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2015 Video Content Metrics Benchmark Report

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Executive Summary

In 2014, Demand Metric and Vidyard together completed an inaugural video marketing benchmark study to understand how video performs, where it is hosted, how it is measured and how viewing data works its way into the sales funnel. The 2015 study investigates these same themes, and adds some new ones as well: probing where video is used and what types of video content organizations are producing.

No survey is required to know that video remains a highly favored type of content. Instead, this study investigates aspects of video marketing to determine if marketers are gaining maturity in measuring how video content performs in key areas, such as conversion, and how well integrated video viewing data is with the systems that marketers and sales teams rely on: Marketing Automation and CRM. As mainstream as video has become in the content lineup that most companies offer, the tracking, use and integration of video consumption data does not parallel the adoption of video as a content type.

What this study determined is that success with video content marketing is not merely a product of producing quality video that engages. Success is also driven by how well video content – and metrics – is integrated with the marketing technology stack. It is no longer safe for marketers to assume that just because they are deploying video content, that it is effective. They must track that effectiveness and not simply rely on the novelty of video to create success.

Table of Contents

- Introduction
- Executive Summary
- The Importance of Video
- The Performance of Video
- Hosting & Producing Video Content
- Video Viewing Data Integration
- Video Content Budget
- Analyst Bottom Line
- Acknowledgements

- About Vidyard
- About Demand Metric
- Appendix - Survey Background

Published in: Marketing

2015 Video Content Metrics Benchmark Report

  1. 1. © 2015 Demand Metric Research Corporation. All Rights Reserved. Benchmark Report 2015 Video Content Marketing: Sponsored By:
  2. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS 3 4 6 12 17 19 Introduction Executive Summary The Importance of Video The Performance of Video Hosting & Producing Video Content Video Viewing Data Integration 28 30 31 Acknowledgements About Demand Metric Appendix – Survey Background 24 26 Video Content Budget Analyst Bottom Line 29 About Vidyard
  3. 3. INTRODUCTION In 2014, Demand Metric and Vidyard together completed an inaugural video marketing benchmark study to understand how video performs, where it is hosted, how it is measured and how viewing data works its way into the sales funnel. The 2015 study investigates these same themes, and adds some new ones as well: probing where video is used and what types of video content organizations are producing. No survey is required to know that video remains a highly favored type of content. Instead, this study investigates aspects of video marketing to determine if marketers are gaining maturity in measuring how video content performs in key areas, such as conversion, and how well integrated video viewing data is with the systems that marketers and sales teams rely on: Marketing Automation and CRM. As mainstream as video has become in the content lineup that most companies offer, the tracking, use and integration of video consumption data does not parallel the adoption of video as a content type. What this study determined is that success with video content marketing is not merely a product of producing quality video that engages. Success is also driven by how well video content – and metrics – is integrated with the marketing technology stack. It is no longer safe for marketers to assume that just because they are deploying video content, that it is effective. They must track that effectiveness and not simply rely on the novelty of video to create success. 3
  4. 4. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY A majority of this study’s participants were in marketing roles in B2B or mixed B2B/B2C organizations that reported revenue growth in the most recently completed fiscal year. Study data was collected only from participants that acknowledged using video as a form of marketing content. The analysis of this study’s data provides these key findings:  The importance of video as a content type remains high, with over 90% of respondents reporting that video is becoming more important.  Over three-fourths of respondents are using video on their websites and in their social media channels.  The most common types of videos respondents are producing are “explainer” and product feature videos.  Video content produces conversions better than other forms of content for 74% of respondents.  Half of the respondents report that the ROI of video is getting better. The percent reporting improving ROI jumps to 70% for sales teams that use video viewing data to qualify leads, engage prospects or influence specific deals.  72% of respondents are using no or only basic measures of video content effectiveness, giving them no way to accurately determine ROI. 4
  5. 5. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  Just 15% of respondents have integrated video viewing data with key sales and marketing systems, and are exploiting the data from that integration. While this figure is low, it has almost doubled from 2014 when it was just 9%.  Respondents who have integrated video viewing data – and are using it – are almost twice as likely to report that the ROI of video is getting better compared to those who have not integrated this data. This report details the results and insights from the analysis of the study data. For more detail on the survey participants, please refer to the Appendix. 5
  6. 6. 0% 5% 95% 1% 8% 91% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Less important Not changing More important The Importance of Video as Marketing Content 2014 2015 Figure 1: For almost everyone surveyed, video as a content type continues to grow in importance. THE IMPORTANCE OF VIDEO 2015 Video Content Metrics Benchmark Study, Demand Metric, October 2015, n=174 6 As a content type, video is far more prevalent than it was even in the recent past. Often, the popularity of a content type can render it less effective, but this 2015 study shows that video has staying power and its importance continues to grow: it has not lost its ability to differentiate. Even as a mainstream form of content, video’s importance continues to grow as Figure 1 summarizes. If there is any doubt about the popularity and importance of video content, the data in Figure 1 quickly removes that doubt. The current perception matches the reality: virtually the entire marketing community acknowledges that video is still growing in importance as a type of marketing and sales content.
  7. 7. 25% 26% 32% 9% 8% 27% 26% 31% 11% 5% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% Less than 5 5 to 10 11 to 50 51 to 100 More than 100 Marketing Videos Produced Annually 2015 2014 The study also tracked the quantity of videos that are being produced annually. Figure 2 shows a year-to-year comparison of this video volume production data. Over half of organizations that participated in this study produce between 5 to 50 videos annually for marketing purposes. Interestingly enough, the number of organizations producing more than 50 videos annually remained virtually the same, 16% in 2015 compared to 17% in 2014. 7 Figure 2: The annual pace at which study respondents are producing video has changed little year- to-year, with the 11-50 category still in the lead. 2015 Video Content Metrics Benchmark Study, Demand Metric, October 2015, n=174 THE IMPORTANCE OF VIDEO
  8. 8. 35% 27% 22% 10% 6% 11% 21% 57% 8% 3% 5% 45% 30% 15% 5% 0% 20% 40% 60% Less than 5 5 to 10 11 to 50 51 to 100 More than 100 Videos Produced Annually by Company Revenue Large Medium Small As was the case in 2014, there are differences in video production volume based on company size. Company size is determined by annual revenue, where small companies are those reporting $25 million or less, medium companies between $26 and $500 million, and large companies over $500 million. Figure 3 displays a breakdown of the data from Figure 2 by company size, using annual revenue to categorize responding companies by size. Small companies are seven times more likely than large companies, and three times more likely than mid- sized companies, to indicate that they produce less than 5 videos annually. Surprisingly, small companies are also the most likely to be producing more than 100 videos annually as shown in Figure 3. 75%, or more, of mid-sized and large companies are maintaining video production at 5-50 videos annually for marketing purposes. 8 Figure 3: 71% of study participants say that video converts somewhat better or much better than other content types. 2015 Video Content Metrics Benchmark Study, Demand Metric, October 2015, n=174 THE IMPORTANCE OF VIDEO
  9. 9. 5% 15% 22% 40% 43% 53% 76% 81% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Other Dedicated video network Sales conversation Emails Recorded webinars Landing pages Social media Website Where Video Content is Used Figure 4: Websites and social media pages are the preferred places to use video. The 2015 study explored some new dimensions about the use of video, the first of which was where video is deployed, which Figure 4 summarizes. While video content is most often used on websites and in social media, the write-in comments for the “Other” response option provided by survey participants reveal how pervasive video has become. According to these write-in comments, video is being used in press releases, in Google virtual tours and for distribution on USB drives. 9 2015 Video Content Metrics Benchmark Study, Demand Metric, October 2015, n=174 THE IMPORTANCE OF VIDEO
  10. 10. 7% 20% 34% 38% 38% 43% 59% 59% 0% 20% 40% 60% Other video types Cultural content Live-action videos Talking head style videos Thought leader interviews Customer testimonials Product feature videos Explainer videos Type of Videos 10 As varied as where video is used is the type of videos that marketers are creating and deploying. Figure 5 shows this variety and distribution. More than half of organizations participating in the study are utilizing explainer and product feature videos as part of their video content efforts. THE IMPORTANCE OF VIDEO 2015 Video Content Metrics Benchmark Study, Demand Metric, October 2015, n=174 Figure 5: Explainer and product feature videos are in use by a majority of survey respondents.
  11. 11. Where videos are used (Figure 4) and which types of videos are in use (Figure 5) are correlated. Figure 6 shows the top three types of videos used for each distribution option. Cultural content videos rank next-to-last in Figure 5 for usage, but the analysis of this study’s data revealed an interesting relationship. The percentage of respondents producing more than 100 videos annually (Figure 2) is low, at 5% in 2015. However, this group has the highest incidence of producing cultural content videos. In fact, this type of video ties with product feature videos as the most heavily produced. Whatever the reason, the group that is prolific in terms of video production puts a strong emphasis on projecting who they are and what they believe in by way of cultural content videos. Landing Pages Emails Website Social Media Dedicated Video Network Recorded Webinars Sales Conversation 1 Explainer Product Feature Product Feature Product Feature Product Feature Explainer Product Feature 2 Product Feature Explainer Explainer Explainer Explainer Product Feature Explainer 3 Customer Testimonial Customer Testimonial Customer Testimonial Customer Testimonial Talking Head Style Thought Leader Content Customer Testimonial Figure 6: The top three types of videos in use by place of use. 2015 Video Content Metrics Benchmark Study, Demand Metric, October 2015, n=174 THE IMPORTANCE OF VIDEO 11
  12. 12. 0% 2% 27% 52% 19% 0% 6% 20% 51% 23% 0% 20% 40% 60% Much worse Somewhat worse About the same Somewhat better Much better Conversion Performance of Video 2015 2014 Video has proven an exceptional content type to support all stages of the buyer’s journey. When a conversion occurs, it marks a pivotal point in the buyer’s journey, either from prospect to qualified prospect, or from qualified prospect to customer. For this reason, this study examined how well video produces conversions compared to other types of content, and Figure 7 shows this conversion performance. When producing conversions is a goal of content marketing efforts, video is a proven performer; and its performance is improving. 12 Figure 7: 74% of study participants report that video converts better than other content types, a slight increase over 2014. THE PERFORMANCE OF VIDEO 2015 Video Content Metrics Benchmark Study, Demand Metric, October 2015, n=174
  13. 13. Figure 8: Half of the study’s participants report that the ROI of video is getting better. 13 A conversion is a precursor to revenue, and video’s strong conversion performance implies that it should have a correspondingly strong return-on-investment (ROI). As Figure 8 shows, the ROI of video, like its conversion performance, is also improving. The ROI of video is related to how well it produces conversions (Figure 7), but also to the extent to which the sales team uses video viewing data. Figure 8 shows that 50% of study participants report that the ROI of video is getting better, a slight improvement over 2014. This ROI effect increases to 70% for organizations when their sales teams, to some or a great extent, use video viewing data to qualify leads, engage prospects or influence specific deals. 2015 Video Content Metrics Benchmark Study, Demand Metric, October 2015, n=174 THE PERFORMANCE OF VIDEO 26% 1% 25% 48% 26% 1% 23% 50% 0% 20% 40% 60% Unknown Declining Staying the same Getting better How is the ROI of Video Changing? 2015 2014
  14. 14. If there is a concern about the data in Figure 8, it is that over one-fourth of organizations do not know the ROI they’re getting from their video content. It’s quite possible to determine the ROI for video content. If organizations don’t know what the ROI is, it is because they choose not to measure it, not because the data is unavailable. Knowing ROI – and other performance metrics of video – is a function of tracking the proper metrics. This study measured the usage of the three, broad categories of effectiveness metrics: 1. Basic: these are measures of consumption, such as views or shares, and they are relatively easy to capture. However, these metrics don’t allow determination of ROI, nor do they provide indicators of engagement. For these reasons, their usefulness is limited. 2. Intermediate: these are basic measures of engagement, such as average viewing duration. With intermediate metrics, insights into video viewing behavior begin to emerge. 3. Advanced: these metrics include views by embed location, viewer drop-off rates, viewing heat maps or attribution to sales pipeline. With these metrics, precise determinations are possible regarding revenue impact and ROI. These categories of metrics are related to levels of maturity in video marketing. As the more advanced metrics see use, the video marketing maturity also increases. 14 THE PERFORMANCE OF VIDEO
  15. 15. 14% 48% 24% 14% 23% 49% 14% 14% 0% 20% 40% 60% None Basic Intermediate Advanced Video Content Effectiveness Measures in Use 2015 2014 15 Figure 9 summarizes the usage of the metrics that were identified and defined on the previous page of this report to measure video marketing effectiveness. Figure 9 presents an opportunity regarding metrics to view the glass as half full or half empty. Because metrics are so crucial to any form of marketing success, this report will view the results of Figure 9 pessimistically. Almost one-fourth of organizations surveyed have no video effectiveness measures in place, and almost half are using only basic ones. This means that about three- quarters of the participants have no means of precisely determining the ROI of their video marketing efforts. Worse, the percentage of companies not using any measures of video performance has increased from 2014. This is not an encouraging trend. Intermediate or advanced metrics are necessary to understand how video content is engaging the target audience. THE PERFORMANCE OF VIDEO 2015 Video Content Metrics Benchmark Study, Demand Metric, October 2015, n=174 Figure 9: There is no increase year-to-year in the use of advanced metrics.
  16. 16. As an organization produces an increasing number of videos, it discovers the need to use more advanced measures to understand how those videos engage. Figure 10 depicts the correlation between the type of measure in use and the annual volume of videos produced. Organizations that were part of this study and also use advanced metrics are producing more marketing videos: 81% produce 11 or more annually. This compares to just 36% for those using no measurements. The conclusion about this relationship between measurements and production volume is that advanced measurements become imperative at high production volumes to tune performance and truly understand ROI on the larger investment made in producing them. Less than 5 Videos Produced Annually 5 to 10 Videos Produced Annually 11 to 50 Videos Produced Annually 51 to 100 Videos Produced Annually More than 100 Videos Produced Annually No Metrics 50% 7% 23% 12% 0% Basic Metrics 40% 68% 47% 31% 37% Intermediate Metrics 10% 15% 10% 19% 50% Advanced Metrics 0% 10% 20% 38% 13% Figure 10: As annual video production volumes rise, so does the use of more advanced metrics. 2015 Video Content Metrics Benchmark Study, Demand Metric, October 2015, n=174 THE PERFORMANCE OF VIDEO
  17. 17. 20% 36% 44% 20% 38% 42% 0% 20% 40% 60% External: agencies, studios, freelancers or contract employees Internal staff & resources Combination of internal & external resources Video Production Resources 2015 2014 17 This study finds that at present, brands will continue to rely heavily on external channels for hosting and distribution of video, rather than on internally owned web properties. At the same time, brands recognize the need to bring visitors to their own sites to watch video content rather than sending them away to 3rd party channels. They want to offer a simple, yet elegant, viewing experience in an environment that they control, and one that is secure. Even recently, video was considered one of the most difficult and expensive forms of content to produce, requiring specialized skills and expensive technology to get quality results. Quite often, organizations did not have the resources in-house to produce quality video. Today, video is much easier to produce and the resource picture is very different. Figure 11 shows the year-to-year change from where most video production resources come. HOSTING & PRODUCING VIDEO CONTENT 2015 Video Content Metrics Benchmark Study, Demand Metric, October 2015, n=174 Figure 11: Little has changed regarding video production resources.
  18. 18. Conventional wisdom might suggest that large companies, because they have the most resources, are most likely to solely use internal resources for video production. In fact, large companies have the greatest incidence of external resource usage for this purpose. Small companies are most likely to do video production with their own, internal resources quite probably because it is easier than ever to keep costs low by creating introductory-quality video in-house. Mid-sized companies are the least likely to solely rely on external resources. The future direction for video production resources is away from internal resources toward external resources, or a blend of internal and external. 18 HOSTING & PRODUCING VIDEO CONTENT
  19. 19. 20% 29% 26% 16% 9% 22% 23% 25% 15% 15% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% No plans to integrate Planning to integrate sometime Planning to integrate within 12 months Integrated but not exploiting the data Integrated & exploiting the data Integration Status of Video Viewing Data 2015 2014 VIDEO VIEWING DATA INTEGRATION 19 Video content exists less on an island, with no integration into key marketing and sales systems, and more as a fully integrated part of a content marketing strategy. The integration of video viewing data with marketing automation and CRM systems is imperative. This integration enables marketers to track the more advanced measurements (Figure 9) and provides sales teams with practical insights about sales funnel leads from video consumption data. Virtually all who responded to this study – 92% – agreed that having video viewing data about individual leads in the sales funnel was of value. Figure 12 displays the current state of video viewing data integration with marketing automation and/or CRM systems. The total number of organizations in this study that have integrated video viewing data into their marketing automation and CRM systems is relatively low, but it is growing at a high rate. Figure 12: The number of organizations that have integrated viewing data with marketing automation and/or CRM systems – and are exploiting it – has increased year-to-year. 2015 Video Content Metrics Benchmark Study, Demand Metric, October 2015, n=174
  20. 20. 31% 2% 21% 46% 4% 0% 13% 83% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Unknown Declining Staying the same Getting better Integration of Video Viewing Data & ROI No integration Integration & data exploitation 20 There is a strong correlation between the integration of this viewing data and ROI. To fully understand video ROI, it is necessary to integrate this viewing data into key systems. This necessity appears in Figure 13, which shows the dramatic difference in how ROI is changing (Figure 8) for companies that have completed integration – and are using the data (Figure 12) – and those that have not. The contrasts in Figure 13 are dramatic. 54% of those that have not integrated video viewing data into marketing automation and/or CRM systems report that the ROI of their video marketing is unknown, declining or staying the same. For those that have completed the integration and are exploiting it, over 80% report that their ROI is getting better. Furthermore, only 4% of the integrated group does not know how the ROI is changing, while almost a third of the non-integrated group don’t know this. The message is clear: if you want to understand what kind of ROI is coming from video, you must integrate viewing data with key marketing and sales systems. And when this integration is complete and providing data, the news about video ROI is very good. Figure 13: Those who have integrated video viewing data with marketing automation and/or CRM systems are almost twice as likely to report that the ROI of video is getting better. VIDEO VIEWING DATA INTEGRATION 2015 Video Content Metrics Benchmark Study, Demand Metric, October 2015, n=174
  21. 21. 2% 3% 15% 47% 33% 2% 3% 19% 46% 30% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% Very unimportant Somewhat unimportant Neutral Somewhat important Very important Importance of Viewing Data for Lead Scoring 2014 2015 21 One reason this connection between integrated viewing data and ROI is so strong is because this integration enables this data to help score and qualify leads in the sales funnel. It is a powerful thing for members of the sales team to know the viewing profile of individual leads: which videos leads have seen, viewing duration, repeat views, sharing and other metrics associated with video consumption. Figure 14 shares how important survey participants feel that it is to integrate video viewing data with their lead scoring or marketing automation workflows. Figure 14 confirms that for over 75% of organizations, the value of integrating video viewing data with lead scoring or marketing automation workflows is high. However, Figure 12 provides the current state of this integration: just 30% of surveyed organizations have completed it, and only half of them are exploiting the data. Marketers have an opportunity to prove and grow the ROI of their video marketing efforts by completing this integration. VIDEO VIEWING DATA INTEGRATION Figure 14: Over three-fourths of study participants feel this integration is important. 2015 Video Content Metrics Benchmark Study, Demand Metric, October 2015, n=174
  22. 22. 22 Another major benefit of integrating video viewing data with key marketing and sales systems is the metrics the integration enables. Figure 9 shares the current status quo for video measurements: the use of advanced metrics that provide true indicators of engagement is low. Figure 15 shows how video measurement usage changes when video viewing data is integrated. The implied message of Figure 15 is that organizations that have completed this integration and are using the data it provides have a much better view of engagement with their video content. With integration, usage of intermediate and advanced measures is over twice the rate for organizations with no integration of this viewing data. Usage of advanced measures is occurring at almost three times the rate! This precise understanding of engagement, enabled by more advanced measurement data, is just one of the many fruits of video viewing data integration. Figure 15: Integration of video viewing data enables higher usage of intermediate and advanced measurements for survey participants. VIDEO VIEWING DATA INTEGRATION 2015 Video Content Metrics Benchmark Study, Demand Metric, October 2015, n=174 23% 49% 14% 14% 8% 33% 21% 38% 0% 20% 40% 60% None Basic Intermediate Advanced Integration of Video Viewing Data & Metrics No integration Integration & data exploitation
  23. 23. 11% 37% 22% 24% 6% 10% 34% 18% 32% 6% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% I don't know To no extent To a slight extent To some extent To a great extent Sales Use of Viewing Data to Influence Deals 2015 2014 23 A practical benefit of the integration discussed in this section of the report is the ability it provides the sales team to easily access and use video viewing data to qualify leads, engage prospects or influence specific deals. Figure 16 shares the extent to which sales teams in this study are using video viewing data for this purpose. The number of sales organizations in this study whose team members use video viewing data to work with prospects is growing. This increased usage is certainly related to the higher rate of video viewing data integration that occurred this year (Figure 12). Making viewing data available via integration through the systems that sales and marketing teams use removes the biggest barrier to practical use of this data. VIDEO VIEWING DATA INTEGRATION 2015 Video Content Metrics Benchmark Study, Demand Metric, October 2015, n=174 Figure 16: The extent to which sales teams use video viewing data has increased year-to-year.
  24. 24. VIDEO CONTENT BUDGET 24 Where marketers spend their limited funds says much about their priorities. The investment pattern that this study discovered confirms that video content is a high priority for most marketing departments. Figure 17 shares the relative growth of video content budgets over the past two years. Budgets for creating video content continue to grow, and there has even been a slight acceleration in the rate of increase between 2014 and 2015. Viewing this budget data from Figure 17, just for the 69% of participants that indicated their video content budgets are increasing, these characteristics emerge:  Conversion performance (Figure 7): 83% of companies that are increasing their video content budgets report slightly or significantly better conversion performance of video content, compared to other types. The comparable conversion performance rate for the full sample is 74%.  Volume (Figure 2): Almost two-thirds of this budget increase will come in organizations that make between 5 and 50 videos annually. Figure 17: Even one year later, just as many study participants predict that their video content budgets will continue growing. 2015 Video Content Metrics Benchmark Study, Demand Metric, October 2015, n=174 1% 2% 28% 53% 16% 0% 2% 29% 49% 20% 0% 20% 40% 60% Significantly decreasing Slightly decreasing Staying the same Slightly increasing Significantly increasing Video Content Budget 2014 2015
  25. 25. Figure 18: Increased video budgets correlate to having viewing data for leads in the sales funnel. VIDEO CONTENT BUDGET 25 In this study, 41% of participants indicated that it was of great value to have video viewing data about individual leads in their sales funnels. This perception of value carries over into their willingness to budget for creating video content. Figure 18 shows the budget data from Figure 17, filtered for just this 41% in the full survey sample. Video continues to have strong momentum and organizations are allocating more of their marketing budgets to video. Video’s ability to convert (Figure 7) is improving, as is its ROI performance (Figure 8), and those results are leading marketers to invest more in producing video content. 2015 Video Content Metrics Benchmark Study, Demand Metric, October 2015, n=174 2% 29% 69% 0% 19% 81% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Decrease Staying the same Increase Budget Comparison All Respondents Respondents placing great value on having video viewing data for leads in the funnel
  26. 26. ANALYST BOTTOM LINE The benefits and performance of video as a content type were strong in the 2014 study, and in 2015 the story for video has become even better. Organizations that are not yet exploiting video as part of their content strategy, or those that are just dabbling with it, should give serious consideration to making video the centerpiece of their content mix. As marketers expand their use of video, they need to recognize the factors that are critical to achieving the best results. Success with video involves much more than just producing quality video and making it available through the right hosting or marketing platforms. Those organizations that are achieving stellar results from their video marketing efforts are doing three things beyond focusing on production quality:  Integrating video viewing data. This study has shown that the best conversion and ROI results are the result of integrating video viewing data with marketing automation and CRM systems that marketing and sales teams use regularly. Integrating viewing data opens up a new collection of insights about viewers that allow Marketing to better nurture leads and cultivate advocates. Sales can use viewing data to discern the disposition of individual leads in the sales funnel, using this data to help qualify leads, engage prospects and influence specific deals. In order for these things to occur, viewing data integration must exist, so choosing a video hosting or marketing platform that makes this integration possible is a prerequisite.  Measuring the right things. Marketing is becoming more data driven, and video is an aspect of marketing that benefits from tracking the right metrics, and then doing something with that data. Figure 9 presents a rather bleak picture with respect to the current state of video content metrics, with 72% of participants using no measurements or only basic ones. Those who are using intermediate (e.g. average viewing duration) or advanced (e.g. views by embed location, viewer drop-off rates, attribution to sales pipeline) metrics are getting better results because they’re using the performance data to drive better engagement. Engagement leads to more of the desired behaviors: sharing and conversion, which boosts ROI. Marketers cannot allow themselves to remain in the dark about how well their video content is driving engagement.
  27. 27. ANALYST BOTTOM LINE  Controlling the brand. There are free, ubiquitous, video-hosting platforms that are easy to use, with YouTube heading up this list. It is fine to exploit these platforms; and they provide some benefits in the area of search marketing. What they don’t do, however, is allow the marketer that uses them to have full control over their brand or the viewer’s experience. They also don’t automatically drive traffic to the brand’s website. When marketers have optimizing the presentation of the brand or driving traffic to the brand’s web properties as objectives, then marketers must consider a video hosting or marketing platform that allows them to do this. Many types of content have their “day in the sun” and then lose their luster. Video has not yet reached its apex; its appeal and allure are fully intact and continue to grow. Marketers that wisely exploit video by using a platform that simplifies integrating viewing data and enables the tracking of advanced measures can expect exceptional results. 27
  28. 28. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Demand Metric is grateful to Vidyard for sponsoring this benchmarking study and for those participants that took the time to provide their input to it. 28
  29. 29. ABOUT VIDYARD If video is part of your marketing strategy, you need a way to measure its impact on revenue. As the world’s leading video marketing platform, Vidyard can show you exactly how viewers interact with your videos. This means you can continuously improve your marketing strategy based on measurable results. Along with hosting your video content, Vidyard reveals who’s watching your videos, and for how long with detailed viewer analytics and engagement data you can push directly into your MAP and CRM. Transform viewers into customers today. For more information, visit www.vidyard.com. 29
  30. 30. ABOUT DEMAND METRIC Demand Metric is a marketing research and advisory firm serving a membership community of over 70,000 marketing professionals and consultants in 75 countries. Offering consulting methodologies, advisory services, and 500+ premium marketing tools and templates, Demand Metric resources and expertise help the marketing community plan more efficiently and effectively, answer the difficult questions about their work with authority and conviction and complete marketing projects more quickly and with greater confidence, boosting the respect of the marketing team and making it easier to justify resources the team needs to succeed. To learn more about Demand Metric, please visit: www.demandmetric.com. 30
  31. 31. APPENDIX – SURVEY BACKGROUND This 2015 Video Content Marketing Metrics Benchmark Study survey was administered online during the period of July 6 through September 6, 2015. During this period, 207 responses were collected, 174 of which were complete enough for inclusion in the analysis. The representativeness of these results depends on the similarity of the sample to environments in which this survey data is used for comparison or guidance. Summarized below is the basic categorization data collected about respondents to enable filtering and analysis of the data: Annual Sales:  $10 million or less (50%)  $11 to $25 million (10%)  $26 to $100 million (16%)  $101 to $500 million (9%)  $501 million to $1 billion (7%)  Over $1 billion (8%) Type of Organization:  Mostly or entirely B2B (49%)  Mostly or entirely B2C (11%)  Blend of B2B/B2C (31%)  Agency or Studio (9%) Primary Role of Respondent:  President, CEO or Owner (31%)  Marketing (55%)  Sales (4%)  Other (10%) Revenue Growth (in most recent fiscal year):  Significant increase (17%)  Modest increase (56%)  Flat (21%)  Modest decline (5%)  Significant decline (1%)
  32. 32. For more information, visit us at: www.demandmetric.com © 2013 Demand Metric Research Corporation. All Rights Reserved. Benchmark Report © 2015 Demand Metric Research Corporation. All Rights Reserved. Demand Metric Research Corporation 584 Forest Creek Place London, ON, Canada N5Y 5T7

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