Air Conditioning System
By
deepak kindo
3rd year 2nd sem b.tech (agril. Engg.) Student
Introduction
 The air conditioning is that branch of
engineering science which deals with
the study of conditioning of ai...
Air Conditioner Work
 Air conditioners use chemicals that easily
convert from a gas to a liquid and back again.
This chem...
 The working fluid arrives at the
compressor as a cool, low-pressure gas.
The compressor squeezes the fluid. This
packs t...
A typical home air conditioning
window unit.
Classification of Air Conditioning Systems
 Air conditioning systems are divided into
three types as followed:
Individua...
Individual Systems
 use a self-contained ,
factory-made air conditioner
to serve one or two rooms
(e.g. room/ window air
...
Unitary Packaged Systems
 similar in nature to
individual systems but
serve more rooms or
even more than one
floor, have ...
Central (Hydronic) Systems
Basically consists of three major
parts:
◦ Air system – air handling units (AHU), air
distribut...
Air system
 Air Handling Units (AHU)
 Air Distribution System (Air Duct)
An air-handling unit (AHU) is the basic
piece o...
2-Duct System
Air flow
Click on the picture to review the animation.
Chiller Central plant )
 Chillers are a key component of air
conditioning systems for large
buildings. They produce cold ...
Sizing Air Conditioners
 how large your home is and how many
windows it has;
 how much shade is on your home's
windows, ...
Energy Consumption
 Air conditioners are rated by the
number of British Thermal Units (Btu)
of heat they can remove per h...
Energy Efficiency
 Today's best air conditioners use 30% to 50%
less energy than 1970s
 Even if your air conditioner is ...
Energy Saving Methods
 Locate the air conditioner in a window
or wall area near the center of the
room and on the shadies...
The Goal Of A.C System Design
 The goal of an air conditioning system design is to
achieve a highly quality system that f...
Air Conditioning System Selection
 When considering and selecting an air conditioning
system, the designer must understan...
Air Conditioning System Selection
 The designer should consider various system options and
recommend one or several that ...
THE END
THANK YOU FOR YOUR
TIME.
 For any comments.
◦ www.deep13.hpage.com
◦ dkindo13@gmail.com
SPECIAL THANK
Air conditioning system
Air conditioning system
Air conditioning system
Air conditioning system
Air conditioning system
Air conditioning system
Air conditioning system
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Air conditioning system

  1. 1. Air Conditioning System By deepak kindo 3rd year 2nd sem b.tech (agril. Engg.) Student
  2. 2. Introduction  The air conditioning is that branch of engineering science which deals with the study of conditioning of air i.e. supplying & maintaining desirable internal atmospheric condition for human comfort, irrespective of external condition.
  3. 3. Air Conditioner Work  Air conditioners use chemicals that easily convert from a gas to a liquid and back again. This chemical is used to transfer heat from the air inside of a home to the outside air.  The machine has three main parts. They are a compressor, a condenser and an evaporator. The compressor and condenser are usually located on the outside air portion of the air conditioner. The evaporator is located on the inside the house, sometimes as part of a furnace. That's the part that heats your house.
  4. 4.  The working fluid arrives at the compressor as a cool, low-pressure gas. The compressor squeezes the fluid. This packs the molecule of the fluid closer together. The closer the molecules are together, the higher its energy and its temperature.  The working fluid leaves the compressor as a hot, high pressure gas and flows into the condenser. If you looked at the air conditioner part outside a house, look for the part that has metal fins all around. The fins act just like a radiator in a car and helps the heat go away, or dissipate, more quickly.
  5. 5. A typical home air conditioning window unit.
  6. 6. Classification of Air Conditioning Systems  Air conditioning systems are divided into three types as followed: Individual Systems. Unitary Packaged Systems. Central (Hydronic) Systems.
  7. 7. Individual Systems  use a self-contained , factory-made air conditioner to serve one or two rooms (e.g. room/ window air conditioner and split-type units).  It uses vapor compression cycle directly to cool the indoor air for small loads.
  8. 8. Unitary Packaged Systems  similar in nature to individual systems but serve more rooms or even more than one floor, have an air system consisting of fans, coils, filters, ductwork and outlets (e.g. in small restaurants, small shops and small cold storage rooms).
  9. 9. Central (Hydronic) Systems Basically consists of three major parts: ◦ Air system – air handling units (AHU), air distribution (air duct) system and terminals. ◦ Water system – chilled water system, hot water system, condenser water system. ◦ Central plant – refrigeration (chiller) plant, boiler plant.
  10. 10. Air system  Air Handling Units (AHU)  Air Distribution System (Air Duct) An air-handling unit (AHU) is the basic piece of equipment used in an air system. It can be either a field-assembled built-up system or a factory-made unit. Ducts are used in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) to deliver and remove air. These needed airflows include, for example, supply air, return air, and exhaust air
  11. 11. 2-Duct System
  12. 12. Air flow Click on the picture to review the animation.
  13. 13. Chiller Central plant )  Chillers are a key component of air conditioning systems for large buildings. They produce cold water to remove heat from the air in the building.  Common Types of Chillers ◦ Mechanical Compression. ◦ Absorption Chillers.
  14. 14. Sizing Air Conditioners  how large your home is and how many windows it has;  how much shade is on your home's windows, walls, and roof;  how much insulation is in your home's ceiling and walls;  how much air leaks into your home from the outside; and  how much heat the occupants and appliances in your home generate
  15. 15. Energy Consumption  Air conditioners are rated by the number of British Thermal Units (Btu) of heat they can remove per hour. Another common rating term for air conditioning size is the "ton," which is 12,000 Btu per hour.  Room air conditioners range from 5,500 Btu per hour to 14,000 Btu per hour.
  16. 16. Energy Efficiency  Today's best air conditioners use 30% to 50% less energy than 1970s  Even if your air conditioner is only 10 years old, you may save 20% to 40% of your cooling energy costs by replacing it with a newer, more efficient model  Rating is based on how many Btu per hour are removed for each watt of power it draws  For room air conditioners, this efficiency rating is the Energy Efficiency Ratio, or EER  For central air conditioners, it is the Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio, or SEER
  17. 17. Energy Saving Methods  Locate the air conditioner in a window or wall area near the center of the room and on the shadiest side of the house.  Minimize air leakage by fitting the room air conditioner snugly into its opening and sealing gaps with a foam weather stripping material.
  18. 18. The Goal Of A.C System Design  The goal of an air conditioning system design is to achieve a highly quality system that functions effectively and is energy-efficient and cost-effective.  The following are essential for a system to function effectively:  All design criteria are fulfilled, and the requirements of the owner and the user are satisfied.  A good indoor air quality is provided. The system is reliable and has adequate fire protection level (e.g. smoke management).
  19. 19. Air Conditioning System Selection  When considering and selecting an air conditioning system, the designer must understand the building and the client’s requirements and try to study and evaluate the following factors:  Building location, surrounding environment and external climate Uses and functional requirements of the building Client’s budget, investment policy and expected quality of service
  20. 20. Air Conditioning System Selection  The designer should consider various system options and recommend one or several that will be likely to perform as desired. Some of the selection criteria include  Performance requirements – on comfort, noise, control options, flexibility and meeting requirements of local regulations/codes.  Capacity requirements – range of capacity, multiple units, zoning, etc.  Spatial requirement – plant room space, space for ducting and piping (vertical shafts),space for terminal equipment.  Costs – initial cost, operating cost and maintenance cost.  Energy consumption – for both economic and environment reasons.  System qualities – e.g. aesthetics, life, reliability and maintainability.
  21. 21. THE END THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME.  For any comments. ◦ www.deep13.hpage.com ◦ dkindo13@gmail.com
  22. 22. SPECIAL THANK

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