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Promoting Career Studies  in  Theory and Practice (A Conversation) Michael B Arthur Suffolk University, Boston, MA
 
The meaning of “career” <ul><li>A person's course or progress through life  esp.  when publicly conspicuous, or abounding ...
Career Studies <ul><li>Twin points of departure </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Vocational guidance (1900s) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><...
The Chicago School <ul><li>Everett Hughes (1957): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Objective  and  subjective sides of the career </l...
The MIT initiative <ul><li>Bailyn, Schein & Van Maanen (1970s) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A “curious hiatus” between psychologi...
The MIT Initiative <ul><li>Definition of  career development: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ [A] lifelong process of working out ...
Beyond the MIT Initiative <ul><li>Handbook of Career Theory (1989) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Current vs. “new” perspectives </...
Two continuing traditions Schools of Education Schools of Management Organizations Occupations The economy A B C D E F G E...
 
Where to go? <ul><li>The global knowledge economy </li></ul><ul><li>Enjoy  interdisciplinary  conversations </li></ul>
The global knowledge-driven economy <ul><li>Knowledge-based careers </li></ul><ul><li>Virtual careers </li></ul><ul><li>Ca...
Interdisciplinary Conversations? <ul><li>What do people talk about? </li></ul><ul><li>What do scholars talk about? </li></ul>
Three “ways of knowing” Knowing- why: Identity, interests, motivation Knowing- how: Skills and expertise Knowing- whom:  R...
Scholarly conversations? Knowing- why: Identity, interests, motivation Knowing- how: Skills and expertise Knowing- whom:  ...
Scholarly conversations? Knowing- why: Identity, interests, motivation Knowing- how: Skills and expertise Knowing- whom:  ...
Scholarly conversations? Knowing- why: Identity, interests, motivation Knowing- how: Skills and expertise Knowing- whom:  ...
Scholarly conversations? Knowing- why: Identity, interests, motivation Knowing- how: Skills and expertise Knowing- whom:  ...
Scholarly conversations? Knowing- why: Identity, interests, motivation Knowing- how: Skills and expertise Knowing- whom:  ...
Scholarly conversations? Knowing- why: Identity, interests, motivation Knowing- how: Skills and expertise Knowing- whom:  ...
Knowing-how:   Individual skills and expertise Knowing-whom: Relationships and reputation Why do we work?  Scholarly conve...
Career Studies as  Interdisciplinary <ul><li>The bad news </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Separate  conversations, partial solutions...
 
Career studies <ul><li>Let’s start that shared conversation </li></ul><ul><li>and </li></ul><ul><li>Let’s keep it going! <...
<ul><li>Questions? </li></ul>
<ul><li>References: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Arthur, M. B. (2008). Examining contemporary careers: a call for interdisciplina...
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Professor Michael Arthur career studies sep 02 09

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Intelligent career exploration (ICCS) - the world is changing and career management is becoming more complex for individuals from all walks of life. A theoretical concept with practical application, particularly for those working with adults in private and public sector arenas.

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Professor Michael Arthur career studies sep 02 09

  1. 1. Promoting Career Studies in Theory and Practice (A Conversation) Michael B Arthur Suffolk University, Boston, MA
  2. 3. The meaning of “career” <ul><li>A person's course or progress through life esp. when publicly conspicuous, or abounding in remarkable incidents.  </li></ul><ul><li>    </li></ul><ul><li>A course of professional life or employment, which affords opportunity for progress or advancement in the world. </li></ul><ul><li>The consequence of “vocational choice” – understanding the self, the requirements for success, and reasoning between these. </li></ul><ul><li>The sequence and combination of roles that a person plays during the course of a lifetime. </li></ul><ul><li>The evolving sequence of a person’s work experiences over time. </li></ul>
  3. 4. Career Studies <ul><li>Twin points of departure </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Vocational guidance (1900s) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Chicago School of Sociology (1930s) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) initiative (1970s) </li></ul>
  4. 5. The Chicago School <ul><li>Everett Hughes (1957): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Objective and subjective sides of the career </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interdependence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Individual identities and social roles </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Career processes and transitions </li></ul><ul><li>Forerunner of Karl Weick’s enactment , Anthony Giddens’ structuration </li></ul>
  5. 6. The MIT initiative <ul><li>Bailyn, Schein & Van Maanen (1970s) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A “curious hiatus” between psychological, sociological perspectives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A call for rapprochement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A missed opportunity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Management school outcomes </li></ul></ul>
  6. 7. The MIT Initiative <ul><li>Definition of career development: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ [A] lifelong process of working out a synthesis between individual interests and the opportunities (or limitations) present in the external work-related environment, so that both individual and environmental objectives are fulfilled.” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Van Maanen and Schein (1977) </li></ul></ul>
  7. 8. Beyond the MIT Initiative <ul><li>Handbook of Career Theory (1989) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Current vs. “new” perspectives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Trait-factor theories” vs. other approaches </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The Boundaryless Career (1996) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Looking outside single institutional (organizational or occupational) settings </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Handbook of Career Studies (2007) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Expanded treatments of contexts, institutions, synthesis </li></ul></ul>
  8. 9. Two continuing traditions Schools of Education Schools of Management Organizations Occupations The economy A B C D E F G Educational vs. Management School Approaches to Careers (Arthur, 2008)
  9. 11. Where to go? <ul><li>The global knowledge economy </li></ul><ul><li>Enjoy interdisciplinary conversations </li></ul>
  10. 12. The global knowledge-driven economy <ul><li>Knowledge-based careers </li></ul><ul><li>Virtual careers </li></ul><ul><li>Career communities </li></ul><ul><li>Identity development </li></ul><ul><li>Social capital </li></ul><ul><li>Global careers </li></ul><ul><li>Lost gains vs. new opportunities </li></ul>
  11. 13. Interdisciplinary Conversations? <ul><li>What do people talk about? </li></ul><ul><li>What do scholars talk about? </li></ul>
  12. 14. Three “ways of knowing” Knowing- why: Identity, interests, motivation Knowing- how: Skills and expertise Knowing- whom: Relationships and reputation
  13. 15. Scholarly conversations? Knowing- why: Identity, interests, motivation Knowing- how: Skills and expertise Knowing- whom: Relationships and reputation Vocational guidance
  14. 16. Scholarly conversations? Knowing- why: Identity, interests, motivation Knowing- how: Skills and expertise Knowing- whom: Relationships and reputation Vocational guidance Job design
  15. 17. Scholarly conversations? Knowing- why: Identity, interests, motivation Knowing- how: Skills and expertise Knowing- whom: Relationships and reputation Leadership theory
  16. 18. Scholarly conversations? Knowing- why: Identity, interests, motivation Knowing- how: Skills and expertise Knowing- whom: Relationships and reputation Leadership theory Socio-technical systems
  17. 19. Scholarly conversations? Knowing- why: Identity, interests, motivation Knowing- how: Skills and expertise Knowing- whom: Relationships and reputation Sociology
  18. 20. Scholarly conversations? Knowing- why: Identity, interests, motivation Knowing- how: Skills and expertise Knowing- whom: Relationships and reputation Sociology Psychological attachment
  19. 21. Knowing-how: Individual skills and expertise Knowing-whom: Relationships and reputation Why do we work? Scholarly conversations?
  20. 22. Career Studies as Interdisciplinary <ul><li>The bad news </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Separate conversations, partial solutions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Career actors, counselors left to improvise </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The good news </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We’re talking! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Theorists and practitioners </li></ul></ul><ul><li>There’s an opportunity! </li></ul>
  21. 24. Career studies <ul><li>Let’s start that shared conversation </li></ul><ul><li>and </li></ul><ul><li>Let’s keep it going! </li></ul>
  22. 25. <ul><li>Questions? </li></ul>
  23. 26. <ul><li>References: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Arthur, M. B. (2008). Examining contemporary careers: a call for interdisciplinary inquiry. Human Relations, 61 , 163 - 186. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Arthur, M. B., Hall, D. T. & Lawrence, B. S. (1989) Handbook of Career Theory . Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Arthur, M. B. & Rousseau, D. M. (1996) The Boundaryless Career . Oxford: Oxford University Press. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Giddens, A. (1984) The Constitution of Society. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gunz, H. & Peiperl, M. (2007) Handbook of Career Studies . Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hughes, E. C. (1958). Men and Their Work. Glencoe, IL: Free Press. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parker, Khapova and Arthur (in press) The intelligent career framework as a basis for interdisciplinary inquiry, Journal of Vocational Behavior . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Super, D. E. Life career roles: self-realization in work and leisure. In D. T. Hall & Associates, Career Development in Organizations , San Francisco, Jossey Bass, pp. 95-119 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Van Maanen, J, & Schein, E. H. (1977). Career development. In J. R. Hackman & J. L. Suttle (Eds.) Improving Life at Work: Behavioral Science Approaches to Organizational Change , 30-95. Santa Monica, CA: Goodyear. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Weick, K. E. (1996). Enactment and the boundaryless career: organizing as we work. In M. B. Arthur, & D. M. Rousseau (Eds.), The Boundaryless Career . New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 40-57 </li></ul></ul>

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