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CFP, special issue on: Gender, Sexuality & Decolonization

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A call for submissions for a special issue, guest edited by Karyn Recollet (University of Toronto) in conjunction with Eric Ritskes, Editor of Decolonization.

Published in: Education
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CFP, special issue on: Gender, Sexuality & Decolonization

  1. 1.   1       Call For Submissions: Gender, Sexuality & Decolonization [December  17,  2014]  Decolonization:  Indigeneity,  Education  &  Society  invites  submissions   from  scholars,  artists,  and  activists  for  a  new  special  issue  of  the  journal  exploring  gender,   sexuality  and  decolonization,  guest  edited  by  Karyn  Recollet  (University  of  Toronto),  in   conjunction  with  Eric  Ritskes,  Editor  of  Decolonization.     This   issue   invites   us   to   consider   both   the   centrality   of   gender   and   sexual   violence   to   colonization,   but   also,   relatedly,   the   centrality   of   gender   and   sexual   justice   to   decolonization.  Too  often  these  issues  have  been  seen  as  peripheral  to  the  larger  struggles   against  colonialism,  too  often  cis-­‐heteropatriarchal  normativity  has  been  justified  in  the   name  of  decolonization.  This  has  to  stop.     To  us,  it  seems  impossible  to  discuss  Indigenous  sovereignty  without  a  discussion  of  body   sovereignty.  It  seems  impossible  to  discuss  environmental  justice  without  connecting  the   violence  against  the  earth  to  the  violences  against  our  bodies,  particularly  the  bodies  of   women,  Two  Spirit,  queer,  transgender  and  others  who  fall  beyond  and  in  resistance  to   the  male  cis-­‐heteropatriarchal  norms  of  colonial  society.  Not  only  do  these  bodies  bear   the   brunt   of   colonial   violence,   they   also   embody,   create   and   sustain   the   theories,   movements,   and   creative   actions   that   resist   it.   Decolonization   is   impossible   without   gender  and  sexual  justice  as  articulated  by  women,  Two  Spirit,  queer,  transgender  and   others  who  fall  beyond  and  in  resistance  to  male  cis-­‐heteropatriarchal  norms.  These  are   the   experiences   and   voices   that   this   issue   seeks   to   center   and   honor   in   seeking   ways   forward  for  decolonization.     As  always,  we  are  interested  in  papers  that  connect  theoretical  discussions  with  active   decolonization  work  by  engaging  the  intersections  of  theory  and  practice.     This  issue  invites  contributors  to  consider  the  following  questions  and  themes  that,  while   far  from  exhaustive,  are  at  the  forefront  of  our  thinking  for  this  issue:     • How  is  colonial  violence  predicated  on  and  enacted  through  cis-­‐heteropatriarchal   gender  norms  and  understandings  of  sexuality?  How  are  these  forms  of  violence   complicated  by  race,  age,  location,  and  space?  As  colonial  violence  is  enacted  on   bodies,  how  is  resistance  and  decolonization  also  embodied?   • What   does   decolonial   love   look   like?   What   is   the   role   of   decolonial   love   in   resistance  and  resurgence?  What  is  the  role  of  hope,  of  envisioning  future  modes   of   relationship   that   both   transcend   and   reconstruct   the   present?   Relatedly,   thinking  of  Audre  Lorde’s  uses  of  the  erotic,  and  the  Native  Youth  Sexual  Health   Network’s  (NYSHN)  use  of  the  term  “Resistance  is  Sexy”,  what  role  does  the  erotic   have  in  resistance?  How  are  decolonial  understandings  of  what  is  sexy  or  erotic   reconstituted  through  resistance  and  struggle?   • How   are   the   experiences   of   Two   Spirit,   transgender,   queer   and   others   who   fall   beyond   and   in   resistance   to   the   male   cis-­‐heteropatriarchal   norms   of   colonial  
  2. 2.   2   society  central  in  engaging  and  generating  a  politics  of  refusal,  particularly  refusal   of  the  settler  colonial  state  and  its  definitional  power?  How,  through  this  refusal,   are   we   generating   spatial   (de/re)orientations   of   decolonial   love,   reconstructing   and  remapping  the  spaces  where  gender  and  sexual  justice  might  happen  outside   and   at   the   margins   of   the   state,   as   part   of   a   trajectory   against   and   beyond   the   state?   • How  do  we  pull  back  or  unlayer  the  colonial  violences  that  hyper-­‐  or  de-­‐sexualize   Indigenous,  Black  and  peoples  of  color,  by  renaming  where  we  find  beauty  in  our   communities  and  our  selves  on  our  own  terms?   • What  are  the  creative  practices  in  which  Indigenous,  Black  and  other  non-­‐White   feminisms   intervene   into   cis-­‐heteropatriarchy,   coloniality,   and   other   related   systems  of  oppression?  What  vocabularies  of  feminism  are  being  (re)imagined  and   (re)generated,   what   practices   being   created,   in   these   communities   to   combat   colonialism  and  create  solidarity  against  colonial  patriarchy  and  white  supremacy   along  the  lines  of  gender  and  sexuality?   • What  are  Indigenous  and  other  traditions  of  gender  and  sexual  justice?  How  has   the  ‘traditional’  been  mobilized  in  ways  that  further,  and  are  complicit  in,  colonial   cis-­‐heteropatriarchal  violences?  How  might  tradition  and  traditional  practices  be   re-­‐conceptualized,   re-­‐generated,   or   re-­‐understood   through   gender   and   sexual   justice  paradigms?   • How  are  youth,  as  well  as  other  gender  and  sexual  justice  advocates,  mobilizing  in   new   ways,   utilizing   new   tools,   and   establishing   new   forums   for   decolonizing   practices?   What   generative   critiques   are   being   encoded   into   and   through   these   new   tools;   for   example,   in   and   through   digital   territories?   How   might   intergenerational  dialogues  be  created  to  further  the  decolonization  of  gender  and   sexual  justice?     • Often   anticolonial   violence   has   been   theorized   and   enacted   within   cis-­‐ heteropatriarchal  norms,  enacting  problematic  tropes  of  the  soldier,  the  warrior,   or  the  revolutionary  that  are  rooted  in  gender  violences.  How  have  women,  Two   Spirit,   transgender,   queer   and   others   who   fall   beyond   and   in   resistance   to   cis-­‐ heteropatriarchal   norms   been   silenced   and   marginalized   in   anticolonial   and   decolonization  movements  through  these  tropes?  How  might  decolonization  (and   conceptions   of   anticolonial   violence)   be   reconceptualized   or   reimagined   within   feminist,  queer,  transgender,  Two  Spirit,  or  other  paradigms?     Contributions   are   to   be   submitted   at   www.decolonization.org   no   later   than   March   16,   2015.  This  issue  is  scheduled  for  release  in  Fall  2015.     Articles   should   follow   our   journal   style   guidelines,   which   can   be   found   here.   Scholarly   articles   are   subject   to   a   double-­‐blind   peer   review   and   details   can   be   found   here.   Submitted   contributions   may   also   include   short   non-­‐peer-­‐reviewed   papers   and   commentary,  visual  art,  audio,  video,  poetry  or  interviews.     If  you  have  any  further  questions,  please  don’t  hesitate  to  contact  us  at   editors@decolonization.org  

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