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Hypnosis
Submitted to: Submitted by:
Dr. Sapna Sharma Deepak
Roll no –
1517
M.Sc. Forensic
Sc(P)
o History of Hypnosis
o Hypnosis
o State of Hypnosis
o Techniques of Hypnosis
o Requirements of Hypnosis
o Theories of Hyp...
 People have been entering hypnotic-
type trances for thousands and
thousands of years - meditation
(religion).
 Scienti...
Why is Hypnosis Relevant in Criminal
Investigations?
Context present in the 1970s supported
the active use of hypnosis b...
 Between October 1977 and 1978, 10 young women were
raped, tortured, and strangled to death. Their bodies
were found at v...
Hypnotists say that subjects under hypnosis are a lot like little
kids: playful and imaginative, fully embracing bizarre
s...
What is it?
What are the states of hypnosis?
What are the techniques & requirements of
hypnosis?
 What are some major ...
An altered state of consciousness during
which an individual demonstrates
heightened susceptibility to suggestions or
com...
How?
Hypnosis is a way to access a person's
subconscious mind directly.
Theorized that deep relaxation and focusing
exer...
 Before hypnotists bring a subject into a full
trance, they generally test the willingness and
capacity to be hypnotized....
Trance State- characterized by extreme suggestibility,
relaxation and heightened imagination
Heightened State of Awarene...
 Techniques:
Fixed-gaze induction or eye fixation
Rapid
Progressive relaxation and imagery
Loss of balance
 Requirements:
The subject must want to be hypnotized.
The subject must believe they can be
hypnotized.
The subject mu...
Role Theory
State theory
Dissociation Theory
According to role theory, hypnosis does not
create a special state of consciousness.
The procedures for inducing hypnosi...
According to state theory, hypnosis creates
an altered state of consciousness.
Evidence for this perspective comes from
...
According to this theory, hypnosis is not
one specific state, but rather a general
condition in which people reorganize t...
 Increased suggestibility (People are more
likely to carry out behaviours and experience
feelings and perceptions-even if...
HYPNOSIS AND MEMORY
FACILITATION
 The view that hypnosis does not induce a state
of automatism could be seen as good news...
o Highly Suggestible BUT your sense of
safety and mortality remain - the hypnotist
cannot make you do something you don’t
...
Forensic hypnotism, investigators access
a subject's deep, repressed memories of a
past crime to help identify a suspect ...
http://homepages.rpi.edu/~kalshm/fs/week
5.html
http://ericahutton.blogspot.in/2011/05/apply
ing-hypnosis-as-forensic-st...
 hypnosis
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hypnosis

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hypnosis

  1. 1. Hypnosis Submitted to: Submitted by: Dr. Sapna Sharma Deepak Roll no – 1517 M.Sc. Forensic Sc(P)
  2. 2. o History of Hypnosis o Hypnosis o State of Hypnosis o Techniques of Hypnosis o Requirements of Hypnosis o Theories of Hypnosis o Effects of Hypnosis o Key Points o Forensic Hypnosis o References
  3. 3.  People have been entering hypnotic- type trances for thousands and thousands of years - meditation (religion).  Scientific conception of hypnotism wasn't born until the late 1700s.  The father of modern hypnotism is Franz Mesmer, an Austrian physician. Mesmer believed hypnosis to be a mystical force flowing from the hypnotist into the subject (he called it "animal magnetism").
  4. 4. Why is Hypnosis Relevant in Criminal Investigations? Context present in the 1970s supported the active use of hypnosis by police Martin Orne's research suggesting any potential value of hypnosis is offset by the risks of "false confidence" and distortion The Case of the Hillside Strangler
  5. 5.  Between October 1977 and 1978, 10 young women were raped, tortured, and strangled to death. Their bodies were found at various locations on hillsides northeast of LA.  In January 1979, Kenneth Bianchi, a suspect in the case, was arrested in Washington State-but denied any involvement.  Under hypnosis, Bianchi began to display manifestations of multiple personality. A psychiatrist (Glenn Allison) and psychologist (John Watkins) were convinced of the legitimacy of a multiple-personality diagnosis. Later, Orne "tricked" Bianchi, revealing that the symptoms were being faked. Bianchi eventually pleaded guilty to several of the murders, exchanging a guilty plea to avoid the death penalty.
  6. 6. Hypnotists say that subjects under hypnosis are a lot like little kids: playful and imaginative, fully embracing bizarre suggestions.
  7. 7. What is it? What are the states of hypnosis? What are the techniques & requirements of hypnosis?  What are some major effects of hypnosis? How do psychologists explain hypnosis?
  8. 8. An altered state of consciousness during which an individual demonstrates heightened susceptibility to suggestions or commands of the hypnotist. The subconscious regulates your bodily sensations, such as taste, touch and sight, as well as your emotional feelings and the storehouse of your memories.
  9. 9. How? Hypnosis is a way to access a person's subconscious mind directly. Theorized that deep relaxation and focusing exercises of hypnotism work to calm and subdue the conscious mind. In this state, you're still aware of what's going on, but your conscious mind takes a back seat to your subconscious mind. This allows the hypnotist to work directly with the subconscious.
  10. 10.  Before hypnotists bring a subject into a full trance, they generally test the willingness and capacity to be hypnotized. The typical testing method is to make several simple suggestions, such as "Relax your arms completely," and work up to suggestions that ask the subject to suspend disbelief or distort normal thoughts, such as "Pretend you are weightless.
  11. 11. Trance State- characterized by extreme suggestibility, relaxation and heightened imagination Heightened State of Awareness - like daydreaming Fully Conscious Self-hypnosis - movies, etc.
  12. 12.  Techniques: Fixed-gaze induction or eye fixation Rapid Progressive relaxation and imagery Loss of balance
  13. 13.  Requirements: The subject must want to be hypnotized. The subject must believe they can be hypnotized. The subject must eventually feel comfortable and relaxed.
  14. 14. Role Theory State theory Dissociation Theory
  15. 15. According to role theory, hypnosis does not create a special state of consciousness. The procedures for inducing hypnosis provide a socially-acceptable reason to follow these suggestions.
  16. 16. According to state theory, hypnosis creates an altered state of consciousness. Evidence for this perspective comes from observing differences between hypnotized and non-hypnotized subjects.
  17. 17. According to this theory, hypnosis is not one specific state, but rather a general condition in which people reorganize the ways in which their behaviour is controlled. Usually, the ego or self, determines what people pay attention to. This centralized control can be temporarily broken up by a process known as dissociation.
  18. 18.  Increased suggestibility (People are more likely to carry out behaviours and experience feelings and perceptions-even if these are inconsistent with existing environmental conditions.)  Dissociation (a division of consciousness-the "hidden observer.")  Perceptual Distortions (flawed judgment).  Reduced Awareness (of one's environment).
  19. 19. HYPNOSIS AND MEMORY FACILITATION  The view that hypnosis does not induce a state of automatism could be seen as good news for those wishing to promote the use of hypnosis as a memory enhancement tool; nevertheless, the evidence for the use of hypnosis in this role has also been the source of some controversy.
  20. 20. o Highly Suggestible BUT your sense of safety and mortality remain - the hypnotist cannot make you do something you don’t want to do.
  21. 21. Forensic hypnotism, investigators access a subject's deep, repressed memories of a past crime to help identify a suspect or fill in details of the case. Since hypnotists may lead subjects to form false memories, this technique is still very controversial in the forensics world.
  22. 22. http://homepages.rpi.edu/~kalshm/fs/week 5.html http://ericahutton.blogspot.in/2011/05/apply ing-hypnosis-as-forensic-strategy.html

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