appreciate the many wonderful experiences and relationships that await you. Good luck in your journey. THINGS TO THINK ABOUT – Table of Contents Where will I live? What if I can’t do something by myself, how will I get along? How will I get around? What will I do for fun and relaxation, now that I have a disability? I want to be as independent as possible. Is there equipment that can help me? What about intimacy, closeness, and sexuality? No one knows what it’s like for me. I feel so all alone! Sometimes I feel like I’m starting all over. What’s self advocacy and why do I need it? When can I get on with my life? Will I still be able to be a good parent? Will I be able to work? What are my rights as a person with a disability?
  4. 4. What is independent living? Who can help me put it all together? Where do I find a Center for Independent Living? Written proof you are not alone. ABIL Programs ABIL Information & Referral phone list Abbreviations Thank You Page THINGS TO THINK ABOUT Where will I live? Your home may require temporary, and/or permanent modification to make it accessible and maximize your independence. Doors can be widened, ramps built, counter tops lowered, or bath tubs removed and replaced by walk-in or roll-in showers. Just rearranging furniture and placement of appliances and dishes can improve access. If your income has been dramatically reduced, you may need to find a roommate to share housing costs or seek subsidized housing. Some realtors specialize in accessible housing. The Fair Housing Act protects you from landlord or real estate discrimination. What if I can’t do something by myself, how will I get along? You can be independent and still need help for certain activities. A personal assistant is someone who helps you with daily tasks, such as transferring, dressing, toileting, cooking, eating, laundry, housekeeping, shopping, range of motion exercises, answering mail, reading, reminding you to take medication, etc. A personal assistant can, with your direction, do things you are unable to do for yourself. They can also help with tasks so that you can save your time and energy for other priorities, like work or spending time with your children. A personal assistant may be a relative or friend, or someone who is paid to help you. You need to communicate your needs clearly and openly. You may never have been a “supervisor” before, and may need to improve your communication and planning skills. How will I get around? Many people with disabilities are able to drive, although some require modifications to their vehicle. The modifications vary according to personal preference and physical needs. The modifications might include adding hand controls, power steering, or cruise control to the vehicle, or the purchase of a modified van with a lift. If you are unable to
  5. 5. drive, or do not have a vehicle, public transportation is often available. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires that where public transportation exists, it must be accessible. Public transportation includes lift equipped buses, and Dial-A-Ride paratransit for those unable to use the buses. If learning to use public transportation is intimidating, you can get a “buddy” to go along the first few times. Each city is responsible for its own public transportation, thus services vary from city to city. What will I do for fun and relaxation now that I have a disability? People with disabilities enjoy many of the same forms of recreation as non-disabled persons: i.e., playing tennis, billiards, or rugby, going to the theater or symphony, playing with computer games, searching the Internet, bicycling, skiing, swimming, hang gliding, bowling, and weight lifting. You might need adaptive equipment, or you may need to find new interests. In any case, we all need to find forms of recreation to relax, have fun and feel better about ourselves and about life. I want to be as independent* as possible. Is there equipment that can help me? Assistive technology, sometimes referred to as adaptive equipment or durable medical equipment, is any device that helps you live or work independently. Assistive technology can enhance your life and help you achieve your goals, whether they are recreational, employment, activities of daily living, or community service. Assistive technology includes: *wheelchairs * home modifications * canes * a shower/transfer bench * walkers * computer adaptations * reachers * modified telephones * scooters * electric door openers * Independent: Directing your own life, making your own decisions, accepting the consequences of your decisions. What about intimacy, closeness and sexuality? Closeness and intimacy is something all human beings need. People often confuse intimacy with sex. Intimacy is being able to be yourself with another person. Sharing your thoughts and feelings can be difficult, especially during times of crisis. Giving and receiving are both important components of intimacy. Physical closeness is important, especially when we are experiencing pain. Intimacy can be expressed in a hug, holding a hand, or a massage. Sexual expression has come to be accepted as an important right of all people. Sexuality is a component of personality and is not lost as a result of illness or injury. However, the general public, and in some instances even the professionals who
  6. 6. work for people with disabilities, are uncomfortable or not knowledgeable about sexual issues as they relate to disability. Consequently, information is often difficult to get. Education about human sexuality can break the cycle of ignorance, and prevent loss of self-esteem and disruption to intimate relationships. If your physician is not helpful, you may need to turn to a family life educator or a peer who seems to have a satisfying intimate relationship. If you are wondering if you will be able to have a sexual relationship, the answer is yes! If we, as people with disabilities regard ourselves as sexual beings, others will as well. Hygiene and grooming are as important for those of us with disabilities as for anyone else. By staying socially active in the things we enjoy, relationships just naturally develop. No one knows what it’s like for me. I feel all alone! Sometimes no one really understands what you are going through as well as another who has been there too. Our experiences are not exactly the same just because we also happen to have a disability, but why reinvent the wheel if you can gain from someone else’s experience? The hallmark of Independent Living Philosophy is that people with disabilities know best what they need and working with a “buddy” to learn the “tricks of the trade” can make life easier and more fun. Centers for Independent Living are the most common resource for trained Peer Mentor volunteers, who can be role models in helping you adjust. Sometimes I feel like I’m starting all over. Now that you have a disability you may need to learn new skills, or relearn skills in an adapted way to maximize your independence. Independent living skills include: financial management, use of public transportation or drivers training, personal assistance management, self advocacy, meal preparation and nutrition, mobility training, wheelchair maintenance, household management, new career exploration. "Whether you think you can, or you think you can't, you are probably right" - Henry Ford - What is self advocacy and why do I need it? No one knows better than yourself what your needs are. You may have been a shy person before your disability. It would be great if people could read your mind or if your city was completely accessible to you. Chances are they can’t and it isn’t. Whether it is dealing with your doctor, the lack of accessibility at your favorite shopping center, or supervising your personal assistant, you need to have self advocacy skills. Some of us are natural self advocates, but many are not. Self advocacy is an attitude and a communication skill that can be learned. * Making decisions about your life * Taking charge of your life * Taking action for yourself * Speaking up for yourself * Being responsible for your actions
  7. 7. * Learning about your rights * Standing up for your rights * Establishing support from others when you doubt yourself “ABIL has enhanced my advocacy skills. For example, I wanted to eat at Arizona Center Food Court and discovered I couldn’t get in the door. I worked with Ken, a peer mentor, to advocate for an automatic door opener. It took us several visits to the operations manager, but we were emphatic about achieving accessibility and we knew the law was on our side. That was just the beginning of my advocacy efforts. I recently went to Washington, D. C., where I advocated for a national attendant care program.” - Kathy Tweet - When can I get on with my life? I just want to forget that this ever happened. Will it ever be the same? Why did this happen to me? Learning to live with a disability is a four-fold process: physical, emotional, mental and spiritual. Physical You may be working to heal your body to the best of its ability through physical therapy, good nutrition, exercise, etc. You may need to take ongoing medication, learn to use a catheter, learn how to transfer from your wheelchair, etc. You may need personal assistance for some activities that you previously did without help. Your independence may be improved with the use of appropriate assistive technology: a reacher, or a mobility aid like a wheel chair, walker, cane, hand controls for your car, etc. You may need to find a new place to live. Your home or work environment may need to be adapted: rearranging the furniture, building a ramp, widening a door, getting a shower bench. You may have to adapt to a new form of transportation. Emotional You’ll probably find yourself and those close to you experiencing a variety of emotions as you (and they) adapt to living with a disability. This is often referred to as the “grieving” process. We experience not only a grief response to our disability, but also to the lack of accommodation we find in our environment and the attitudes we encounter in others. The most common ones are: - Shock (disorientation) - Denial (“Oh, not me!”) - Anger (“Why me?”) - Bargaining (“You sure there is no way I can change this?” “What if I ...” “ If only I hadn’t...”) - Depression (“I can’t live like this, I just don’t care about anything anymore.”) - Fear (“ I’m afraid I can’t make it. What will happen next?”)
  8. 8. - Accommodation (“I’m going to be all right, now what?”) These feelings come and go, but it may take a while. Having feelings is a natural part of the adaptation process. It can help to share them with someone, especially someone who has been through it themselves. Mental “We’re as happy as we make up our minds to be.” - Abe Lincoln - Your mental adaptation includes your attitudes, beliefs and knowledge. All of these involve learning and decision making. Your learning will include new skills, new resources and knowledge of your civil rights as a person with a disability. One of the skills you may need to learn is self-advocacy. There are many resources that can help. The resource section of this manual lists many of them. Most of us have grown up in a culture that holds certain stereotypes about disability that are not very respectful, accurate or productive. Unfortunately, many places are still inaccessible and discrimination still exists. This can be frustrating. Knowing your civil rights and how to access them can help you lead the life you want and reduce feelings of frustration and exclusion. Spiritual Many people find that adapting to a disability is also a spiritual process as many questions arise: Why did this happen? Why me? Who’s in charge? What is my purpose for living? Is this a punishment? Is there a silver lining to this cloud? Whether you are religious or not, you may find yourself searching for answers. It may lead you places you never have gone before and it is a journey most of us take at some time in our lives. You may have to advocate for your place of worship to accommodate your disability, whether by building a ramp, or providing transportation. Your advocacy will pave the way for others to benefit as well! Will I still be able to be a good parent? Parenting with a disability can challenge you to new heights of creativity! Although you may need to do some things in a non-traditional way, there are still plenty of ways to express love and demonstrate caring to your children. Support from other parents with disabilities can make a big difference. Young people are adaptable and can generally accept having a parent with a disability as long as they understand it. Most experts agree that your loving attention, interest, and respect is the foundation for a good relationship. Children may need information about your disability, and they may need to express feelings about it from time to time. Your job is not to fix everything that is difficult or protect them from every hurt. Your job is to love them, and help them find the information they need. No parent can do everything they want for their children. Your creative adaptation to your disability is excellent problem solving modeling for your children and any child that has the benefit of knowing you. Will I be able to work? You may have questions about your ability to work. “Will I be able to return to the job I had before my disability”? “Will I be able to get my first job now that I have a disability”? Most of the time the answer is “Yes,” to both of these questions. Many larger
  9. 9. employers have “return to work” programs which will help you return to your previous job or get another position with the same company, as long as you are qualified to perform the duties of that job. Employers need reliable, qualified workers with or without disabilities now more than at any other time in history. In fact, employers who employ 15 or more people, have a legal obligation to give you an equal chance at any job that you are qualified to do. They have an obligation to make reasonable accommodations at your work site, such as raise the desk, lower shelves, or make the area larger. They must provide adaptive equipment that makes it possible for you to do the job, as long as the cost of the equipment or changes is not more than they can afford, based on the size and success of their business. There are federal and state organizations within the community which can help retrain you for another job if you aren’t able to return to the job you had prior to your disability. These programs include Vocational Rehabilitation, Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) and Project with Industries programs. These programs can also help you get ready for your first job if you lack job skills. Phil Pangrazio, ABIL Executive Director Before coming to ABIL, Phil worked as a medical financial analyst for Maricopa Health Systems. “My injury happened when I was 19. I decided to choose a career that would emphasize my mind rather than my body. I got a Masters degree in Health Services Administration. I enjoy all types of sports and had been a jock in school. Ten years after my injury, I discovered Quad Rugby. That was years ago and I’m still playing.” What are my rights as a person with a disability? There have been many inequities for persons with disabilities. In the 1950’s children with disabilities were often institutionalized or educated in segregated schools. Even today, some businesses and public programs are not “user-friendly.” Now that you are disabled you may be more aware of the barriers, both physical and attitudinal that exist: Bathrooms and doors that don’t accommodate wheelchair users, voting booths that are not accessible, lack of curb cuts, or ramps too steep to use safely. Fortunately, there are now several laws which protect your rights as a community member and as a worker. Here are just three: The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 requires that all public programs and public accommodations be accessible including city, state and federal government programs, public transportation, telephone access, businesses, restaurants, retail stores, theaters, and virtually anywhere open to the public. The ADA requires both program and architectural accessibility that does not impose “undue hardship” for the business owner or government entity. The ADA prohibits employer discrimination based on disability and makes it illegal to ask a job applicant if they have a disability. The employer must focus recruitment on the “essential functions of the job” and can only ask what accommodations you might need after you have been offered the job. There are other protections under the ADA which can help an employee with a disability who is being treated unfairly.
  10. 10. The Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA) was enacted in 1986 to eliminate hindrances in air travel for persons with disabilities. All domestic air carriers and all airport facilities must be fully accessible. The ACAA protects you from discrimination, ensures equality in travel opportunities and treatment, and makes the carrier liable if they damage your wheelchair or other mobility aids. The Fair Housing Act protects against discrimination in housing. It is illegal to refuse to rent or sell property to someone based on that person’s disability or protected class status. It also requires landlords to allow their tenants to make modifications to dwellings at the tenant’s expense. The modifications must return to the original status, if the landlord requests it, when the tenant leaves. What is Independent Living and Self-Determination? Independent Living and Self-Determination are values that stress dignity, self- responsibility, choices and decision-making. You get to be in charge of your own life. You might seek advice, but you make decisions for yourself. You know what is best for you. It does not mean doing everything all by yourself. You might need assistance around your home, for mobility or to balance your checkbook. You choose who helps you. You pursue your dream. It is having the freedom to fail and learn from your failures, just as non-disabled persons do. Most Americans take for granted opportunities regarding living arrangements, employment, transportation, recreation, shopping, voting, dining, and other aspects of everyday life. For many with disabilities, however, barriers take away or severely limit our choices. Some barriers are obvious, such as lack of ramped entrances for people who use wheelchairs, lack of interpreters for people with hearing impairments, and lack of Braille for people who are blind. Other barriers, often less obvious, involve prejudices and misunderstanding which result in low expectations about what people with disabilities can do. These attitudes can be internalized by the person with the disability, which leads to dependency, low self-esteem and lack of personal satisfaction. This need not occur! Millions of Americans who experience and live with a disability have established lives of independence, fulfilling vital roles in our communities - from voters, volunteers, employers, parents, athletes - an unlimited list. In some cases, the barriers have not been removed, but these individuals have been successful in dealing with them. Who can help me put it all together? Centers for Independent Living (CIL) are unique in that we have people with disabilities who make policy decisions and implement programs. CIL staff and volunteers have the training, personal experience to know what is needed to live independently and have a deep commitment to helping other people with disabilities achieve independence. Where do I find a Center for Independent Living? Fortunately, people with disabilities don’t have to do it all on our own. Centers for Independent Living (CIL) offer a variety of programs that can help you live a fulfilling life with a disability. The core services offered at all CILs are: Information & Referral, Independent Living Skills Instruction, Peer Support and Advocacy (individual and
  11. 11. community). Centers usually offer a variety of other services to meet the needs of the local community. There are five CILs in Arizona (400 across the U.S.): Centers for Independent Living in Arizona ABIL (Arizona Bridge to Independent Living) (Phoenix & Central AZ) 1229 E. Washington Phoenix, AZ 85034-1101 256-2245 /(800)280-2245 E-mail: azbridge@abil.org Listserv: empower@abil.org (Advocacy) Website: www.abil.org DIRECT Independent Living Center (Tucson & Southern Arizona) 1023 North Tyndall Avenue Tucson, AZ 85719-4446 (520) 624-6452 / (800) 342-1853 E-mail: directilc@earthlink.net Website: www.directilc.org New Horizons Independent Living Center (Prescott Valley & Northern AZ) 8085 E. Manley Drive #1 Prescott Valley, AZ 86314-6158 (928) 772-1266 E-mail: nhilc@cableone.net Website: http://www.northlink.com/~nhilc SMILE (Services Maximizing Independent Living & Empowerment) (Yuma Area) 1929 S. Arizona Avenue Yuma, AZ 85364 (928) 329-6681 / 1-866-239-7645 smile6@mindspring.com www.neiaw.com/smile/smileindex.html ASSIST! to Independence (Tuba City & Navajo Reservation) P.O. Box 4133 Tuba City, AZ 86045 (928) 283-6261 or (928) 283-6672 E-mail: assist@tubacity.net WRITTEN PROOF YOU ARE NOT ALONE We sometimes need proof that we are not alone in experiencing a disability. There are many books, journals and magazines that tell our stories, and have updates on current issues and resources. The following is a small sampling of periodicals that can introduce you to ideas and resources. ACCENT ON LIVING
  12. 12. Like a “Readers Digest.” Personal stories, resources and humor. Gillum Rd. and High Dr., P.O. Box 700, Bloomington, IL 61702 DISABILITY INTERNATIONAL Get a wider view, learn what people with disabilities are doing all over the world. Quarterly. 101-7 Evergreen Place, Winnipeg, MB Canada R3L 2T3 SPORTS ‘N SPOKES By-monthly magazine published by the Paralyzed Veterans of America, focusing on adapted sports for persons with disabilities. 2111 East Highland Ave., Suite 180, Phoenix, AZ 85016-4702 DISABILITY TODAY Advanced equity & opportunity for people with a disability. Quarterly. P.O. Box 2659 Niagara Falls, NY 14302-9945 IT’S OK! Living with a disability, putting it in perspective. Focuses on relationships and sexuality. Quarterly. Sureen Publishing, Box 23102, 124 Welland Ave., St. Catherines, ONT, Canada L2R 7P6 ABILITY Health , Disability, Human Potential, Personal stories and resources. P.O. Box 4140 Irvine, AZ 92716-9919 MOUTH Grass roots, hard hitting and humorous look at the disability movement, oppression and the proactive action being taken to set things right. Articles, poetry and cartoons. 61 Brighton St., Rochester, NY 14607. Bi-monthly. EXCEPTIONAL PARENT Support for parenting with a disability. 209 Harvard St., Suite 303, Brookline, MA 02146-5005 NEW MOBILITY Disability Lifestyle, Culture and Resources. Monthly. P.O. Box 15518 North Hollywood, CA 91615-5518 RAGGED EDGE The Disability Experience in America (formerly the Disability Rag & Resource) The voice of a mighty revolution, spirited and provocative stories that strive to change the way people view what it means to have a disability. The Avocado Press, Box 145, Louisville, KY 40201. ABIL PROGRAMS
  13. 13. ABIL is a fragrance and smoke free environment. Materials in alternate formats and accommodations available upon request. ARIZONA BRIDGE TO INDEPENDENT LIVING Our Mission: ABIL offers and promotes programs designed to empower people with disabilities to take responsibility so they may achieve or continue independent lifestyles within the community. Home Modification: Through local Community Development Block Grants and other resources, ABIL increases home accessibility through modifications for residents in participating cities. This is a match program, so consumers are expected to contribute 10% either in cash, in-kind or volunteer contributions toward the cost. Licensed contractors provide modifications such as widening doorways, building ramps, installing roll-in showers, grab bars, power-assisted doors and other needed modifications. Information & Referral: ABIL serves as an up-to-date information source on disability resources, including personal assistance, housing, assistive devices, employment, consumer rights, home modification, peer support, transportation and recreation. ABIL publishes a monthly newsletter, “The Bridge,” which covers agency and community news, advocacy efforts, legislative changes, services available, and other articles of interest. Socialization Through Recreation: ABIL’s Soc/Rec program plans a monthly calendar with a variety of events ranging from concerts and plays to sports and picnics. Events are offered at reduced prices or no cost. Soc/Rec activities provide opportunities to meet new people, gain refreshing perspective on your disability, have fun, develop interpersonal skills and self-confidence. Advocacy: ABIL offers a variety of opportunities for consumers to have input into the laws, policies and procedures that affect their lives. Through the use of individual, legislative and community advocacy, ABIL’s staff, consumers and volunteers participate in shaping the future of our community in a positive, team-building manner. ABIL can inform you on state and national advocacy efforts to improve accessibility and opportunities for persons with disabilities. Call for information on ABIL’s Beginning Advocacy Class, Empower Listserv, and current advocacy activities. Independent Living Skills Instruction: Independent Living is the freedom to direct one’s own life. Each individual has the right to optimize his or her personal ability, and fully participate in their community. ABIL assists motivated consumers in developing self-determined goals to gain greater independence. Our independent living skills instruction includes: * transportation skills * stress management * household management * self-advocacy
  14. 14. * communication skills * cooking skills * personal assistance supervision * financial management Personal Assistant Service (PAS): PAS is a service that trains and employs individuals who provide in-home Personal Assistant services to individuals who are eligible for Arizona Long Term Health Care Services. Peer Support: ABIL Peer Mentor volunteers provide peer support, advocacy, and participate in other activities to benefit our community. These volunteers are generally people with disabilities who have successfully achieved independent living in their own life and want to assist others to achieve their independent living and employment goals. ABIL works with major rehab centers in the Valley to provide peer support to newly disabled individuals during their rehabilitation. Peer mentoring and other support activities can facilitate the process of learning to live with a disability and gaining a positive self-image, setting the stage for a successful life. ADA Services: ABIL offers programs to facilitate implementation of the Americans with Disabilities Act throughout the state. We provide technical assistance and materials to businesses and persons with disabilities on the requirements and options of the ADA. We offer advocacy services with the intent of facilitating cooperative compliance. ABIL provides ADA consulting on larger projects such as facilities surveys and job accommodations. Work Incentives Planning Assistance: If you want to return to work but need to know how it will effect your medical and Social Security benefits, ABIL’s Work Incentives Specialists can help you understand your rights, analyze your individual situation, determine what works best for you and help you create a plan toward self-sufficiency. ABIL Employment Services: ABIL Employment Services (AES) is available to people receiving Social Security disability (SSI/SSDI) benefits who wish to go back to work. AES is specifically targeted to implement the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999, that allows beneficiaries to ease off benefits and into competitive, integrated jobs working along side non-disabled peers. We offer a variety of services to help people leave poverty behind and become economically self-sufficient. Outreach to Rehab Centers: For those who are new to having a disability, questions and concerns about the future and keeping family together can seem endless. ABIL’s Early Intervention program works with individuals in Rehab centers, and orients them to all of ABIL’s programs designed to help them through the maze. Reintegration from Nursing Homes: ABIL’s Reintegration program assists young people to successfully coordinate services in order to move from nursing homes back into the community.
  15. 15. Programs are made possible through funding from individual and corporate contributions, Area Agency on Aging, DES/DDD, DES/RSA, CDBG funds from the cities of Glendale, Peoria, Phoenix and Mesa. Nina Mason Charitable Trust, Pacific Disability & Business Technical Assistance Center, U.S. DOE/RSA, U.S. Social Security Administration, Maricopa County Managed Care System, Valley of the Sun United Way and talents of many volunteers who graciously donate their time and expertise. ABIL INFORMATION & REFERRAL PHONE LIST (Assume 602 Area Code unless otherwise indicated) COMMUNITY INFORMATION & REFERRAL For all kinds of community resource information call 263-8856. This list is a summary of the community resources our consumer’s have told us they have found most useful. Many more resources exist than we have been able to include and ABIL does not endorse any particular resource. *Abuse Adult Protective Services - 255-0996 Parents Anonymous - 248-0428 Child Crisis Center - (480) 969-2308 Domestic Violence: De Colores - 269-1515 New Life - (623) 932-4404 Center Against Sexual Abuse (CASA) - 254-9000 24 hr Crisis line *Adapted Driving Evaluation and Lessons Driving to Independence, LLC - 267-9713 Contact: Jenny Nordine Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center - 239-2000 HealthSouth Meridian Point - (480)860-0671 *Advocacy - See Centers for Independent Living, P. 12 Arizona Center For Disability Law -274- 6287 / (800) 927-2260 (Has appeal grievance program for many federally funded programs, i.e., VR, ILRS, ABIL, DIRECT, New Horizons, ALTCS) Aids Project Az - 253-2437 Az Alliance for Mental Illness - 244-8166 / (800) 626-5022 Az Commission for the Deaf & Hard of Hearing- 542-3323 / (800) 352-8161 (TTY provided, Advocacy, Pub. Ed., I & R) Advocates for the Disabled - 212-2600 (Social Security appeal) Az Office for Americans with Disabilities - 542-6276 / (800) 358-3617 542-6686 TTY Disability Network of Az - (623) 842-2437 Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities - 542-4049 / (800) 889-5893 Website: www.nau.edu/~ihd/gcdd.html
  16. 16. Governor’s Council on Spinal & Head Injuries 863-0484 Pride (Parents Reestablishing Independent Development Encouragement) 623-587-9431 AZ Statewide Independent Living Council - 262-2900 AZTAP (AZ Technology Access Program) (800)477-9921 or 728-9534 Website: html://www.nau.edu/~ihd/aztap/ *AIDS Testing Maricopa County Public Health Clinic - 506-1678 Planned Parenthood - 277-7526 *Civil Rights Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) (Pacific DBTAC)- (800) 949-4232 (Region information) Disabilities Business & Tech Assistance Center) ABIL - 256-2245 / (800) 280-2245 Az Office for Americans with Disabilities - 542-6276 / (800) 358-3617 542-6686 TTY Az State Equal Employment Opportunity Commission - 640-5000 Az State Attorney General’s Office - 542-5263 *Companion Animals Canine Companions - (800) 572-2275 Companion Animals - (619) 756-8247 Eye Dog Foundation - 276-0051 Guide Dog Foundation for the Blind - (800) 548-4337 Handi Dogs - (520) 326-3412 Happy Tails - (623) 582-1135 Top Dog - (Teaches persons with disabilities to train their own dog) (520) 323-6677 ASDBA-AZ. Service Dog Brushup Association - (623) 587-7865 *Chemical Dependency/Substance Abuse Alcohol Information Center - 264-6214 AA (Phoenix) - 264-1341 (Mesa) - (480) 834-9033 (Glendale) - (623) 937-7770 Drug Abuse Access Help Line & Treatment - (800) 234-0420 Focus on Recovery Hot Line - (800) 234-0420 Also see Counseling, or Crisis Hotline *Counseling Suicide - See Crisis Hotline (below) Disability related - ABIL 256-2245 / (800) 280-2245 Value Options - 222-9444 (Behavioral health intake & referral) Community I&R - Ask for Disability Help Line (Maricopa County) - 263-8856 (Statewide) - (800) 352-3792 - Also see “Peer Support”
  17. 17. *24 hour Crisis Hotline ABS Crisis Line (Value Options) - 222-9444 / (800) 631-1314 Empact Suicide Hotline - (480) 784-1500 Samaritan Behavioral Health - (800) 254-4357 Medical Related Arizona Poison & Drug Information Center -Hotline - (800) 362-0101 Phoenix Baptist Hospital & Medical Center - 246-5555 Physician referral line, 249-01212 *Deaf Services Az Commission for the Deaf & Hard of Hearing- 542-3323(V/TTY) (Advocacy, Pub. Ed., I&R) Az Relay (800) 367-8939 TTY, (800) 842-4681 voice callers, TTY - Relay phone service statewide Valley Center for the Deaf (VCD) - 267-1921 (Interpreting services, counseling, job placement, skills training) Phoenix Library Special Needs Center - 261-8690 (Loaner Computer Assisted Note Taking System) Statewide Interpreting Service- 973-8072 *Educational Assistance ABIL Work Incentives Benefits Counseling (800) 280-2245 Vocational Rehabilitation (VR)- 266-6752/542-7878 ASU-DSR (Disabled Student Resources) - (480) 965-1234 Scottsdale Community College Disabled Student Program - (480) 423-6000 Social Security Work Incentives - (800) 772-1213 Pell Grants - Apply or call any local college Financial Aid Department *Emergency Housing & Food Referral Community I&R - 263-8856 /(800) 352-3792 Central Arizona Shelter Services (CASS) -256-6945 Salvation Army Family Services -(Family shelter 24 hrs.) - 267-4130 / 267-4122 United Methodist Outreach Ministries - 275-7852 / 275-4533 *Employment Assistance ABIL Employment Services - 667-0277 Ext 11 AZ Centers for Independent Living Social Security Work Incentive Benefit Planning and Assistance - 1-800-304-WORK (9675) statewide AZ One-Stop Career Centers Phoenix Workforce Information Network (North) 861-0208 (West) 623-247-3304 (South) 534-4732 Mesa Workforce Development Center 480-668-8262 Glendale Workforce Development Center 623-934-3231 Avondale Workforce Development Center 623-535-2735
  18. 18. Career Development Center - 861-0268 Center for New Direction - 252-0918 City of Phoenix - 534-5627 ClearPath - City of Phoenix Internships for Young Adults 495-5717/262-6091 TTY Goodwill Industries of Az - 254-2222 / 254-4003 TTY Maricopa Workforce Development - 623-934-3231 MAXIMUS - 1-866-968-7842 Ticket to Work Helpline Plus 50 Placement Center (Over 50 years old) 246-0260 Southwest Business Industry & Rehab Association (SWBIRA) 275-0180 / 275-0390 TTY Tetra Corporation - 685-9703 Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Help Line 542-7878 Vocational Rehabilitation 542-3332 TTY Chandler - 480-917-0493 Mesa - 480-962-7516 Phoenix (central) - 266-6752 Phoenix (Paseo Verde) - 564-1812 Phoenix (Southwest) - 623-873-4310 Scottsdale - 480-948-3819 Tempe 480-350-9746 Volt Services - 997-7800 Job Accommodation Hotline (For guidance on accommodations to make the workplace accessible)(800) 526-7234 www.jan.wvu.edu *Equipment / Adaptive Aids (Check with your insurance company to see if they cover adaptive aids) ILRS (Independent Living Rehab Services)- West- 789-9129, Ext. 207 East- 470-1802, Ext. 110 VR (Vocational Rehab) - 542-3332 May provide adaptive aids for employment purposes Active Mobility - 246-2717 (Phx) Amigo Mobility - 547-1842 Glendale Apria Healthcare - 282-1400 Az Technology Access Program (AZTAP) - Provides advocacy, I&R. 728-9534 / (800) 477-9921 Easter Seals Computer Placement Program - Refurbishes donated computers and distributes with basic software and training 252-6061 Health N’ Home - 1-800-645-1233 Guy Isley’s (480) 834-1234 (Mesa)/ (623) 938-4990 (Glendale) Leeden Wheelchair Lift & Sport (480) 966-2372 Phoenix Public Library Special Needs Center - 261-8690 / 254-8205 TTY (Adaptive computer equipment for visual impairment, decoders for TV for hearing
  19. 19. impaired, large type books, Braille printers, Braille and audio magazines, Kurzweil reading machine) Walgreens Health Initiative - 480-858-1000 Western Medical - 257-9347 (Phx) *Equipment Loan Easter Seals Society - 252-6061 (Technology Resource Center, Assistive Devices Loan Closet) Scottsdale Senior Center / Med-I-Loan - (480) 312-5810 Solecito (Peoria) - (623) 876-5331 Sunshine Services (Sun City) - (623) 974-2561 *Equipment Repair Amigo Mobility - (480) 890-0878 (Mesa) 547-1842 (Phx) Apria Healthcare - 282-1400 (Phx) H.P. Medical - 438-1487 (Phx) Leeden - (480) 966-2372 (Tempe) Western Medical - 257-9347 (Phx) *Financial Assistance DES (Dept. of Economic Security): General Assistance - (800) 352-8401 Food Stamps - 542-9935 Temporary Assistance to Needy Families - 542-9935 Social Security Administration - (800) 772-1213 Consumer Credit Counseling - 246-2227 Veterans Affairs Office - (800) 827-1000 - Also call the local Community Action Program (CAP) office nearest you. *Healthcare - Financial Assistance/Information AHCCCS - AZ Health Care Cost Containment System, (800) 654-8713 / 417-7200 Ask about the QMB and SLMB programs that can help pay Medicare premiums. AHCCCS Patient Advocacy - 417-4000 AHCCCS Premium Sharing Program (888) 308-6516 ALTCS (Arizona Long Term Care) (Maricopa Managed Care Systems) 417-4000 / 681-8789 TTY Medicare I&R Hotline - (800) 633-4227 Social Security - (800) 772-1213 SHIP - State Health Insurance Assistance Program 542-6446 *Housing - Affordable HUD - Low Income Housing (Projects) & Section 8 Vouchers for subsidized rent Chandler - (480) 786-2600 Flagstaff - (928) 526-0002 Glendale - (623) 930-2199/ (623)930-2180 Maricopa - 256-9651 Mesa - (480) 644-3535 Nogales - (520) 287-4138
  20. 20. Peoria - (623) 773-7140 Phoenix - 262-6952 Pinal County - (520) 868-7201 Tempe - (480) 350-8950 South Tucson - (520) 623-8481 Williams - (928) 635-4717 Winslow - (928) 289-4617 Yuma - (928) 627-8828/ (928)782-3823 *Housing - Modification ABIL- 256-2245 (Phx, Glendale, Mesa & Peoria) Foundation for Senior Living (FSL) - 285-1800 Community Services of AZ- (480) 963-6276 Independent Living Rehabilitation Services (ILRS) - 1-800-563-1221 West- 789-9129 East- 470-1802 *Home Repair Most cities have special home repair programs for free, or loans available for major repairs, i.e. roof, plumbing, etc. Call each city neighborhood improvement program. Foundation for Senior Living (FSL) - 285-1800 Community Services of AZ - (480) 963-6276 Phoenix Neighborhood Housing Rehab. - 495-0700 (Emergency repairs, weatherization, home maintenance training, landscaping and painting assistance) Local churches for volunteer(s) *Independent Living Assistance ILRS (Independent Living Rehabilitation Services/RSA/DES) 266-6752 / 542-3332 SAIL (Senior Adult Independent Living) - 264-4357 (Adult daycare, home delivered meals, personal care, home health aides, case management) Area Agency On Aging - for more information for seniors - 264-2255 DDD (Division of Developmental Disabilities) - 246-0546 *Legal Assistance Az Center For Disability Law - 274-6287 (V & TTY) / (800) 927-2260 (Advocacy for persons with all types of disabilities to gain access to needed programs and services: DDD, SMI, VR, ILRS, independent living centers, long term care) Az Community Legal Services - 258-3434 (Assist community based organizations with legal questions, e.g. drafting bylaws, review of contracts, tax status information, etc) Lawyer Referral Service - 257-4434 (Provide referrals for participating attorneys for legal advice, bilingual) *Medical Supplies
  21. 21. Apria Healthcare - 282-1400 Cactus Healthcare & Supplies - 623-995-5005 (Glendale) Health N Home - 800-645-1233 Lion’s Foundation - 244-9758 (Assistance with glasses & hearing aid repair) (Phx) Medical Mart - 249-6275 (Phx) Walgreen’s Health Initiative - 480-858-1000 Western Medical - 257-9347 (Phx) *Peer Support ABIL - Any disability (Central Az) - 256-2245 Assist to Independence - Any disability on Navajo Reservation (928) 283-6261 DIRECT - Any disability (S. Az) - (520) 624-6452 Epilepsy Society of AZ 406-3581/888-768-2690 New Horizons - Any disability (Northern Az) - (520) 772-1266 Raising Special Kids - 242-4366/800-237-3007 (For parents with children with disabilities) SMILE - Any disability (Yuma) - (928) 329-6681 SOON (Survivors On Our Own) (Phx) - 231-0071 (mental illness) Survivors United - 246-7607 (mental illness) United Spinal Cord Association 239-5929 ARC- Oasis Group (Developmental Disabilities) - 243-1787 People First (Developmental Disabilities)- 480-785-0171 pfirstofarizona4@msn.com *Personal Assistance Services (PAS)/Attendant Care ABIL - 256-2245 Assistance for Independent Living - (480) 966-9704 inhome@earthlink.net Az Long Term Care (ALTCS) - eligibility - 417-6200 Creative Networks - (480) 491-1140 Foundation for Senior Living - 285-1800 Plus 50 - 246-0260 The Health Exchange - 265-9606 *Recreation Options (And Sports) ABIL - 256-2245 / (800) 280-2245 ARCH - 230-2226 Arizona State Parks - 542-4174 ASU Adapted Recreation Program - (480) 965-3090 *Recreation Options (And Sports) continued Glendale Community College Adapted Recreation Program - (623) 845-3000 Kiwanis Recreation Center - (480) 350-5201 (Tennis and other sports) Maricopa County Parks - 506-2930 Paralyzed Veterans of America, AZ (PVA) - 244-9168/800-621-9217 azpva@aol.com Phoenix Parks & Recreation - 256-3220
  22. 22. - Also contact any local Parks and Recreation Dept, local YMCA/YWCA, Adult Day Care, or Senior Center where recreational activities are available *Sexuality Planned Parenthood - (480) 967-9414 Offices in Central/Northern Az, health care/ counseling related to sexuality, birth control, relationships. Carol Weston in Tempe office specializes in disability and sexuality education. *Transportation - All cab companies should offer lift equipped vans, but usually charge extra for them. Valley Metro (Trip planning and general information) - 253-5000 Community Forum - 223-4100 (Taxi work subsidy, curb cuts, bus problems) Dial-A-Ride: El Mirage - (623) 937-0500 Glendale - (623) 930-3500 Guadalupe Special Services - (480) 730-3092 Mesa / Chandler / Gilbert - (480) 633-0101 Paradise Valley (ADA service only) - 257-0338 Peoria - (623) 773-7435 Phoenix - 253-4000 Sun City’s Area Transit (SCAT) (623) 977-8363 Surprise - (623) 583-8979 Tempe / Scottsdale - (480) 633-0101 / (480) 813-8789 TTY Phoenix Transit - 262-7242 AAA - 437-4000 Carrier Transport - 954-7334 Super Shuttle - (800) 331-3565 / 244-9000 American Red Cross -336-6660 *Van Rental All vehicle rental companies should, under the ADA, be able to provide hand controls, and some will have accessible vans with lifts available as well. Wheelers - (800) 456-1371 (Vans) Wheelchair Getaways - 480-348-9219 (Vans) Wheelchair Van Rental - (800) 422-7382 / 480-990-9741 *Vehicle Modifications A.D.E. Industries - (520) 571-7156 (Tucson) Handicap Vehicle Specialist - 275-3325 (Phx) Leeden Wheelchair Lift & Sport - (480)966-2372 (Tempe) Wheelchair Carriers (480) 991-6002 (Scottsdale) Wheelchair Lifts, Inc. 278-0266 *Wheelchair Equipment Loan Easter Seals -252-6061 / 1- 800-626-6061 (In state only)
  23. 23. www.azseals.org INDEPENDENCE I Initiative to make changes N Never accepting barriers D Developing a plan to help myself E Ending self-defeating thoughts & behavior P Prioritizing for my own well-being E Energizing myself with a positive attitude N Nurturing relationships with friends D Daring to take responsibility for myself E Empowering myself with knowledge N Noble always in deed and thought C Caring for myself and others E Equal in a world of inequality - Nancy Daily - Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed it's the only thing that ever does. -Margret Mead- ABBREVIATIONS AAA Area Agency on Aging AARP American Association of Retired Persons ABIL Arizona Bridge to Independent Living ADA Americans with Disabilities Act ADHS Arizona State Dept of Health Services AHCCCS Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System ALTCS Arizona Long Term Care System AMA American/Arizona Medical Association APA AIDS Project Arizona APS Adult Protective Services AT Assistive Technology AZDES Arizona State Department of Economic Security BHS Behavioral Health Services CAA/CAP Community Action Agency (formerly Community Action Program) CAAA Companion Animal Association of AZ, Inc CAP Client Assistance Program CCN Community Care Network CDBG Community Development Block Grant CDC Center for Disease Control CIL Center for Independent Living CLS Community Legal Services CPS Child Protective Services (DES) DBME Division of Benefits & Medical Eligibility DDD Division of Developmental Disabilities
  24. 24. DES Department of Economic Security DHS Department of Health Services DME Durable Medical Equipment DOJ Department of Justice DOT Department of Transportation DPS Department of Public Safety EEOC Equal Employment Opportunity Commission EOD Equal Opportunity Department FAA Family Assistance Administration FSL Foundation for Senior Living GA General Assistance GCDD Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities HID Homes for Independent Disabled HIV Human Immunodeficiency Virus HUD (DEPT.) Housing & Urban Development I&R Information & Referral IDEA Individuals with Disabilities Education Act IEP Individual Education Plan ILRS Independent Living Rehabilitation Services (DES/RSA) IRS Internal Revenue Service JAA Justice Assistance Act JTPA Job Training Partnership Act MAG Maricopa Association of Governments MAPS Medical Assistance Program Services M/C - MC Maricopa County MMCS Maricopa Managed Care Systems NATL National NCD National Council on Disability NCIL National Council on IndependentLiving NHC National Health Council NOD National Organization on Disability OSHA Occupational Safety & Health Administration PACE Phoenix Advocacy Counseling for the Elderly RPTA Regional Public Transportation Authority RSA Rehabilitation Services Administration (DES) SAIL Senior Adult Independent Living SILC Statewide Independent Living Council SMI Serious Mental Illness SSA Social Security Administration SSBG Social Services Block Grant SSDI Social Security Disability Insurance SSI Supplemental Security Income TANF Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (formerly Aid to Families with Dependent Children) TDD Telecommunications Device for Deaf TTY Teletypewriter
  25. 25. VA Veterans Administration VICAP Volunteer Interfaith Caregivers Program VR Vocational Rehabilitation VSUW Valley of the Sun United Way Acknowledgments This manual was put together with suggestions and contributions from many individuals and organizations, especially ABIL’s Peer Mentor Volunteers who participated in our “Ensure Independence” early intervention program. We also thank the Flinn Foundation for their initial support in publishing the first editions. Most of all, we want to thank those we have met in rehabilitation centers who have shared their experience and knowledge about the rehabilitation process. Our intention is that this Disability Survival Manual will make the journey easier for those who follow. Contributors Don Aldrich Elizabeth Bonn George Bovine Judy Fisher ILRU Rex Kent Nick Mireles Teresa Moore John Smith Denise Thompson Carol Weston, Planned Parenthood Pam Whitaker-Lee Barbara Whitlow Barrow’s Neurological Institute St. Joseph’s Out-Patient Clinic Valley of the Sun United Way

×